Displaying items by tag: entertainment

  • Published in Music

Word on the Street: Basking in Waves of Progress

MADISONVILLE, KY (7/19/13)—Full-spectrum progress is rarely a measurable, down-to-the-speck concept. Oftentimes, authentic progress is evidenced by an anomalous, subjective feeling imparted upon an individual or a collective group through a set of direct or indirect experiences. And it’s the aforementioned sense of subjectivity that’s key, because, like beauty, the notions of development and growth are ultimately in the eye of the beholder. To put it bluntly, it’s up to the observers—the people of Hopkins County and west Kentucky in this case—to recognize and appreciate the encouraging changes around us rather than focusing on the negatives that can tarnish our perceptions.

So, why examine this concept here? And how does this perspective on progress connect with our community?

While I could recount a variety of past experiences that would answer these questions adequately, I’d rather point to something specific that took place a week ago.

It was the night of Friday, July 12th, and myself, as well as a couple of close friends, suddenly found ourselves completely immersed in this peculiar sense of progress as we stood on my back porch in Madisonville, listening to the sounds of positive change emanating from the downtown district.

Yet, it had taken a full day—or perhaps even years in retrospect—ripe with tedious, but rewarding, business-related efforts and enjoyable interaction with people in our community before we were once again led to what has become a fairly familiar realization as of late: our area is growing in the right direction.

Let’s start at the beginning.

Much like any other day, Jessica Dockrey and I completed our summer morning routine, which includes getting my daughter ready for the day, taking her to stay with a member of my family so we can focus on business, eating breakfast upon our return, taking showers, putting some fresh clothes on, and pounding away at a variety of Sugg Street Post-related tasks until the late afternoon. The difference with this particular day, however, was that we would be participating in the City of Madisonville’s second installment of the 2013 Friday Night Live summer concert and entertainment series.

As with the first FNL we attended back in June, we were excited to check out the event’s entertainment lineup and to talk with attendants about the Sugg Street Post. We were also eager to see our friends out at the event having a good time with their families.

So, as the mid-morning quickly turned to late-afternoon, we packed up our table, a banner, some blank note cards for an advertising giveaway, business cards, and a few fold-out chairs, and headed toward the city’s downtown district to set up our booth.

As before, we were lucky enough to have a spot on the corner of Court and Union Streets where we could see the performance stage while also meeting with a variety of FNL patrons.

Though attendance for the event underwent gradual growth throughout the evening, the turnout for the summer concert series, which was made possible via a partnership with Baptist Health Madisonville and the Hopkins County Tourist and Convention Commission, was perhaps the best I’ve seen in four years by the time 7:30pm rolled around.

Along with booths from a variety of businesses and organizations, a motorcycle show hosted by the Hopkins County Central Archery Team on East Center Street, and onsite food and refreshment services—which included the Madisonville-Hopkins County Chamber of Commerce’s beer garden—the event also boasted a three-part musical lineup that included Larry Grisham and The Beat Daddys, Elvis impersonator Brad McCrady, and the acclaimed Boscoe France Band.

Furthermore, we (Jessica, close friend and photographer Jeff Harp, and I) got to meet and talk with a lot of fresh faces that were excited about the Sugg Street Post and the support we try to offer up to the local arts and entertainment scene in western Kentucky. For our fans and supporters, we are truly grateful.

Yet, by the time 8:15pm rolled around, we were physically and mentally exhausted. It was the culmination of a work week that seemed to stretch much farther than five days and we were ready for some down time at home. While we didn’t want to miss what was surely going to be one of the biggest and most anticipated shows of the season—a live performance by Guitar Center’s national 2012 Battle of the Blues winner and Hopkins County native, Boscoe France—we succumbed to our human frailties and packed it up, ready to relax in the comforts of our own home.

With most everything unloaded, we took off our shoes, popped open a couple of brews, and headed out toward the back porch of our home on the south end of town to take in the relaxing sights of the night sky. And as we walked past the threshold some six to seven blocks away from downtown Madisonville and FNL, we were greeted by the soulful howls and bluesy wailing of The Boscoe France Band cutting a smooth grove into the evening air.

We weren’t going to miss the show after all.

I was born here, and I’ve lived in or nearby Madisonville for the majority of my life, but I can honestly say that I’ve never been able to hear music from an event this clearly. Not only could I hear the performance, but it was truly phenomenal music. We all looked at each other and seemed to exclaim the same sentiments in unison, “This is awesome!”

And it truly was awe-inspiring in that moment. To us, it was a sign of where our small town is headed.

Throughout the hour-and-a-half set, we all felt as though we were witness to something special. It was pure. It was evolution. It was a triumph for our local scene wrapped up in a seemingly simple package of sound waves, nice weather, and cool night air. It was about friendship and a shared vision. Sure, there may have been a handful of local folks trying to get some sleep that night, but, on the whole, our town was truly alive. It was electric, loud, and stunning.

We were at home, relaxing in a chair with our feet kicked up, and we could hear the sounds of progress, the rumble of bikes roaring down the streets, the clickety-clack and groan of a train passing through the darkness, reminding us of what a great place we have to call home.

____________________________________________

Want to learn more about Madisonville’s 2013 Friday Night Live summer concert series? If so, click the following link: 

http://www.madisonvillegov.com/Madisonville_Kentucky/index.asp?Page=Friday%20Night%20Live

To learn more about Boscoe France and The Boscie France Band, click here or click the YouTube player attached below this article.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photo provided by Boscoe France

Read more...

Word on the Street: Basking in Waves of Progress

MADISONVILLE, KY (7/19/13)—Full-spectrum progress is rarely a measurable, down-to-the-speck concept. Oftentimes, authentic progress is evidenced by an anomalous, subjective feeling imparted upon an individual or a collective group through a set of direct or indirect experiences. And it’s the aforementioned sense of subjectivity that’s key, because, like beauty, the notions of development and growth are ultimately in the eye of the beholder. To put it bluntly, it’s up to the observers—the people of Hopkins County and west Kentucky in this case—to recognize and appreciate the encouraging changes around us rather than focusing on the negatives that can tarnish our perceptions.

So, why examine this concept here? And how does this perspective on progress connect with our community?

While I could recount a variety of past experiences that would answer these questions adequately, I’d rather point to something specific that took place a week ago.

It was the night of Friday, July 12th, and myself, as well as a couple of close friends, suddenly found ourselves completely immersed in this peculiar sense of progress as we stood on my back porch in Madisonville, listening to the sounds of positive change emanating from the downtown district.

