Displaying items by tag: live

  • Published in Music

Word on the Street: Basking in Waves of Progress

MADISONVILLE, KY (7/19/13)—Full-spectrum progress is rarely a measurable, down-to-the-speck concept. Oftentimes, authentic progress is evidenced by an anomalous, subjective feeling imparted upon an individual or a collective group through a set of direct or indirect experiences. And it’s the aforementioned sense of subjectivity that’s key, because, like beauty, the notions of development and growth are ultimately in the eye of the beholder. To put it bluntly, it’s up to the observers—the people of Hopkins County and west Kentucky in this case—to recognize and appreciate the encouraging changes around us rather than focusing on the negatives that can tarnish our perceptions.

So, why examine this concept here? And how does this perspective on progress connect with our community?

While I could recount a variety of past experiences that would answer these questions adequately, I’d rather point to something specific that took place a week ago.

It was the night of Friday, July 12th, and myself, as well as a couple of close friends, suddenly found ourselves completely immersed in this peculiar sense of progress as we stood on my back porch in Madisonville, listening to the sounds of positive change emanating from the downtown district.

Yet, it had taken a full day—or perhaps even years in retrospect—ripe with tedious, but rewarding, business-related efforts and enjoyable interaction with people in our community before we were once again led to what has become a fairly familiar realization as of late: our area is growing in the right direction.

Let’s start at the beginning.

Much like any other day, Jessica Dockrey and I completed our summer morning routine, which includes getting my daughter ready for the day, taking her to stay with a member of my family so we can focus on business, eating breakfast upon our return, taking showers, putting some fresh clothes on, and pounding away at a variety of Sugg Street Post-related tasks until the late afternoon. The difference with this particular day, however, was that we would be participating in the City of Madisonville’s second installment of the 2013 Friday Night Live summer concert and entertainment series.

As with the first FNL we attended back in June, we were excited to check out the event’s entertainment lineup and to talk with attendants about the Sugg Street Post. We were also eager to see our friends out at the event having a good time with their families.

So, as the mid-morning quickly turned to late-afternoon, we packed up our table, a banner, some blank note cards for an advertising giveaway, business cards, and a few fold-out chairs, and headed toward the city’s downtown district to set up our booth.

As before, we were lucky enough to have a spot on the corner of Court and Union Streets where we could see the performance stage while also meeting with a variety of FNL patrons.

Though attendance for the event underwent gradual growth throughout the evening, the turnout for the summer concert series, which was made possible via a partnership with Baptist Health Madisonville and the Hopkins County Tourist and Convention Commission, was perhaps the best I’ve seen in four years by the time 7:30pm rolled around.

Along with booths from a variety of businesses and organizations, a motorcycle show hosted by the Hopkins County Central Archery Team on East Center Street, and onsite food and refreshment services—which included the Madisonville-Hopkins County Chamber of Commerce’s beer garden—the event also boasted a three-part musical lineup that included Larry Grisham and The Beat Daddys, Elvis impersonator Brad McCrady, and the acclaimed Boscoe France Band.

Furthermore, we (Jessica, close friend and photographer Jeff Harp, and I) got to meet and talk with a lot of fresh faces that were excited about the Sugg Street Post and the support we try to offer up to the local arts and entertainment scene in western Kentucky. For our fans and supporters, we are truly grateful.

Yet, by the time 8:15pm rolled around, we were physically and mentally exhausted. It was the culmination of a work week that seemed to stretch much farther than five days and we were ready for some down time at home. While we didn’t want to miss what was surely going to be one of the biggest and most anticipated shows of the season—a live performance by Guitar Center’s national 2012 Battle of the Blues winner and Hopkins County native, Boscoe France—we succumbed to our human frailties and packed it up, ready to relax in the comforts of our own home.

With most everything unloaded, we took off our shoes, popped open a couple of brews, and headed out toward the back porch of our home on the south end of town to take in the relaxing sights of the night sky. And as we walked past the threshold some six to seven blocks away from downtown Madisonville and FNL, we were greeted by the soulful howls and bluesy wailing of The Boscoe France Band cutting a smooth grove into the evening air.

