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West Kentucky Wild: Deer Hunter Support Sought for Charitable Food-Based Ministry

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (8/5/13)—Wanted: West Kentucky deer hunters’ support for the 2013-2014 "Want Not Waste Not" charitable food campaign.

With the 2013-2014 deer season rapidly approaching (archery season kicks it off on September 7th), local deer hunters’ attentions will be turning to preparation for the upcoming season. The excitement begins to build as the days get shorter, nights get a little cooler, and the leaves begin their changing process. Thoughts of harvesting that trophy buck dominate our dreams. Though the 2013 Kentucky Statewide deer tag allows a hunter to take two deer—one antlered and one antlerless—seldom is that second tag ever used. However, the “Want Not Waste Not" ministry hopes to change that.

Having heard somewhat about the program, I wanted to find out more. So this past Saturday, August 3rd, between weeding flower gardens and the PBS 7pm showing of "Elvis from Hawaii,” my better half and I headed to the Ballard Convention Center in Madisonville, KY for a sportsman's bash.

We browsed the many different vendors displaying their wares and services. I enjoyed eating a bagged taco from the Hope2All concession stand. I have to say, those ladies are really good salespeople.

We eventually cornered Chad Browning, founder of "Want Not Waste Not.” Chad was more than happy to talk about this program.

He explained how he and his wife, Tonita, were driving down one of the Peabody coal roads during the opening weekend of the 2011 season and came upon three abandoned camp sites that contained a total of seven complete deer carcasses. As an ethical hunter, this was very disturbing to Chad. To make matters worse, Hope2All community food bank was asking for people to donate any processed deer at the time. This was the birth of the "Want Not Waste Not" ministry God called upon the Brownings to create.

During the 2012 season alone, a total of 61 deer were donated. However, Chad anticipates collecting 150 or more this year.


“By partnering with Hope2All to distribute the processed deer, we can concentrate on collection and raising funds as it takes $60 for each deer processed,” said Chad. “The final product is ground venison mixed with beef fat in two pound bags.”

Want to donate a deer to this worthwhile cause? If so, read up on the following guidelines:

1. Your deer must be field dressed. If the current temperature is 50+ degrees, add a couple of bags of ice to the chest cavity if possible.

2. You must use your tag. Call the tele-check line at 1-800-245-4263 and get your confirmation number before you call.

3. Call Chad Browning at (270) 635-0544. Be prepared to give your name, phone number, area/location, and your confirmation number. Leave a message if necessary.

4. The WNWN ministry also offers deer donation pick up services that cover both Hopkins and Muhlenberg County. They also accept deer from other counties when possible. Call them at the number listed above and they can direct you to where to take it.

“We are currently working with three processors: Livingston Meats in Hopkinsville, KY; Barnes Processing in Beaver Dam, KY; and Yoder’s Custom Meats in Sebree, KY,” says Chad. “They will accept the deer without any issue. Just tell them it’s a donation for the ‘Want Not Waste Not’ program.”

Not a hunter, but still want to show your support of this charitable minsitry? Tax deductible donations are also accepted. In fact, a gift of $60.00 takes the deer from the forest to the dinner table of a local family in need.

Make all checks payable to the following address:

Hope2All
200 North Main Street
Nortonville, KY 42442

If you would like to volunteer your time or donate a deer, please call (270) 635-0544.

To learn more about the WNWN ministry or Hope2ALL, please visit this link: http://www.hope2all.com/. You can also find the WNWN ministry on Facebook by clicking here: https://www.facebook.com/WantNotWasteNot.

Additional photos from the outdoors festival held at the Ballard Convention Center in Madisonville, KY this past weekend are attached below.

________________________________________

A former Kentucky State BASS Federation Champ and longtime outdoorsman, Nick Short has spent over five decades learning the ins and outs of the hunting and fishing world. From coon-hunting as a youth, to hanging with fishing pros as an adult, Nick knows a thing or two about how it’s done outdoors. Want to know his secrets? Check out his latest installment of “West Kentucky Wild.”