Yet, it had taken a full day—or perhaps even years in retrospect—ripe with tedious, but rewarding, business-related efforts and enjoyable interaction with people in our community before we were once again led to what has become a fairly familiar realization as of late: our area is growing in the right direction.

Let’s start at the beginning.

Much like any other day, Jessica Dockrey and I completed our summer morning routine, which includes getting my daughter ready for the day, taking her to stay with a member of my family so we can focus on business, eating breakfast upon our return, taking showers, putting some fresh clothes on, and pounding away at a variety of Sugg Street Post-related tasks until the late afternoon. The difference with this particular day, however, was that we would be participating in the City of Madisonville’s second installment of the 2013 Friday Night Live summer concert and entertainment series.

As with the first FNL we attended back in June, we were excited to check out the event’s entertainment lineup and to talk with attendants about the Sugg Street Post. We were also eager to see our friends out at the event having a good time with their families.

So, as the mid-morning quickly turned to late-afternoon, we packed up our table, a banner, some blank note cards for an advertising giveaway, business cards, and a few fold-out chairs, and headed toward the city’s downtown district to set up our booth.

As before, we were lucky enough to have a spot on the corner of Court and Union Streets where we could see the performance stage while also meeting with a variety of FNL patrons.

Though attendance for the event underwent gradual growth throughout the evening, the turnout for the summer concert series, which was made possible via a partnership with Baptist Health Madisonville and the Hopkins County Tourist and Convention Commission, was perhaps the best I’ve seen in four years by the time 7:30pm rolled around.

Along with booths from a variety of businesses and organizations, a motorcycle show hosted by the Hopkins County Central Archery Team on East Center Street, and onsite food and refreshment services—which included the Madisonville-Hopkins County Chamber of Commerce’s beer garden—the event also boasted a three-part musical lineup that included Larry Grisham and The Beat Daddys, Elvis impersonator Brad McCrady, and the acclaimed Boscoe France Band.

Furthermore, we (Jessica, close friend and photographer Jeff Harp, and I) got to meet and talk with a lot of fresh faces that were excited about the Sugg Street Post and the support we try to offer up to the local arts and entertainment scene in western Kentucky. For our fans and supporters, we are truly grateful.

Yet, by the time 8:15pm rolled around, we were physically and mentally exhausted. It was the culmination of a work week that seemed to stretch much farther than five days and we were ready for some down time at home. While we didn’t want to miss what was surely going to be one of the biggest and most anticipated shows of the season—a live performance by Guitar Center’s national 2012 Battle of the Blues winner and Hopkins County native, Boscoe France—we succumbed to our human frailties and packed it up, ready to relax in the comforts of our own home.

With most everything unloaded, we took off our shoes, popped open a couple of brews, and headed out toward the back porch of our home on the south end of town to take in the relaxing sights of the night sky. And as we walked past the threshold some six to seven blocks away from downtown Madisonville and FNL, we were greeted by the soulful howls and bluesy wailing of The Boscoe France Band cutting a smooth grove into the evening air.

We weren’t going to miss the show after all.

I was born here, and I’ve lived in or nearby Madisonville for the majority of my life, but I can honestly say that I’ve never been able to hear music from an event this clearly. Not only could I hear the performance, but it was truly phenomenal music. We all looked at each other and seemed to exclaim the same sentiments in unison, “This is awesome!”

And it truly was awe-inspiring in that moment. To us, it was a sign of where our small town is headed.

Throughout the hour-and-a-half set, we all felt as though we were witness to something special. It was pure. It was evolution. It was a triumph for our local scene wrapped up in a seemingly simple package of sound waves, nice weather, and cool night air. It was about friendship and a shared vision. Sure, there may have been a handful of local folks trying to get some sleep that night, but, on the whole, our town was truly alive. It was electric, loud, and stunning.

We were at home, relaxing in a chair with our feet kicked up, and we could hear the sounds of progress, the rumble of bikes roaring down the streets, the clickety-clack and groan of a train passing through the darkness, reminding us of what a great place we have to call home.

____________________________________________

Want to learn more about Madisonville’s 2013 Friday Night Live summer concert series? If so, click the following link:

http://www.madisonvillegov.com/Madisonville_Kentucky/index.asp?Page=Friday%20Night%20Live

To learn more about Boscoe France and The Boscie France Band, click here or click the YouTube player attached below this article.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photo provided by Boscoe France

Read more...
  • Published in Music

Glema Center Unveils Impressive 2013-14 Lineup, Tickets Available Online

MADISONVILLE, KY (6/24/13) - The Madisonville Community College Glema Mahr Center for the Arts announces its 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!” From the figurative “Ring of Fire” to the Kenya Safari Acrobats literally jumping through flame, this season promises to be sizzling! Headliners this season include the Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug), Gloria Gaynor, and Rick Springfield.

The other “HOT” news is that the Glema now has online ticketing! Patrons can purchase tickets from the comfort of home, by phone, or in person. Tickets go on sale to current package buyers July 8, new package buyers July 22, and single tickets go on sale July 29. The Everything Ticket is only $350 for 20 performances and saves $115 off of the single ticket cost. Please call (270) 821-2787 or visit http://www.glemacenter.org for more information on the Center’s offerings.

There is still one more show left in the 2012-13 Season! The Glema Center’s community theatre production of Rodgers’ & Hammerstein’s The King & I runs July 19-21!


Glema Mahr Center for the Arts 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!”


Center Stage Series

The Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug)
Friday, September 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $45/$40

What began as a group of studio musicians getting together just for fun quickly evolved into The Time Jumpers becoming Nashville legends! The group earned a loyal following for their lively take on classic Western swing and old-school country music.
Sponsored by Old National Bank

Ring of Fire: The Life & Music of Johnny Cash
Friday, September 27, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $26/$21
Touching on the life and times of one of the world’s most legendary musical artists, Johnny Cash, the musical revue “Ring of Fire” is considered one of the best “jukebox musicals” of our time. Although Cash himself is never impersonated, Ring of Fire features a company of performers that will guide you on a journey through Cash’s storied life and celebrated music. With smashing medleys and bounce in its guitar-driven energy, this show will have you stompin’ your feet and asking for more! (Sponsored by Hudson Automotive)

Sarah Council Dance Projects-Featuring music performed by Carla Gover & Anna Gevalt-Roberts
Saturday, November 16, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 general admission
Sarah Council Dance Projects is a project-based dance company founded in 2007 by choreographer Sarah Council as a platform to create emotionally and physically honest dance performance works. These dances explore and reflect life’s poignant moments, from the beautiful to the tragic, and the curious to the absurd. (Sponsored by Juanita Badgett Performing Arts Endowment; Residency Support by the Estates of Ruth and Sue Anne Salmon. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council)