We weren’t going to miss the show after all.

I was born here, and I’ve lived in or nearby Madisonville for the majority of my life, but I can honestly say that I’ve never been able to hear music from an event this clearly. Not only could I hear the performance, but it was truly phenomenal music. We all looked at each other and seemed to exclaim the same sentiments in unison, “This is awesome!”

And it truly was awe-inspiring in that moment. To us, it was a sign of where our small town is headed.

Throughout the hour-and-a-half set, we all felt as though we were witness to something special. It was pure. It was evolution. It was a triumph for our local scene wrapped up in a seemingly simple package of sound waves, nice weather, and cool night air. It was about friendship and a shared vision. Sure, there may have been a handful of local folks trying to get some sleep that night, but, on the whole, our town was truly alive. It was electric, loud, and stunning.

We were at home, relaxing in a chair with our feet kicked up, and we could hear the sounds of progress, the rumble of bikes roaring down the streets, the clickety-clack and groan of a train passing through the darkness, reminding us of what a great place we have to call home.

____________________________________________

Want to learn more about Madisonville’s 2013 Friday Night Live summer concert series? If so, click the following link: 

http://www.madisonvillegov.com/Madisonville_Kentucky/index.asp?Page=Friday%20Night%20Live

To learn more about Boscoe France and The Boscie France Band, click here or click the YouTube player attached below this article.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photo provided by Boscoe France

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Word on the Street: Basking in Waves of Progress

MADISONVILLE, KY (7/19/13)—Full-spectrum progress is rarely a measurable, down-to-the-speck concept. Oftentimes, authentic progress is evidenced by an anomalous, subjective feeling imparted upon an individual or a collective group through a set of direct or indirect experiences. And it’s the aforementioned sense of subjectivity that’s key, because, like beauty, the notions of development and growth are ultimately in the eye of the beholder. To put it bluntly, it’s up to the observers—the people of Hopkins County and west Kentucky in this case—to recognize and appreciate the encouraging changes around us rather than focusing on the negatives that can tarnish our perceptions.

So, why examine this concept here? And how does this perspective on progress connect with our community?

While I could recount a variety of past experiences that would answer these questions adequately, I’d rather point to something specific that took place a week ago.

It was the night of Friday, July 12th, and myself, as well as a couple of close friends, suddenly found ourselves completely immersed in this peculiar sense of progress as we stood on my back porch in Madisonville, listening to the sounds of positive change emanating from the downtown district.

Yet, it had taken a full day—or perhaps even years in retrospect—ripe with tedious, but rewarding, business-related efforts and enjoyable interaction with people in our community before we were once again led to what has become a fairly familiar realization as of late: our area is growing in the right direction.

Let’s start at the beginning.

Much like any other day, Jessica Dockrey and I completed our summer morning routine, which includes getting my daughter ready for the day, taking her to stay with a member of my family so we can focus on business, eating breakfast upon our return, taking showers, putting some fresh clothes on, and pounding away at a variety of Sugg Street Post-related tasks until the late afternoon. The difference with this particular day, however, was that we would be participating in the City of Madisonville’s second installment of the 2013 Friday Night Live summer concert and entertainment series.

As with the first FNL we attended back in June, we were excited to check out the event’s entertainment lineup and to talk with attendants about the Sugg Street Post. We were also eager to see our friends out at the event having a good time with their families.

So, as the mid-morning quickly turned to late-afternoon, we packed up our table, a banner, some blank note cards for an advertising giveaway, business cards, and a few fold-out chairs, and headed toward the city’s downtown district to set up our booth.

As before, we were lucky enough to have a spot on the corner of Court and Union Streets where we could see the performance stage while also meeting with a variety of FNL patrons.

Though attendance for the event underwent gradual growth throughout the evening, the turnout for the summer concert series, which was made possible via a partnership with Baptist Health Madisonville and the Hopkins County Tourist and Convention Commission, was perhaps the best I’ve seen in four years by the time 7:30pm rolled around.