To read other “West Kentucky Wild” installments, visit Nick’s Sugg Street Post blog page by clicking here: http://www.suggstreetpost.com/index.php/outdoors-west-kentucky-wild

Sugg Street Post
Written by Nick Short
Photos by Nick Short/Want Not Waste Not

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  • Published in Music

Clarksville's 'Coup' Brings Progressive Thought Downtown

PHOTO: The Coup's College Street location.

CLARKSVILLE, TN (6/26/13)—Within five minutes of walking into the new location for The Coup, I was horizontal on the venue's floor with Zach Lerman, Matt Watkins, and Josh Williams experiencing how cold tiles can get when air-conditioned.

I was happy to get some relief from the humid, hot weather outside, but I was still fairly surprised by what was going on.

I wasn't surprised by the fact that I was starting an interview with a few small business owners by collectively laying down on their tile floor—The Coup has been hell-bent on breaking conventions for the last five years—it was the room's air conditioning and the floor's cleanliness that surprised me.

The Coup never had much control over the climate of its former College Street location—heat lamps kept people warm in the winter while every set in the summer was punctuated by a mass exodus of people to the fresh air outside—but The Coup's crew has picked up a new set of keys.

And beyond just adding air conditioning and heating, The Coup has taken on a location that will be the biggest step towards engaging the greater Clarksville community that the music venue/community center/restaurant has taken.

With Clarksville’s conservative establishment in their backyard, the new location will likely test the owners of The Coup—their current cash-strapped status won't make it any easier—but the move will also offer big opportunities, both to Clarksville and The Coup.

An Outpost of Progressive Thought

The Coup's movement over the last five years—from the outer fringes of downtown on Crossland Avenue and College Street to the heart of Clarksville on University Avenue—is material evidence of the journey The Coup has taken since it was founded five years ago.

Lerman and the rest of the management had the freedom to be nearly as wild as they wanted when they were running a dirty venue in one of Clarksville's poorer neighborhoods. And that's what it seems like the founders were looking to do: have a place to get weird.

PHOTO: The Coup's first location on Crossland Avenue.

At first, The Coup was strictly a music venue. They hosted shows, but didn't serve food or alcohol. They eventually wanted to get a beer license, but they found out that they would have to get a restaurant license as well in order to keep the venue all ages.

So they went nearly bankrupt getting both licenses.

After three years on Crossland Avenue, they picked up and moved to College Street, a move that told Clarksville they were no longer content being a concealed outpost of progressive thought.

Their new perch on College Street, while not in downtown, was essentially a welcome sign for people heading towards the center of Clarksville. Whether or not they were interested, the average Clarksville resident saw what was going on at The Coup.

When Lerman set up a PA on The Coup's front deck to broadcast his monologues, passing motorists had no choice but to hear diatribes against corporate America. Drivers had no ignore button to press when they saw The Coup's patrons playing with fire or massive hula hoops in the parking lot.

And this third move will bring The Coup and its message even closer to the culture of Clarksville that it so often rails against. For better or worse, Clarksville's finest will now be at The Coup's door faster than ever before and Clarksville's leaders will have a tougher time ignoring what happens at one of the city's only bastions of liberal, progressive thought.

The implications of this move don't seem to be lost on the people behind The Coup.

PHOTO (from left): Matt Watkins, Josh Williams, Xanthi Diamond and Zach Lerman

"Dan Choi [one of The Coup's volunteers/employees] made the comment, 'Oh we're about to move here. Time to make some new friends and some new enemies.' That sounds about right," Lerman said. "Some people will like it and some people will not like it."

Lerman's attitude betrays a confidence that him and the rest of The Coup's owners—Stacy Gazenski, Kory Kyle, and Matt Watkins—have gained since they set up shop five years ago. The Coup is no longer a place to hide out from the establishment—it's becoming an institution that wants to be noticed.

More Than a Venue

The Coup's latest move may be its furthest step towards central Clarksville, but it's also the completion of a circle. Lerman got his start promoting shows at the new University Avenue location when it housed The Icehouse bar.

"I was always trying to book shows and stuff, but it was really stupid because nobody really wanted it," Lerman said. "So this was just a place I already knew. I knew people that worked here. I knew the owner."