Gloria Gaynor-Christmas with the Queen of Disco
Friday, December 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $40/$35

“I Will Survive” climbed to the top of Billboard’s Pop Charts in 1979, claiming the #1 position on two different occasions. Little did Gloria Gaynor know at the time, the song would eventually become a rallying cry for social survival and remain as relevant today as it was three decades ago. The inspiring single is just the tip of the iceberg where this talented performer’s repertoire is concerned. (Sponsored by Hopkins County Tourist & Convention Commission; Additional Support Provided by the Enduring Legacy of Mrs. Glema Mahr)

H.M.S. Pinafore Presented by New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, Albert Bergeret, Artistic Director
Thursday, March 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $28/$24 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Now. Sea. Here. Ride a wave of music and laughter as romantic sailors, sisters, cousins, and aunts sing and dance their way across the deck of the fanciful British naval vessel with the improbable name. If you liked NYGASP’s productions of “The Mikado” and “Pirates of Penzance”, you’ll love the humor and beautiful music of Gilbert & Sullivan’s first masterpiece! (Sponsored by Anne P. Baker Endowment for Sustained Excellence in the Arts)

Rick Springfield
Friday, April 11, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $50/$45

For all of his accomplishments as an actor, best-selling author and documentary subject, Rick Springfield has always insisted his first love is music. With 25 million albums sold and 17 Top 40 hits, including the 1981 #1 hit “Jessie’s Girl”, (which earned him a Grammy for Best Male Rock Vocal), it is evident music is indeed his great love. (Sponsored by Baptist Health Madisonville)

US Bank Family Specials

A Children’s Nutcracker Presented by Children’s Center for Dance Education
Tuesday, December 10, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $16/$12 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Tchaikovsky’s famous ballet is performed by children for children. Children’s Center for Dance Education and local dancers celebrate this timeless classic. Auditions for local children will be held Sunday, September 29, 2013 at 2 p.m.

Kenya Safari Acrobats
Friday, April 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $18/$14 (Children 12 & under half-price)

The Kenya Safari Acrobats offer a truly unique cultural experience. They perform a non-stop ride of gravity-defying human pyramids, balancing, tumbling, limbo dancing, hurling through hoops and breathtaking contortions, all while clapping to a joyful Benga beat. Combining artistry with humor and playfulness, these gymnasts are a huge crowd pleaser!

Glema Mahr Chamber Music Series

Sonya Baker-Soprano
Thursday, October 3, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Sonya Gabrielle Baker, noted for her performances of American classical vocal music, has been heard in concert both nationally and internationally, from appearances in Carnegie Hall to the Kremlin.

Sarah E. Geller-Violin
Saturday, November 23, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Described as “a consummate artist performing with convincing vigor and passion,” violinist Sarah E. Geller has performed to critical acclaim coast to coast.

Sara Sant’Ambrogio-Cello
Thursday, February 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Grammy Award-winning cellist Sara Sant’Ambrogio has performed throughout the world at major music centers and festivals and is a founding member of the Eroica Trio.

Pavel Kolesnikov-Piano, 2012 Honens Prize Laureate
Thursday, April 3, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

The Telegraph (London) describes 2012 Honens Prize Laureate pianist Pavel Kolesnikov’s playing as having “brilliance, but also a caressing, almost sly intimacy.”

Hancock Bank & Trust Coffeehouse Series

Robin & Linda Williams-Americana
Tuesday, October 15, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

For more than three decades now, These “Prairie Home Companion” regulars have made it their mission to perform the music that they love, “a robust blend of bluegrass, folk, old-time and acoustic country that combines wryly observant lyrics with a wide-ranging melodicism.”

Jane L. Powell-Goddess of Soul
Friday, November 8, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

“A certain talent comes along every 20 years or so, and Jane is it.” Tony Bennett
Ms. Powell quickly captivates any audience with her musical flexibility, open and playful personality, and spicy, spontaneous sense of humor.

Tiempo Libre-Latin Jazz
Saturday, February 1, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

This three-time Grammy-nominated Cuban music group is one of the hottest young bands today. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council.

Ben Sollee-Genre-bending Cello & Vocals
Saturday, March 22, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Known for his thrilling cello playing that incorporates new techniques to create a unique mix of folk, bluegrass, jazz and R&B, Ben Sollee possesses rough, smooth, smoky vocal stylings and a knack for intricate arrangements.

First United Bank and Trust Proud Partnerships

Hairspray! presented by Hopkins County Central High School Fine Arts Department
Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Book by Mark O’Donnell & Thomas Meehan, Music & Lyrics by Marc Shaiman, Lyrics by Scott Wittman
Can a larger-than-life adolescent manage to vanquish the local TV dance program’s reigning princess, integrate the television show, and find true love (singing and dancing all the while, of course!) without mussing her hair? Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Willy Wonka presented by Madisonville North Hopkins High School Music Department
Friday, March 14, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, March 15, 2014 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Music and Lyrics by Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley, Adapted for the Stage by Timothy Allen McDonald & Leslie Bricusse
Roald Dahl’s timeless story of the world-famous candy man and his quest to find an heir comes to life in this stage adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which features the songs from the classic family film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Community Theatre
(Permanent support for Community Theatre provided by J.B. & Kiel Moore Community Programs Endowment)

I’m Not Rappaport by Herb Gardner-Dinner Theatre
February 20-22, 2014 ∙ 6:30 p.m.
Tickets: (includes dinner) $22

This Tony award-winning play takes a humorous, yet poignant look at dreams and the realities of aging through the eyes of two octogenarians. Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. (Sponsored by Dick & Phyllis Frymire and Ralph & Sue Mitchell)

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
July 18 & 19, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ July 20, 2014 ∙ 2 p.m.
Tickets: $16 (general admission)

Music & lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Book by Hugh Wheeler
A rare instance of a musical thriller, the Glema proudly presents Stephen Sondheim’s chilling, suspenseful, heart-pounding masterpiece of murderous “barberism” and culinary crime. The sophisticated and breath-taking music mixes with visceral drama and deliciously funny moments of dark humor. You’ll find yourself laughing hysterically before gasping in surprise. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International. Recommended for ages 14 and up due to violence and mature themes. (Sponsored by Don & Mary Susan Fishman)

Special Events

Back 2 School Bash
Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 4–10 p.m.
Free Admission (Bring your lawn chairs)

Join us for this annual celebration of local talent featuring Guitar Center’s 2012 Battle of the Blues winner, Boscoe France, as this year’s Headliner.
(Sponsored by the Miner Family Arts Endowment)

A Community Christmas-MCC Singers & Local Ensembles
Friday, December 6, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Join us for this annual tradition as local choral groups team up with community-based instrumental ensembles to ring in the Season.
(Sponsored by United Southern Bank Additional support provided by Mrs. Betty Trover, Allen & Pam Rudd, Barry & Gail Eveland, Dr. & Mrs. J.L. Hamman, & Dr. Judith L. Rhoads)

Kristen Iverson-Author of Full Body Burden
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Kristen Iversen is the author of Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats, a finalist for the Barnes & Noble Discover Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence. Ms. Iverson holds a Ph.D from the University of Denver and is an associate professor at the University of Memphis, where she directs the MFA program in creative writing. Full Body Burden has been chosen as MCC’s “Common Reader” for the 2013-14 academic year.