Along with booths from a variety of businesses and organizations, a motorcycle show hosted by the Hopkins County Central Archery Team on East Center Street, and onsite food and refreshment services—which included the Madisonville-Hopkins County Chamber of Commerce’s beer garden—the event also boasted a three-part musical lineup that included Larry Grisham and The Beat Daddys, Elvis impersonator Brad McCrady, and the acclaimed Boscoe France Band.

Furthermore, we (Jessica, close friend and photographer Jeff Harp, and I) got to meet and talk with a lot of fresh faces that were excited about the Sugg Street Post and the support we try to offer up to the local arts and entertainment scene in western Kentucky. For our fans and supporters, we are truly grateful.

Yet, by the time 8:15pm rolled around, we were physically and mentally exhausted. It was the culmination of a work week that seemed to stretch much farther than five days and we were ready for some down time at home. While we didn’t want to miss what was surely going to be one of the biggest and most anticipated shows of the season—a live performance by Guitar Center’s national 2012 Battle of the Blues winner and Hopkins County native, Boscoe France—we succumbed to our human frailties and packed it up, ready to relax in the comforts of our own home.

With most everything unloaded, we took off our shoes, popped open a couple of brews, and headed out toward the back porch of our home on the south end of town to take in the relaxing sights of the night sky. And as we walked past the threshold some six to seven blocks away from downtown Madisonville and FNL, we were greeted by the soulful howls and bluesy wailing of The Boscoe France Band cutting a smooth grove into the evening air.

We weren’t going to miss the show after all.

I was born here, and I’ve lived in or nearby Madisonville for the majority of my life, but I can honestly say that I’ve never been able to hear music from an event this clearly. Not only could I hear the performance, but it was truly phenomenal music. We all looked at each other and seemed to exclaim the same sentiments in unison, “This is awesome!”

And it truly was awe-inspiring in that moment. To us, it was a sign of where our small town is headed.

Throughout the hour-and-a-half set, we all felt as though we were witness to something special. It was pure. It was evolution. It was a triumph for our local scene wrapped up in a seemingly simple package of sound waves, nice weather, and cool night air. It was about friendship and a shared vision. Sure, there may have been a handful of local folks trying to get some sleep that night, but, on the whole, our town was truly alive. It was electric, loud, and stunning.

We were at home, relaxing in a chair with our feet kicked up, and we could hear the sounds of progress, the rumble of bikes roaring down the streets, the clickety-clack and groan of a train passing through the darkness, reminding us of what a great place we have to call home.

____________________________________________

Want to learn more about Madisonville’s 2013 Friday Night Live summer concert series? If so, click the following link:

http://www.madisonvillegov.com/Madisonville_Kentucky/index.asp?Page=Friday%20Night%20Live

To learn more about Boscoe France and The Boscie France Band, click here or click the YouTube player attached below this article.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photo provided by Boscoe France

Read more...

First ‘Summer Fest’ in Downtown Madisonville

MADISONVILLE, KY (6/25/13)—Summer is in full swing and the good times just keep on rolling. From the first annual Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival/Red Cross benefit held on June 15th to Madisonville’s monthly Friday Night Live concert and summer entertainment series, as well as Madisonville’s upcoming 4th Fest celebration, it seems like the entertainment options available to regional residents are really starting to heat up as of late.

But what is one to do in between these events? An excellent option is coming up this Saturday: Relay For Life’s first-ever "Summer Fest."

Organized by both the First United Methodist Church’s Relay For Life (RFL) team and Madisonville-based performer, Ray Ligon, the RFL Summer Fest will bring a bevy of live music, food, refreshments, and family-friendly entertainment to the corner of Sugg and Main Streets in downtown Madisonville on Saturday, June 29th. And it’s all for a noble and humanitarian cause: finding a cure for cancer.

“Cancer affects everyone. It’s a very widespread issue. For the most part, we all know someone—whether it’s a family member or a friend—who has been affected by cancer at some point in their life,” explains First United Methodist Church’s longtime RFL Team Captain and event organizer, Laura Armstrong. “Statistically speaking, 1,500 Americans are diagnosed with some form of cancer every 24 hours and, out of that group, 500 will die. It’s a very unfortunate statistic and that’s what Relay For Life is trying to put an end to.”