But The Coup will look far different when it returns to The Icehouse's former location. Shows will still be put on, but it's more accurate to call The Coup a community center than a venue.

Depending on when you were at The Coup's College Street location, you could see people gardening, doing yoga, reciting poetry, playing trivia, belly dancing, meditating, riding bicycles, falling off unicycles, spinning hula hoops or playing with fire.

And food has moved far from its humble beginnings as an item on a legal checklist.

Some of the best bread in Clarksville comes out of The Coup's kitchen now that Josh Williams has been added to The Coup's management and a constantly shifting menu has given Clarksville its first seasonal, vegetarian-friendly eatery.

Williams brought serious kitchen tools into the College Street location, but, with the addition of a professional gas stove and oven, this move will give The Coup its biggest culinary step up.

And that means that when The Coup opens its University Avenue doors, it won't just be bringing liberal politics and avante-garde music to downtown—it'll be putting quality, handcrafted food in what is nearly a good-food desert.

The Coup's homemade bread will stand out against The Blackhorse's ready-made pizza—downtown's most popular pizza place doesn't make it's own dough—and The Coup's emphasis on real, locally-sourced ingredients will be a stark contrast against The Gilroy's provel-cheese-covered menu.

The Coup has been one of Clarksville's earliest supporters of craft beer, but they won't be alone on University Avenue. Clarksville's most carefully-curated beer menu will be next door at The Pea Patch, and even The Gilroy, with it's penchant for highly-processed cheese and corporate pop music, which has embraced craft beer.

But there's talk of acquiring a wine and liquor license at The Coup—if that happens and The Coup stays to their usual ethos, that will mean that Clarksville will finally have a place to get great quality, local beer, food, wine, and liquor in one place.

And that's something that will stretch The Coup's appeal beyond its usual clientele.

If they can keep their quality up and not scare off University Avenue's foot traffic—and that second point is a fairly big if—The Coup could become the most popular food spot downtown.

PHOTO: A look inside The Coup's new location.

The pieces are there for The Coup to flourish in their new location, but, with money increasingly tight, nothing is guaranteed.

"We don't have any money right now," Lerman said. "We're just throwing every penny and every borrowed penny we have into opening this place in the hopes that it will be successful."

But this isn't the first time that The Coup has been down to their last dollar—family and friend donations have propped the venture up at various points—and money has never really been The Coup's inspiration.

"We were really extensive about our business plan. We did all the numbers and projections and everything... the numbers never ever actually worked out," Lerman said. "We would do the math hundreds of times and it just came up like, this is not going to work."

But five years later, The Coup is still working and the community around it is still growing.

"We get a lot of good reviews from Nashville bands that like to play here, mostly because of the people," Lerman said, "and that has generally been what has kept this place alive—people that actually care and are involved and feel like they belong. And it's not necessarily a certain type of person, but a common theme: open-mindedness."

Liberate Te Ex Jesse Smith, Methdad, Terror Pigeon Dance Revolt, and Little Ruckus are kicking off the new Coup with a $3 show this Thursday, June 27th at 9pm.

Thursday night we'll be the weirdest University Ave has gotten in years—here's to hoping it's only the first of many weird nights.

Sugg Street Post
Writing/Photos by Klaus von Sprekels

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Glema Center Unveils Impressive 2013-14 Lineup, Tickets Available Online

MADISONVILLE, KY (6/24/13) - The Madisonville Community College Glema Mahr Center for the Arts announces its 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!” From the figurative “Ring of Fire” to the Kenya Safari Acrobats literally jumping through flame, this season promises to be sizzling! Headliners this season include the Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug), Gloria Gaynor, and Rick Springfield.

The other “HOT” news is that the Glema now has online ticketing! Patrons can purchase tickets from the comfort of home, by phone, or in person. Tickets go on sale to current package buyers July 8, new package buyers July 22, and single tickets go on sale July 29. The Everything Ticket is only $350 for 20 performances and saves $115 off of the single ticket cost. Please call (270) 821-2787 or visit http://www.glemacenter.org for more information on the Center’s offerings.