The Anne P. Baker Gallery

August 17-October 4, 2013
Glema Center Juried Art Exhibit & Glema Center Juried Photography Exhibit
Reception & Awards, Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 2 p.m.

Permanent support for gallery exhibits provided by the Robbie P. Ruby Memorial Endowment.

Information about exhibits throughout the year, as well as any of the events mentioned above, are available at www.glemacenter.org

Sugg Street Post
Information/lineup provided by the Glema Mahr Center for the Arts via Brad Downall

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  • Published in Art

Glema Center Unveils Impressive 2013-14 Lineup, Tickets Available Online

MADISONVILLE, KY (6/24/13) - The Madisonville Community College Glema Mahr Center for the Arts announces its 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!” From the figurative “Ring of Fire” to the Kenya Safari Acrobats literally jumping through flame, this season promises to be sizzling! Headliners this season include the Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug), Gloria Gaynor, and Rick Springfield.

The other “HOT” news is that the Glema now has online ticketing! Patrons can purchase tickets from the comfort of home, by phone, or in person. Tickets go on sale to current package buyers July 8, new package buyers July 22, and single tickets go on sale July 29. The Everything Ticket is only $350 for 20 performances and saves $115 off of the single ticket cost. Please call (270) 821-2787 or visit http://www.glemacenter.org for more information on the Center’s offerings.

There is still one more show left in the 2012-13 Season! The Glema Center’s community theatre production of Rodgers’ & Hammerstein’s The King & I runs July 19-21!


Glema Mahr Center for the Arts 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!”


Center Stage Series

The Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug)
Friday, September 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $45/$40

What began as a group of studio musicians getting together just for fun quickly evolved into The Time Jumpers becoming Nashville legends! The group earned a loyal following for their lively take on classic Western swing and old-school country music.
Sponsored by Old National Bank

Ring of Fire: The Life & Music of Johnny Cash
Friday, September 27, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $26/$21
Touching on the life and times of one of the world’s most legendary musical artists, Johnny Cash, the musical revue “Ring of Fire” is considered one of the best “jukebox musicals” of our time. Although Cash himself is never impersonated, Ring of Fire features a company of performers that will guide you on a journey through Cash’s storied life and celebrated music. With smashing medleys and bounce in its guitar-driven energy, this show will have you stompin’ your feet and asking for more! (Sponsored by Hudson Automotive)

Sarah Council Dance Projects-Featuring music performed by Carla Gover & Anna Gevalt-Roberts
Saturday, November 16, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 general admission
Sarah Council Dance Projects is a project-based dance company founded in 2007 by choreographer Sarah Council as a platform to create emotionally and physically honest dance performance works. These dances explore and reflect life’s poignant moments, from the beautiful to the tragic, and the curious to the absurd. (Sponsored by Juanita Badgett Performing Arts Endowment; Residency Support by the Estates of Ruth and Sue Anne Salmon. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council)

Gloria Gaynor-Christmas with the Queen of Disco
Friday, December 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $40/$35

“I Will Survive” climbed to the top of Billboard’s Pop Charts in 1979, claiming the #1 position on two different occasions. Little did Gloria Gaynor know at the time, the song would eventually become a rallying cry for social survival and remain as relevant today as it was three decades ago. The inspiring single is just the tip of the iceberg where this talented performer’s repertoire is concerned. (Sponsored by Hopkins County Tourist & Convention Commission; Additional Support Provided by the Enduring Legacy of Mrs. Glema Mahr)

H.M.S. Pinafore Presented by New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, Albert Bergeret, Artistic Director
Thursday, March 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $28/$24 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Now. Sea. Here. Ride a wave of music and laughter as romantic sailors, sisters, cousins, and aunts sing and dance their way across the deck of the fanciful British naval vessel with the improbable name. If you liked NYGASP’s productions of “The Mikado” and “Pirates of Penzance”, you’ll love the humor and beautiful music of Gilbert & Sullivan’s first masterpiece! (Sponsored by Anne P. Baker Endowment for Sustained Excellence in the Arts)

Rick Springfield
Friday, April 11, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $50/$45

For all of his accomplishments as an actor, best-selling author and documentary subject, Rick Springfield has always insisted his first love is music. With 25 million albums sold and 17 Top 40 hits, including the 1981 #1 hit “Jessie’s Girl”, (which earned him a Grammy for Best Male Rock Vocal), it is evident music is indeed his great love. (Sponsored by Baptist Health Madisonville)

US Bank Family Specials

A Children’s Nutcracker Presented by Children’s Center for Dance Education
Tuesday, December 10, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $16/$12 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Tchaikovsky’s famous ballet is performed by children for children. Children’s Center for Dance Education and local dancers celebrate this timeless classic. Auditions for local children will be held Sunday, September 29, 2013 at 2 p.m.

Kenya Safari Acrobats
Friday, April 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $18/$14 (Children 12 & under half-price)

The Kenya Safari Acrobats offer a truly unique cultural experience. They perform a non-stop ride of gravity-defying human pyramids, balancing, tumbling, limbo dancing, hurling through hoops and breathtaking contortions, all while clapping to a joyful Benga beat. Combining artistry with humor and playfulness, these gymnasts are a huge crowd pleaser!

Glema Mahr Chamber Music Series

Sonya Baker-Soprano
Thursday, October 3, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Sonya Gabrielle Baker, noted for her performances of American classical vocal music, has been heard in concert both nationally and internationally, from appearances in Carnegie Hall to the Kremlin.

Sarah E. Geller-Violin
Saturday, November 23, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Described as “a consummate artist performing with convincing vigor and passion,” violinist Sarah E. Geller has performed to critical acclaim coast to coast.

Sara Sant’Ambrogio-Cello
Thursday, February 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Grammy Award-winning cellist Sara Sant’Ambrogio has performed throughout the world at major music centers and festivals and is a founding member of the Eroica Trio.