Along with lemonade, sandwich, t-shirt, cook book, and scarf sales—as well as face painting, a chalk area, and other youth-based activities—the RFL Summer Fest will also play host to performances by six talented musicians and groups from the Madisonville area. A list of each group and/or performer with their scheduled set times can be found below:

3pm – Hope Alive Praise Team
4pm – Cody Melton
5pm – Mollie Garrigan
6pm – Spencer Holley
7pm – Madisonville Mayor David Jackson
8pm – Ray Ligon

“Laura Armstrong asked me what I thought about putting an event like this together and if I would help with the music. I wanted to help out, so we tossed around a couple of dates and finally came up with the 29th,” says country-style singer-songwriter and charity-minded performer, Ray Ligon. “I got the info from her and made the request to the city of Madisonville, and it was approved last week at the city council meeting.”

And as Ligon explains to the Sugg Street Post, his involvement with the first RFL Summer Fest was inspired by both compassion and personal experience.

“I believe in helping out with a good cause when I am able, especially when that cause is to help fight cancer,” says Ligon. “My dad died from Lymphoma cancer, so this is close to home for me. Plus, an event like this will not only help to raise funds for much needed research, as well as other areas that help those affected, but it will also show the rest of the community that we care about folks and want to see an end to cancer someday.”

Echoing Ray’s heartfelt sentiment, another Madisonville resident and talented performer who will be playing during the Summer Fest, Cody Melton, says he also has personal reasons for getting involved.

“My dad, Barry ‘Bluesman’ Melton, recently died of cancer and that’s a big part of why I chose to get involved with Relay For Life’s Summer Fest,” says Melton. “I’ll also be playing a cancer-based benefit at the Ballard Convention Center on August 17th to help support the family of 14-year-old Tristin Spindler. He was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma bone cancer and it has spread from his hips to his lungs.”

In addition to performing an approximately 45 minute set during the event, Melton will also be offering up both a free guitar and an autographed flyer to a lucky attendant who registers at his merchandise table.

“Kids can put their names in a big bowl I’ll have at my merchandise booth, which will be ran by volunteer Julie Cummings, and I will draw a name out after my set. The person I draw will win a starter First Act brand guitar that I personally set up,” says Cody. “It’s the least I can do to get people out to the event. Plus, I want to spread the joy of music in the hopes of keeping peoples’ spirits high while also helping to raise money to see a cure one day.”

Though several volunteers will be participating in the event, Armstrong and Ligon urge more area residents to get involved with the festival if possible. Specifically, Armstrong mentions that the First United Methodist Church RFL team is currently searching for a caricature artist who would be willing to donate both their time and some supplies to the event.

If you would like to help out in anyway, or if know of someone who might be able to volunteer their artistic skills for a good cause, please contact Laura Armstrong by phone at (270) 871-5063.

“It is my prayer that this coming Saturday will be a tremendous boost for the cause,” adds Ligon. “I hope that we have Sugg Street just crowded like crazy by a mess of folks who care about their community and raising awareness about the fight against cancer.”

The first-ever RFL Summer Fest will be held on the corner of Sugg and Main Streets (in front of the Montpelier panting) in downtown Madisonville on June 29th. The event will last from 3pm to 9pm and is completely free to attend, though donations are encouraged and appreciated. 

And even if you can’t make it out to this weekend’s entertaining, benefit-style event, you can show your support for our local Relay For Life by clicking here or by visiting their official Facebook page.

To RSVP to the RFL Summer Fest via Facebook, click the following link: https://www.facebook.com/events/469165966508246/.

If you’d like to learn more about Ray Ligon and his music, click here for a full-length interview courtesy of the Sugg Street Post.

If you’d like to read an in-depth interview with Madisonville Mayor David Jackson, who is also a talented singer/guitarist, click the following article title: American Exceptionalism—An Inside Look at Mayor David Jackson.