There is still one more show left in the 2012-13 Season! The Glema Center’s community theatre production of Rodgers’ & Hammerstein’s The King & I runs July 19-21!


Glema Mahr Center for the Arts 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!”


Center Stage Series

The Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug)
Friday, September 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $45/$40

What began as a group of studio musicians getting together just for fun quickly evolved into The Time Jumpers becoming Nashville legends! The group earned a loyal following for their lively take on classic Western swing and old-school country music.
Sponsored by Old National Bank

Ring of Fire: The Life & Music of Johnny Cash
Friday, September 27, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $26/$21
Touching on the life and times of one of the world’s most legendary musical artists, Johnny Cash, the musical revue “Ring of Fire” is considered one of the best “jukebox musicals” of our time. Although Cash himself is never impersonated, Ring of Fire features a company of performers that will guide you on a journey through Cash’s storied life and celebrated music. With smashing medleys and bounce in its guitar-driven energy, this show will have you stompin’ your feet and asking for more! (Sponsored by Hudson Automotive)

Sarah Council Dance Projects-Featuring music performed by Carla Gover & Anna Gevalt-Roberts
Saturday, November 16, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 general admission
Sarah Council Dance Projects is a project-based dance company founded in 2007 by choreographer Sarah Council as a platform to create emotionally and physically honest dance performance works. These dances explore and reflect life’s poignant moments, from the beautiful to the tragic, and the curious to the absurd. (Sponsored by Juanita Badgett Performing Arts Endowment; Residency Support by the Estates of Ruth and Sue Anne Salmon. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council)

Gloria Gaynor-Christmas with the Queen of Disco
Friday, December 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $40/$35

“I Will Survive” climbed to the top of Billboard’s Pop Charts in 1979, claiming the #1 position on two different occasions. Little did Gloria Gaynor know at the time, the song would eventually become a rallying cry for social survival and remain as relevant today as it was three decades ago. The inspiring single is just the tip of the iceberg where this talented performer’s repertoire is concerned. (Sponsored by Hopkins County Tourist & Convention Commission; Additional Support Provided by the Enduring Legacy of Mrs. Glema Mahr)

H.M.S. Pinafore Presented by New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, Albert Bergeret, Artistic Director
Thursday, March 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $28/$24 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Now. Sea. Here. Ride a wave of music and laughter as romantic sailors, sisters, cousins, and aunts sing and dance their way across the deck of the fanciful British naval vessel with the improbable name. If you liked NYGASP’s productions of “The Mikado” and “Pirates of Penzance”, you’ll love the humor and beautiful music of Gilbert & Sullivan’s first masterpiece! (Sponsored by Anne P. Baker Endowment for Sustained Excellence in the Arts)

Rick Springfield
Friday, April 11, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $50/$45

For all of his accomplishments as an actor, best-selling author and documentary subject, Rick Springfield has always insisted his first love is music. With 25 million albums sold and 17 Top 40 hits, including the 1981 #1 hit “Jessie’s Girl”, (which earned him a Grammy for Best Male Rock Vocal), it is evident music is indeed his great love. (Sponsored by Baptist Health Madisonville)

US Bank Family Specials

A Children’s Nutcracker Presented by Children’s Center for Dance Education
Tuesday, December 10, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $16/$12 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Tchaikovsky’s famous ballet is performed by children for children. Children’s Center for Dance Education and local dancers celebrate this timeless classic. Auditions for local children will be held Sunday, September 29, 2013 at 2 p.m.

Kenya Safari Acrobats
Friday, April 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $18/$14 (Children 12 & under half-price)

The Kenya Safari Acrobats offer a truly unique cultural experience. They perform a non-stop ride of gravity-defying human pyramids, balancing, tumbling, limbo dancing, hurling through hoops and breathtaking contortions, all while clapping to a joyful Benga beat. Combining artistry with humor and playfulness, these gymnasts are a huge crowd pleaser!

Glema Mahr Chamber Music Series

Sonya Baker-Soprano
Thursday, October 3, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Sonya Gabrielle Baker, noted for her performances of American classical vocal music, has been heard in concert both nationally and internationally, from appearances in Carnegie Hall to the Kremlin.