Pavel Kolesnikov-Piano, 2012 Honens Prize Laureate
Thursday, April 3, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

The Telegraph (London) describes 2012 Honens Prize Laureate pianist Pavel Kolesnikov’s playing as having “brilliance, but also a caressing, almost sly intimacy.”

Hancock Bank & Trust Coffeehouse Series

Robin & Linda Williams-Americana
Tuesday, October 15, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

For more than three decades now, These “Prairie Home Companion” regulars have made it their mission to perform the music that they love, “a robust blend of bluegrass, folk, old-time and acoustic country that combines wryly observant lyrics with a wide-ranging melodicism.”

Jane L. Powell-Goddess of Soul
Friday, November 8, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

“A certain talent comes along every 20 years or so, and Jane is it.” Tony Bennett
Ms. Powell quickly captivates any audience with her musical flexibility, open and playful personality, and spicy, spontaneous sense of humor.

Tiempo Libre-Latin Jazz
Saturday, February 1, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

This three-time Grammy-nominated Cuban music group is one of the hottest young bands today. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council.

Ben Sollee-Genre-bending Cello & Vocals
Saturday, March 22, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Known for his thrilling cello playing that incorporates new techniques to create a unique mix of folk, bluegrass, jazz and R&B, Ben Sollee possesses rough, smooth, smoky vocal stylings and a knack for intricate arrangements.

First United Bank and Trust Proud Partnerships

Hairspray! presented by Hopkins County Central High School Fine Arts Department
Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Book by Mark O’Donnell & Thomas Meehan, Music & Lyrics by Marc Shaiman, Lyrics by Scott Wittman
Can a larger-than-life adolescent manage to vanquish the local TV dance program’s reigning princess, integrate the television show, and find true love (singing and dancing all the while, of course!) without mussing her hair? Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Willy Wonka presented by Madisonville North Hopkins High School Music Department
Friday, March 14, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, March 15, 2014 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Music and Lyrics by Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley, Adapted for the Stage by Timothy Allen McDonald & Leslie Bricusse
Roald Dahl’s timeless story of the world-famous candy man and his quest to find an heir comes to life in this stage adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which features the songs from the classic family film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Community Theatre
(Permanent support for Community Theatre provided by J.B. & Kiel Moore Community Programs Endowment)

I’m Not Rappaport by Herb Gardner-Dinner Theatre
February 20-22, 2014 ∙ 6:30 p.m.
Tickets: (includes dinner) $22

This Tony award-winning play takes a humorous, yet poignant look at dreams and the realities of aging through the eyes of two octogenarians. Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. (Sponsored by Dick & Phyllis Frymire and Ralph & Sue Mitchell)

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
July 18 & 19, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ July 20, 2014 ∙ 2 p.m.
Tickets: $16 (general admission)

Music & lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Book by Hugh Wheeler
A rare instance of a musical thriller, the Glema proudly presents Stephen Sondheim’s chilling, suspenseful, heart-pounding masterpiece of murderous “barberism” and culinary crime. The sophisticated and breath-taking music mixes with visceral drama and deliciously funny moments of dark humor. You’ll find yourself laughing hysterically before gasping in surprise. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International. Recommended for ages 14 and up due to violence and mature themes. (Sponsored by Don & Mary Susan Fishman)

Special Events

Back 2 School Bash
Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 4–10 p.m.
Free Admission (Bring your lawn chairs)

Join us for this annual celebration of local talent featuring Guitar Center’s 2012 Battle of the Blues winner, Boscoe France, as this year’s Headliner.
(Sponsored by the Miner Family Arts Endowment)

A Community Christmas-MCC Singers & Local Ensembles
Friday, December 6, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Join us for this annual tradition as local choral groups team up with community-based instrumental ensembles to ring in the Season.
(Sponsored by United Southern Bank Additional support provided by Mrs. Betty Trover, Allen & Pam Rudd, Barry & Gail Eveland, Dr. & Mrs. J.L. Hamman, & Dr. Judith L. Rhoads)

Kristen Iverson-Author of Full Body Burden
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Kristen Iversen is the author of Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats, a finalist for the Barnes & Noble Discover Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence. Ms. Iverson holds a Ph.D from the University of Denver and is an associate professor at the University of Memphis, where she directs the MFA program in creative writing. Full Body Burden has been chosen as MCC’s “Common Reader” for the 2013-14 academic year.

The Anne P. Baker Gallery

August 17-October 4, 2013
Glema Center Juried Art Exhibit & Glema Center Juried Photography Exhibit
Reception & Awards, Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 2 p.m.

Permanent support for gallery exhibits provided by the Robbie P. Ruby Memorial Endowment.

Information about exhibits throughout the year, as well as any of the events mentioned above, are available at www.glemacenter.org

Sugg Street Post
Information/lineup provided by the Glema Mahr Center for the Arts via Brad Downall

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The Courthouse

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (6/21/13) - A siren could be heard in the distance. There were loud popping sounds accompanying the bright flashes, which were accentuating the night sky. Exploding firecrackers added to the excitement of the occasion. A marching band struck up a hearty rendition of the "Star Spangled Banner.” The street signs were adorned with flags and brightly colored placards. The old courthouse was lit with red and blue lights. As always, the courthouse was the focal point for the annual Independence Day celebration. The townspeople lined the streets to witness the pageantry of this patriotic event. It was a time to also reflect on the one hundred and twenty-seven celebrations which had come before.

A cannon salute signaled the festivities of the 1886 celebration. The town was not only celebrating the birth of the nation, but a new courthouse as well. People came as far as fifty miles away to see this wondrous structure. It was an extremely ornate building supported by marble pillars. In the center of the structure was an impressive clock which chimed on every hour. Each window was individually sculptured with lead glass in each pane. Over the huge double entrance was carved: COUNTY COURTHOUSE. At the top of the steeple, a flag stood motionless in the hot summer air. There was loud cheering as Civil War veterans rode proudly past on their spirited steeds. The mayor proclaimed: "This building is dedicated to all those individuals who are committed to keeping our country free." With that, the crowd roared its resounding approval. The courthouse was the picture of modern architecture and gothic beauty.