To check out coverage of a relatively recent collaborative concert held in Madisonville, which featured Cody Melton and Mollie Garrigan—both of which will be performing at the RFL Summer Fest—click the following article title: Creating Community with Electric Synergy.

For an interview and photos of Mollie Garrigan courtesy of the Sugg Street Post, click the following article title: Mollie Garrigan—Merging Two Worlds.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Ray Ligon photo courtesy of Jeff Harp

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  • Published in Music

Mollie Garrigan—Merging Two Worlds

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (12/28/12)—Blending elements of classic jazz, blues, rock, gospel, and soul with a profound academic approach to music theory and composition, Madisonville musician Mollie Garrigan puts forth all she’s got when it comes to songwriting and performing onstage—a truth many witnessed this past weekend as Mollie played her third live set at The Crowded House gastropub.

From heart-rending takes on hymnals and country ballads, to a commanding cover of Guns N’ Roses’ hit, “Sweet Child of Mine,” Garrigan’s voice and accompanying guitar chords easily cut through the din of her patrons with a powerful, but soothing serenity.

Though born in Ohio, Mollie moved to her family’s home of Madisonville in 1980 where she attended and graduated from North-Hopkins High School. With a years-long interest in music as inspiration, she became a member of MNHHS’s award-winning band program and also performed in the school’s choir. But her interest didn’t stop there. After graduating, Mollie went on to study French horn and voice at Cumberland College in Williamsburg, KY and the University of Alabama in Birmingham, where she came away with a degree in music technology. It was also around this time that Mollie says she did some traveling, learned to play guitar, and started performing around Birmingham in a duo called Jeremiah.

As a solo performer today, Mollie says she is convinced that music and a successful education walk hand-in-hand.

“When I was in school, if band had only been part of the year, it would have affected my learning style. For me, I need that creative outlet to learn, and being in the music program in school is what motivated me more than anything,” says Mollie. “For a long time, they have been trying to remove music from schools completely, so addressing the academic benefits music can impart on students might be a step toward ending that school of thought.”

However, and as Mollie agrees, true musical art is composed of more than technical know-how alone.

When I asked her if someone needs both a traditional education in music and a real “feel” for what they’re playing, Mollie responded by saying, “I don’t know that you need to have both sides to be talented, but I am aware of music’s undercurrent, so to speak. To me, it’s like learning another language. Music’s really fluent, really easy, artistic, and beautiful, but it’s really hard to learn the basics and the technical side. I studied music theory and composition pretty intensely. At the same time, I’ve heard a lot of incredible musicians who have not studied a day in their life. From my perspective, I’m appreciative to have an understanding of what goes into it from both sides—from sheer emotion bursting forth from your soul, like joy or despair, to creating something intentionally from it. Having that knowledge when you’re trying to teach someone how to play is important, too. As I teach private lessons, knowing the technical side of music really comes in handy.”

So, as a “newer,” yet talented and experienced solo artist in the Hopkins County region, I asked Mollie how our community’s music and arts scene could be improved upon. Echoing many other artists in our area and region, a desire for more music venues and opportunities to share art with the public came to mind.

“I think we need more places like The Crowded House. Basically, we just need more venues, like additional restaurants, coffee shops, bars, and even what you guys are trying to do with the Sugg Street Post. I go to Applebee’s and sing karaoke—and it’s fun—but it’s just not the same. I just think there needs to be more opportunities for artists and people in general, and I believe there are more people wanting to do that now, which is really great.”

Adding to this sentiment, Mollie notes how pleased she is to see people in our community taking the initiative to bring more culture to our everyday lives.

“I’m glad to be here and I feel very at home in Madisonville. As I told Jessica [Dockrey in a past interview], I’ve had 20 years of experience in the ‘big city’ and I’ve lived part of my life here, so I love seeing how the two worlds are merging. Having a small town with culture is possible; people have done it successfully. For now, we just have to keep on chipping away.”

Want to catch Mollie Garrigan live? Keep an eye on the Sugg Street Post's "The Lounge" and "Events" categories for future performance dates.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos by Jeff Harp

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