Sarah E. Geller-Violin
Saturday, November 23, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Described as “a consummate artist performing with convincing vigor and passion,” violinist Sarah E. Geller has performed to critical acclaim coast to coast.

Sara Sant’Ambrogio-Cello
Thursday, February 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Grammy Award-winning cellist Sara Sant’Ambrogio has performed throughout the world at major music centers and festivals and is a founding member of the Eroica Trio.

Pavel Kolesnikov-Piano, 2012 Honens Prize Laureate
Thursday, April 3, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

The Telegraph (London) describes 2012 Honens Prize Laureate pianist Pavel Kolesnikov’s playing as having “brilliance, but also a caressing, almost sly intimacy.”

Hancock Bank & Trust Coffeehouse Series

Robin & Linda Williams-Americana
Tuesday, October 15, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

For more than three decades now, These “Prairie Home Companion” regulars have made it their mission to perform the music that they love, “a robust blend of bluegrass, folk, old-time and acoustic country that combines wryly observant lyrics with a wide-ranging melodicism.”

Jane L. Powell-Goddess of Soul
Friday, November 8, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

“A certain talent comes along every 20 years or so, and Jane is it.” Tony Bennett
Ms. Powell quickly captivates any audience with her musical flexibility, open and playful personality, and spicy, spontaneous sense of humor.

Tiempo Libre-Latin Jazz
Saturday, February 1, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

This three-time Grammy-nominated Cuban music group is one of the hottest young bands today. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council.

Ben Sollee-Genre-bending Cello & Vocals
Saturday, March 22, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Known for his thrilling cello playing that incorporates new techniques to create a unique mix of folk, bluegrass, jazz and R&B, Ben Sollee possesses rough, smooth, smoky vocal stylings and a knack for intricate arrangements.

First United Bank and Trust Proud Partnerships

Hairspray! presented by Hopkins County Central High School Fine Arts Department
Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Book by Mark O’Donnell & Thomas Meehan, Music & Lyrics by Marc Shaiman, Lyrics by Scott Wittman
Can a larger-than-life adolescent manage to vanquish the local TV dance program’s reigning princess, integrate the television show, and find true love (singing and dancing all the while, of course!) without mussing her hair? Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Willy Wonka presented by Madisonville North Hopkins High School Music Department
Friday, March 14, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, March 15, 2014 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Music and Lyrics by Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley, Adapted for the Stage by Timothy Allen McDonald & Leslie Bricusse
Roald Dahl’s timeless story of the world-famous candy man and his quest to find an heir comes to life in this stage adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which features the songs from the classic family film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Community Theatre
(Permanent support for Community Theatre provided by J.B. & Kiel Moore Community Programs Endowment)

I’m Not Rappaport by Herb Gardner-Dinner Theatre
February 20-22, 2014 ∙ 6:30 p.m.
Tickets: (includes dinner) $22

This Tony award-winning play takes a humorous, yet poignant look at dreams and the realities of aging through the eyes of two octogenarians. Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. (Sponsored by Dick & Phyllis Frymire and Ralph & Sue Mitchell)

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
July 18 & 19, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ July 20, 2014 ∙ 2 p.m.
Tickets: $16 (general admission)

Music & lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Book by Hugh Wheeler
A rare instance of a musical thriller, the Glema proudly presents Stephen Sondheim’s chilling, suspenseful, heart-pounding masterpiece of murderous “barberism” and culinary crime. The sophisticated and breath-taking music mixes with visceral drama and deliciously funny moments of dark humor. You’ll find yourself laughing hysterically before gasping in surprise. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International. Recommended for ages 14 and up due to violence and mature themes. (Sponsored by Don & Mary Susan Fishman)

Special Events

Back 2 School Bash
Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 4–10 p.m.
Free Admission (Bring your lawn chairs)

Join us for this annual celebration of local talent featuring Guitar Center’s 2012 Battle of the Blues winner, Boscoe France, as this year’s Headliner.
(Sponsored by the Miner Family Arts Endowment)