At the turn of the Twentieth Century, a different celebration was being held. The long overdue monument to the Civil War dead was being dedicated. A local resident who had served directly under General Grant was the first to speak: "It was a scary time for the country and for a nineteen-year-old soldier." He continued: "I remember how badly I felt when I heard that President Lincoln had been shot. I truly believed the country had lost the only person who could put it back together again." The recent assassination of President McKinley was still in the minds of the people in the audience. The old soldier gave way to another who had fought on the opposite side. This gentleman had fought gallantly under General George Pickett, having survived the famous charge at Gettysburg. He spoke in a high, piercing voice: "It was a time of stubbornness and unmitigated pride. We thought we were fighting for a principle, but we were really caught up with the aura of the times." There were more speeches that day and more painful memories. A bugle sounded taps as the flag was raised to half-mast atop the courthouse steeple. The courthouse was sullenly quiet. We were mourning the recent loss of a President and the passing of a bygone era.

Fifteen years later, the country was in the middle of the First World War. There were streamers galore, each sending a message of support to doughboys everywhere. Lemonade flowed freely to quench the thirst caused by the boiling sun. A sign was hung over the courthouse entrance. It read: WE SUPPORT OUR BOYS. There were patriotic essays read aloud by local dignitaries. An essay by a ten-year old girl from a nearby county was declared the winner. She wrote how proud she was of her country. She also wrote about the beautiful countryside with its colorful flowers and towering sycamore trees. The day could not have been complete without a parade. In keeping with the mood, the parade's theme reflected support for America in its war effort. The courthouse chimed a resounding eight times signifying the end of a perfect celebration.

In 1933, the country was in the middle of a horrible depression. The courthouse, in fact, housed all kinds of helping agencies created by the Roosevelt Administration. However, today's celebration was anything but glum. There was an abundance of food and drinks available in the makeshift cafeteria located in tents in back of the courthouse. The courthouse had just received a new coat of paint inside and out. It looked and smelled like a new building. There was promise in the air. Hope could easily have been the theme for this year's gathering. The courthouse was being visited today by the Governor himself. He was to speak about the New Deal program and what it meant to farmers. This was a farming community and what he had to say would be important to everyone in the county. The band played "Happy Days Are Here Again" as the Governor approached the microphone. He spoke very succinctly: "Farmers are important to this country if we are ever to get out of this mess. The President has authorized a new program which will provide assistance to farmers in this county." The Governor proceeded to tell the audience about yet another bureaucratic program that was sure to cure the farmer's ills. The audience responded with polite applause. They had hoped the news would be about new farm markets instead of another program designed to enlarge government. Mr. Jackson, a local farmer, summed it up best: "Looks like we are going to have to build another courthouse, because this one is already filled with government agencies." Even the disappointing speech by the Governor failed to dampen the celebration. The traditional parade was already beginning to form. The courthouse was a fitting monument to the spirit of the people there. A new coat of paint would soon be doused on the economy. At least that seemed to be the pervading view of this small farming community.

“Cantaloupes and watermelons for sale," shouted a teenaged lad. This was a familiar cry in this part of the country. The area’s watermelons and cantaloupes were considered the finest within a twelve-county radius. Today, local residents could dine for free on these tasty treats. The annual celebration, as always, had its share of long-winded speakers. Another monument was being dedicated. This one was to honor those brave soldiers who had fought and died in World War II. The war had been over for four years. The beauty pageant was just getting under way. The mayor had successfully fought to have the winner represent the county in the state beauty contest for the first time. Cars were blocking the parade route and had to be removed by an accommodating tow truck. The courthouse, for the first time, began to resemble an aging landmark. Surrounding structures were springing up everywhere. Some former tenants of the courthouse had moved across town to another location. There was talk of constructing a new building to take its place. Progress had come to this area. People in New York may soon be eating those famous watermelons and cantaloupes. The celebration continued with the courthouse oblivious to all these changes.

It was 1968 and some area residents felt the annual celebration should be postponed. The Vietnam War had stirred a great deal of controversy between the old and young in the community. Families were torn apart by their divergent views. How could an Independence Day celebration be of any meaningful value in such an atmosphere? One of the local politicians sensed that something was needed to charge up this event. He invited one of the more controversial presidential candidates to speak. This candidate's radical views were known widely throughout the country. While his candidacy was anything but serious, his ideas were further fueling an already divided nation. An elevated stage was constructed at the entrance of the courthouse in accordance with the speaker's wishes. The candidate was introduced to the overflowing crowd. "I plan to make this country stronger by winning this war," assured the confidant speaker. "The rights of the working man will be uppermost in my mind when I'm your President. No long-haired hippie radical or whining member of some minority group will have a voice in my administration." A hissing chorus of boos and catcalls poured forth from the crowd. The speaker looked ominously at the distracted mob. With a menacing smile, he said: "When I'm elected President, I will come back to this area and hang all of you anarchists." A hush fell over the audience and they listened to the rest of the speech in almost total silence. The candidate finished and the mayor asked if anyone else had an opposing view. The first speaker was adorned with metals from both World War II and the Korean War. He spoke almost in a whisper: "I may not agree with all of the protest against the war and other issues in our country, but I will defend any American's right to speak out." A thundering applause could be heard as the speaker stepped down from the platform. A young man with shoulder length hair and protruding beard spoke next. "Today, I have heard what America is all about. It is not about stifling opposing viewpoints and beliefs, but about the importance of everyone being allowed to think what they want without being afraid of reprisals." The day was filled with countless other such testimonials. A marching band joined a solitary guitar player for a most unusual version of "America the Beautiful.” A new generation of sounds echoed off the old courthouse until the break of dawn.

The theme of the 1986 celebration was: "SAVE THE OLD COURTHOUSE.” A new county building had finally been built in 1985 and most of the former courthouse occupants had moved out. There had been talk for over forty years of what would become of the courthouse if a new building took its place. Now, the community was faced with the problem of either leveling the beloved structure or finding another use for it. Committees were forming to raise money to maintain the old building and to determine some meaningful ways to make use of its heritage. The once proud steeple was in need of repair. The huge clock had not worked in over three years. This faithful friend to the community was dying a slow death from decay and neglect. If the ornate structure was to see many more Independence Day celebrations, it must have a helping hand. The community had totally mobilized all efforts to see that this old friend would be around for a long time. This year's festivities were centered on the courthouse, much like the first celebration back in 1886. It was time to pay homage to a dear friend.

We are now celebrating Independence Day in the present. The courthouse has had a new steeple since 2000. The tower clock now proudly chimes again. Housed in the courthouse is a new generation of occupants ranging from artists to gourmet cooks. Visitors come from miles around just to admire its renewed beauty. No one can remember when the community was without this magnificent structure. It has been the meeting place for many important events. It has been a stabilizing force for the people in this area. The courthouse stands as a beacon of the past, ready to make many more contributions to this community's heritage.