A Community Christmas-MCC Singers & Local Ensembles
Friday, December 6, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Join us for this annual tradition as local choral groups team up with community-based instrumental ensembles to ring in the Season.
(Sponsored by United Southern Bank Additional support provided by Mrs. Betty Trover, Allen & Pam Rudd, Barry & Gail Eveland, Dr. & Mrs. J.L. Hamman, & Dr. Judith L. Rhoads)

Kristen Iverson-Author of Full Body Burden
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Kristen Iversen is the author of Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats, a finalist for the Barnes & Noble Discover Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence. Ms. Iverson holds a Ph.D from the University of Denver and is an associate professor at the University of Memphis, where she directs the MFA program in creative writing. Full Body Burden has been chosen as MCC’s “Common Reader” for the 2013-14 academic year.

The Anne P. Baker Gallery

August 17-October 4, 2013
Glema Center Juried Art Exhibit & Glema Center Juried Photography Exhibit
Reception & Awards, Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 2 p.m.

Permanent support for gallery exhibits provided by the Robbie P. Ruby Memorial Endowment.

Information about exhibits throughout the year, as well as any of the events mentioned above, are available at www.glemacenter.org

Sugg Street Post
Information/lineup provided by the Glema Mahr Center for the Arts via Brad Downall

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  • Published in Art

Glema Center Unveils Impressive 2013-14 Lineup, Tickets Available Online

MADISONVILLE, KY (6/24/13) - The Madisonville Community College Glema Mahr Center for the Arts announces its 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!” From the figurative “Ring of Fire” to the Kenya Safari Acrobats literally jumping through flame, this season promises to be sizzling! Headliners this season include the Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug), Gloria Gaynor, and Rick Springfield.

The other “HOT” news is that the Glema now has online ticketing! Patrons can purchase tickets from the comfort of home, by phone, or in person. Tickets go on sale to current package buyers July 8, new package buyers July 22, and single tickets go on sale July 29. The Everything Ticket is only $350 for 20 performances and saves $115 off of the single ticket cost. Please call (270) 821-2787 or visit http://www.glemacenter.org for more information on the Center’s offerings.

There is still one more show left in the 2012-13 Season! The Glema Center’s community theatre production of Rodgers’ & Hammerstein’s The King & I runs July 19-21!


Glema Mahr Center for the Arts 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!”


Center Stage Series

The Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug)
Friday, September 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $45/$40

What began as a group of studio musicians getting together just for fun quickly evolved into The Time Jumpers becoming Nashville legends! The group earned a loyal following for their lively take on classic Western swing and old-school country music.
Sponsored by Old National Bank

Ring of Fire: The Life & Music of Johnny Cash
Friday, September 27, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $26/$21
Touching on the life and times of one of the world’s most legendary musical artists, Johnny Cash, the musical revue “Ring of Fire” is considered one of the best “jukebox musicals” of our time. Although Cash himself is never impersonated, Ring of Fire features a company of performers that will guide you on a journey through Cash’s storied life and celebrated music. With smashing medleys and bounce in its guitar-driven energy, this show will have you stompin’ your feet and asking for more! (Sponsored by Hudson Automotive)

Sarah Council Dance Projects-Featuring music performed by Carla Gover & Anna Gevalt-Roberts
Saturday, November 16, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 general admission
Sarah Council Dance Projects is a project-based dance company founded in 2007 by choreographer Sarah Council as a platform to create emotionally and physically honest dance performance works. These dances explore and reflect life’s poignant moments, from the beautiful to the tragic, and the curious to the absurd. (Sponsored by Juanita Badgett Performing Arts Endowment; Residency Support by the Estates of Ruth and Sue Anne Salmon. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council)

Gloria Gaynor-Christmas with the Queen of Disco
Friday, December 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $40/$35

“I Will Survive” climbed to the top of Billboard’s Pop Charts in 1979, claiming the #1 position on two different occasions. Little did Gloria Gaynor know at the time, the song would eventually become a rallying cry for social survival and remain as relevant today as it was three decades ago. The inspiring single is just the tip of the iceberg where this talented performer’s repertoire is concerned. (Sponsored by Hopkins County Tourist & Convention Commission; Additional Support Provided by the Enduring Legacy of Mrs. Glema Mahr)

H.M.S. Pinafore Presented by New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, Albert Bergeret, Artistic Director
Thursday, March 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $28/$24 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Now. Sea. Here. Ride a wave of music and laughter as romantic sailors, sisters, cousins, and aunts sing and dance their way across the deck of the fanciful British naval vessel with the improbable name. If you liked NYGASP’s productions of “The Mikado” and “Pirates of Penzance”, you’ll love the humor and beautiful music of Gilbert & Sullivan’s first masterpiece! (Sponsored by Anne P. Baker Endowment for Sustained Excellence in the Arts)

Rick Springfield
Friday, April 11, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $50/$45

For all of his accomplishments as an actor, best-selling author and documentary subject, Rick Springfield has always insisted his first love is music. With 25 million albums sold and 17 Top 40 hits, including the 1981 #1 hit “Jessie’s Girl”, (which earned him a Grammy for Best Male Rock Vocal), it is evident music is indeed his great love. (Sponsored by Baptist Health Madisonville)

US Bank Family Specials

A Children’s Nutcracker Presented by Children’s Center for Dance Education
Tuesday, December 10, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $16/$12 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Tchaikovsky’s famous ballet is performed by children for children. Children’s Center for Dance Education and local dancers celebrate this timeless classic. Auditions for local children will be held Sunday, September 29, 2013 at 2 p.m.

Kenya Safari Acrobats
Friday, April 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $18/$14 (Children 12 & under half-price)

The Kenya Safari Acrobats offer a truly unique cultural experience. They perform a non-stop ride of gravity-defying human pyramids, balancing, tumbling, limbo dancing, hurling through hoops and breathtaking contortions, all while clapping to a joyful Benga beat. Combining artistry with humor and playfulness, these gymnasts are a huge crowd pleaser!

Glema Mahr Chamber Music Series

Sonya Baker-Soprano
Thursday, October 3, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Sonya Gabrielle Baker, noted for her performances of American classical vocal music, has been heard in concert both nationally and internationally, from appearances in Carnegie Hall to the Kremlin.

Sarah E. Geller-Violin
Saturday, November 23, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Described as “a consummate artist performing with convincing vigor and passion,” violinist Sarah E. Geller has performed to critical acclaim coast to coast.

Sara Sant’Ambrogio-Cello
Thursday, February 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Grammy Award-winning cellist Sara Sant’Ambrogio has performed throughout the world at major music centers and festivals and is a founding member of the Eroica Trio.

Pavel Kolesnikov-Piano, 2012 Honens Prize Laureate
Thursday, April 3, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

The Telegraph (London) describes 2012 Honens Prize Laureate pianist Pavel Kolesnikov’s playing as having “brilliance, but also a caressing, almost sly intimacy.”

Hancock Bank & Trust Coffeehouse Series

Robin & Linda Williams-Americana
Tuesday, October 15, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

For more than three decades now, These “Prairie Home Companion” regulars have made it their mission to perform the music that they love, “a robust blend of bluegrass, folk, old-time and acoustic country that combines wryly observant lyrics with a wide-ranging melodicism.”

Jane L. Powell-Goddess of Soul
Friday, November 8, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

“A certain talent comes along every 20 years or so, and Jane is it.” Tony Bennett
Ms. Powell quickly captivates any audience with her musical flexibility, open and playful personality, and spicy, spontaneous sense of humor.

Tiempo Libre-Latin Jazz
Saturday, February 1, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

This three-time Grammy-nominated Cuban music group is one of the hottest young bands today. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council.

Ben Sollee-Genre-bending Cello & Vocals
Saturday, March 22, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Known for his thrilling cello playing that incorporates new techniques to create a unique mix of folk, bluegrass, jazz and R&B, Ben Sollee possesses rough, smooth, smoky vocal stylings and a knack for intricate arrangements.