________________________________________________________

For some, writing is a way of life. For Madisonville resident Mike Barton, it’s also a part-time job and a leisurely love affair. Along with authoring five insightfully written business books, which includes Recognition at WorkBuilding a Fundamentally Sound Corporate Compliance Program, and Incentive Pay: Creating a Competitive Advantage, as well as numerous published articles and short pieces, Mike holds both a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of Evansville. And while Mike’s in-depth sense of business know-how has led him to employment as a teacher/professor, an HR Administrator with Baptist Health Madisonville, and a talented lecturer, he says that he simply loves to write. Period. In turn, the Sugg Street Post recently got in touch with Mike and found that he was interested in submitting some of his works to our website. Of course, we were happy to oblige.

 

Sugg Street Post
Written by Mike Barton
Photo by Jeff Harp

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New Restaurant Moving into Historic Downtown Madisonville Location

MADISONVILLE, KY (6/13/13)—Over the last year, interest in Madisonville’s downtown district has seen a notable upswing. From renovations and expansions, to the addition of several completely new businesses, it seems as though downtown Madisonville is heading in a truly positive direction. In lending even more steam to this commerce-based momentum, a new, family-owned-and-operated restaurant has announced that they will be both renovating and opening up for business in one of the city’s most well-known locations later this year.

Claiming over a 100 years of existence—16 of which were spent as the host to one of Madisonville’s most memorable restaurants, Bartholomew’s—and sporting the expansive “Montpelier” painting and column/stair set on its southernmost side, the historic edifice at 51 South Main Street is a highly recognizable and unique structure that has, unfortunately, remained all but vacant over the past three-and-a-half years.

However, two ambitious area residents, Terry Green and J.P. Wilson, as well as a silent backer, are currently in the process of renovating the location in order to open a dual-level, family-owned-and-operated restaurant and bar tagged under a straightforward, yet catchy, moniker: 51 On Main Bar & Grill.

With a grand opening slated for August 1st, 2013, as well as a soft opening scheduled several days before, the Sugg Street Post got in contact with co-owner and operatorTerry Green to find out the story behind the business, what kind of food and services they plan to provide, what kind of renovations are underway, how many jobs they look to create, and more.

A longtime Paducah resident and a well-seasoned veteran of the food industry, Green, 34, has been employed in several high-level managerial positions with restaurants such as TGI Friday’s, O’Charley’s, and The Oasis Southwest Grill of Madisonville. Yet, for all his experience in the food world, this will be the first time Green has stepped into the role of co-owner—and it’s a transition he remains both excited and humbled by.

“It was really crazy how this all came together. I came back to Madisonville in April and I walked into [property owner] Joe Thomas’s place, which is where we’re moving in, just to look at some antiques he had for sale,” says Green. “Well, Joe found out what I did and I came in there for the next three months to talk with him. Finally, he asked me if I’d ever considered opening up my own restaurant. I told him that I’d thought about it my whole life. But I come from a family that doesn’t have means. It’s not like I come from a well-to-do family, so it’s kind of like a dream to be opening the large-scale restaurant that we’re working on. It’s all been possible because I found a building partner, J.P., and a silent backer who really believed in what we wanted to do. It’s really the American Dream. It just seems like all the cards have fallen into place. I’m so excited that I can’t see straight. [laughs] Things like this just don’t happen every day. I was jumping up and down in my kitchen last night. [laughs]”

So what kind of food and food-related services can the community expect from 51 On Main? As Green explains, the establishment will offer items like hand-cooked steaks, one to two-inch pork chops, a traditional top-notch lunch menu, a variety of drinks, and much more. Additionally, Green says that they hope to utilize a full-scale smoker, which would simultaneously season and cook ribs, fresh fish, and other dinner specials. Services like carry-out, delivery, and on-location services will also be available through the business.

As far as the new restaurant’s aesthetic goes, Green explains that it will essentially be like two different businesses in one location. As both Green and his fellow co-owner, J.P. Wilson, chose the downtown location partly because of its uniquely historic character and architectural design, many of the building’s original features will be displayed and built upon throughout the ground floor. In addition to removing much of the building’s carpeting, which Green says has revealed a stunning layer of decades-old hard pine flooring, the downstairs dining area will play host to a variety of 100-year-old English made tables and a variety of historic photos linked to our local community’s past. Coupling this atmosphere with what he describes as a high-level of hospitality and a variety of aforementioned entrées, Green says that the restaurant’s services will be somewhat akin to one of our region’s most popular food-related destinations: Patti’s 1880 Settlement in Grand Rivers, KY.

Regarding the second-story, mezzanine-style seating area and bar, Green says that the décor will resemble a more modern and hip lounge, replete with comfy seating and a variety of televised entertainment, such as NFL Sunday Ticket games and UFC matches just to name a few. What’s more, Green says customers wishing to simply dine or hangout on the second floor will be able to do so without any issues thanks to a divider between the bar and the general seating/dining area.

Though Green was reluctant to release the company’s total investment in the downtown district, he did explain that it was “very substantial” and that renovations to the building were reaching over $50,000 in total. Furthermore, Green noted that the restaurant and bar will create between 30 and 40 jobs.

And, truly, the concept of improving upon our community—whether it be creating new commerce or providing a fresh source of entertainment—is what lies at the heart of Green’s vision for the business.

“We really want to be active and engaging when it comes to this community, because we want to be a big part of it,” says Green. “We actually want to have some outdoor events too, like live music and fresh-air dining, which is why we’re currently trying to lease the adjacent, outside portions of the building as well. We’re staying open seven days a week and as late as we can, because we want to be open to the public as much as possible, so on nights that we might find it a little slower we might open things up to more of a ‘night life’ feel upstairs. We’re going to have modern furniture up there, so it will have more of a lounge-style feel, and the second floor is huge. Plus, we want to work with the other restaurants and businesses downtown when we can. We want to collaborate with them as much as possible. You know, at the end of the day, we’re just really happy to be doing this. We love Madisonville. My family loves this town and the people are great here. Now, we have the chance to give that back. That’s something that will make you sleep well at night.”

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Want to try some of 51 On Main’s dishes before the grand opening on August 1st? If so, make sure to check them out at Madisonville’s first Friday Night Live event of the season on June 14th in the downtown district.

Interested in employment with 51 On Main? If so, simply pay the location a visit next week and ask about employment options.

Sugg Street Post
Writing/Photos by Luke Short

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nOM—Adventures in Yoga & Food: The Reality Yogi

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (6/6/13) - Practicing yoga is an act of self-care. It is a way to take time – ideally, every day – for connecting with body, mind, and spirit. The reality is, however, that it can be really challenging to make the time for this kind of practice. Especially when it becomes one of those things, and you know all about those things. Things that you think you need a very specific set of circumstances to do correctly. If I lived in my perfect yoga world, every day there would be 90 solid, consecutive minutes, falling exactly three hours after I last ate (a light, healthy, organic, free-range, locally-sourced, gluten/soy/wheat/dairy free meal) in a day that I was perfectly hydrated (but for some amazing yogic reason, I wouldn't have to pee during those 90 minutes) and wearing the perfect yoga outfit (and it would have to be Lululemon from head to toe, because what is more ironic than a $300 yoga outfit?) in a room that had been smudged with (organic) white sage approximately 30 minutes before I began my practice, candles (that I made myself) lit, and a perfect playlist cued up. And of course I'd be on my Manduka Black Mat Pro. Duh.

I think those exact circumstances happened once. Well, except for the Lulu outfit. Oh, and I've never made a candle in my life. And I only just got a Manduka Black Mat Pro a year ago as a birthday gift. But yeah, something like that happened one time. In 1999. That's the ticket.

Okay, it never happened.

And let's face it—it probably never will.

Here is the truth: you don't need the perfect amount of time, the perfect space, the expensive mat, and definitely not the $300 yoga outfit to practice yoga. You don’t even have to make it to one of my classes at the YMCA to practice yoga. You can practice yoga anytime, anywhere. You can practice yoga for ten minutes a day with incredibly positive results.

Let's say it is the end of a long day and you finally have a bit of downtime to yourself. And if we are being honest (and we are, or at least, I am about to be), you are probably likely to grab a glass of wine, maybe some chips, (mmm, chips), definitely a lime La Croix, and sneak a moment to catch up on your DVR. Maybe it's Housewives, Parks & Rec, or a Law & Order: SVU marathon. Or you catch up on your internet-world for a minute—Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, Blogger. Maybe you attempt to do all of this at the same time. All the while you might be thinking, gosh, maybe I should do a bit of yoga. (By the way, if this is true for you, word for word, it also seems that we are the same person!).

So it feels like a choice, then: yoga or guilty-pleasure decompression. I know what I’m more likely to choose.

But it does not have to be a choice—at least not all of the time. Have your wine, have your chips, watch your reality television. Or listen to your favorite music. And while you do, put your legs up the wall for 10 minutes. Or sit cross-legged on the floor and lengthen your spine as breathe deeply (and sip your wine). Or just sit on the couch, watch your favorite show, and focus on inhaling deep into your belly, flaring your rib cage with the breath, and drawing it up over the collar bones, exhaling from the upper chest, rib cage, and following the breath all the way out with the belly.

I'm not saying this should replace your focused practice of yoga, or that you should never step foot in a yoga studio again. But as an addition to a mindful practice, this is a great way to work some additional yoga, gentle stretching, and deep breathing into the reality of your day.

Today, I did some yoga in my kitchen in between folding laundry and drinking coffee, thinking that I need to start eating more celery because it's supposed to be good for your heart—or at least that's what I read in some magazine yesterday.

Luckily, the beauty of yoga is that I stopped thinking about celery and stressing about heart health for a hot second and had a very fleeting moment of blissful peace and concentration.

You can, too.

• Stand with your feet a little wider than your hip’s width apart.
• Begin to twist, allowing the arms to gain momentum like empty coat sleeves of a trench coat draped over your shoulders. Lift the opposite heel as you look behind you.
• Coordinate it with some strong pranayama (breath work) practice—a sharp inhale through the nose as you come through center, a forceful "HA" breath out the mouth as you twist.
• Let the momentum build and build, and let your hands hit you wherever they may (it's probably somewhere you have a big concentration of lymph nodes, and they need a love tap now and then!)
• Continue for a minute or two, then let the momentum slow down, like the battery in the toy is slowly dying.
• When you are finally still, notice how you feel. Breathe deeply.

This incredibly simple twist is so therapeutic and beneficial. It is a nice squeeze and soak for all of the organs in the abdomen, flooding them with freshly oxygenated blood, and it also keeps the spine supple and creates space for all of the nerves traveling out of the spine to the rest of the body. Hooray!

Or go throw on your Lulu clothes, roll out that Manduka, light the candles, smudge the room and have that perfect, enlightening 90-minute practice. I'm jealous already.

Love,
The Reality Yogi

Hilary’s website: www.hilarylowbridge.weebly.com 
Connect with Hilary on Facebook: www.facebook.com/HilaryLowbridgeYoga
Hilary in 140 characters or less: www.twitter.com/hilarybreathes

Sugg Street Post
Written by Hilary Lowbridge
Photos by Hilary Lowbridge

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Business Expanding Downtown, Offering New Services

MADISONVILLE, KY (12/16/12)—Commerce in downtown Madisonville, KY has seen a gradual rise over the last year, and one local business has recently made their plans to expand public.

A popular destination for those seeking bistro-style cuisine, a variety of high-end brews, live music from area artists, and a modern, but welcoming atmosphere, The Crowded House “gastropub” has lived up to its name since opening at 26 W. Center Street over a year ago. As a result of their continued success, and with the hopes of bringing even more “flavor” to the city’s historic district, the downtown eatery will be expanding into a neighboring building at the beginning of 2013. Specifically, employees note that new dishes, drinks, and a larger area for entertainment will be added to the existing layout.

While their original location will be temporarily closed for renovations early next year, The Crowded House will be “satiating” their customers during the transition via several new and useful services.

Starting on Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013, The Crowded House will offer both delivery and curbside service to customers from 10am-2:30pm (Tuesday-Friday). Whereas those ordering delivery are required to provide an address within city limits, curbside orders will be available for pick-up at the restaurant’s back door (adjacent to the US Bank and former Hopkins County Library parking lot). Both services will offer up soups, salads, and sandwiches included on The Crowded House’s menu, which can be found by clicking here.

When the services go into effect, customers can call (270) 825-1178 to place an order.

To stay updated on the latest details of the expansion, make sure to check out The Crowded House’s official Facebook page by clicking here.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photo by Jeff Harp

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Christmas Parade - Shots from the Sidewalk

MADISONVILLE, KY (11/3/12) - On Saturday, December 1st, our community and region came together to kick off the holiday season right, with the 2012 presentation of the Noon-Kiwanis Club-sponsored Madisonville Christmas Parade. As promised, and in honor of the entertaining event, we present to you a continued collection of imagery captured by Sugg Street Post photographer, Jeff Harp. You can also view the initial set of photos, which were released on November 2nd, by clicking here

 

Sugg Street Post
Photos by Jeff Harp

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