First United Bank and Trust Proud Partnerships

Hairspray! presented by Hopkins County Central High School Fine Arts Department
Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Book by Mark O’Donnell & Thomas Meehan, Music & Lyrics by Marc Shaiman, Lyrics by Scott Wittman
Can a larger-than-life adolescent manage to vanquish the local TV dance program’s reigning princess, integrate the television show, and find true love (singing and dancing all the while, of course!) without mussing her hair? Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Willy Wonka presented by Madisonville North Hopkins High School Music Department
Friday, March 14, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, March 15, 2014 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Music and Lyrics by Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley, Adapted for the Stage by Timothy Allen McDonald & Leslie Bricusse
Roald Dahl’s timeless story of the world-famous candy man and his quest to find an heir comes to life in this stage adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which features the songs from the classic family film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Community Theatre
(Permanent support for Community Theatre provided by J.B. & Kiel Moore Community Programs Endowment)

I’m Not Rappaport by Herb Gardner-Dinner Theatre
February 20-22, 2014 ∙ 6:30 p.m.
Tickets: (includes dinner) $22

This Tony award-winning play takes a humorous, yet poignant look at dreams and the realities of aging through the eyes of two octogenarians. Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. (Sponsored by Dick & Phyllis Frymire and Ralph & Sue Mitchell)

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
July 18 & 19, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ July 20, 2014 ∙ 2 p.m.
Tickets: $16 (general admission)

Music & lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Book by Hugh Wheeler
A rare instance of a musical thriller, the Glema proudly presents Stephen Sondheim’s chilling, suspenseful, heart-pounding masterpiece of murderous “barberism” and culinary crime. The sophisticated and breath-taking music mixes with visceral drama and deliciously funny moments of dark humor. You’ll find yourself laughing hysterically before gasping in surprise. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International. Recommended for ages 14 and up due to violence and mature themes. (Sponsored by Don & Mary Susan Fishman)

Special Events

Back 2 School Bash
Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 4–10 p.m.
Free Admission (Bring your lawn chairs)

Join us for this annual celebration of local talent featuring Guitar Center’s 2012 Battle of the Blues winner, Boscoe France, as this year’s Headliner.
(Sponsored by the Miner Family Arts Endowment)

A Community Christmas-MCC Singers & Local Ensembles
Friday, December 6, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Join us for this annual tradition as local choral groups team up with community-based instrumental ensembles to ring in the Season.
(Sponsored by United Southern Bank Additional support provided by Mrs. Betty Trover, Allen & Pam Rudd, Barry & Gail Eveland, Dr. & Mrs. J.L. Hamman, & Dr. Judith L. Rhoads)

Kristen Iverson-Author of Full Body Burden
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Kristen Iversen is the author of Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats, a finalist for the Barnes & Noble Discover Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence. Ms. Iverson holds a Ph.D from the University of Denver and is an associate professor at the University of Memphis, where she directs the MFA program in creative writing. Full Body Burden has been chosen as MCC’s “Common Reader” for the 2013-14 academic year.

The Anne P. Baker Gallery

August 17-October 4, 2013
Glema Center Juried Art Exhibit & Glema Center Juried Photography Exhibit
Reception & Awards, Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 2 p.m.

Permanent support for gallery exhibits provided by the Robbie P. Ruby Memorial Endowment.

Information about exhibits throughout the year, as well as any of the events mentioned above, are available at www.glemacenter.org

Sugg Street Post
Information/lineup provided by the Glema Mahr Center for the Arts via Brad Downall

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  • Published in Music

MAD Flavor Fest - Through the Eyes of the Artists

MADISONVILLE, KY (5/28/13)—Madisonville’s first premier music, arts, and film festival, the Mad Flavor Fest, is coming up on Saturday, June 15th, 2013 at the Ballard Convention Center—and it’s no surprise that the inaugural event is garnering attention from communities across the tri-state region and beyond. With an ever-growing lineup of entertainment that currently includes performances by 13 local and out-of-state bands, over 15 art-based vendor booths, 11 US and internationally-produced independent films, a variety of family-friendly activities, food, refreshments such as beer and wine, and more, the festival is poised to be one of the tri-state area’s most entertaining summer events.

But what originally prompted a festival of this scale?

In the late spring of 2012, a powerful concept materialized before former Madisonville resident and The Late Circuit DJ, Mat Pentecost: to organize Madisonville’s first large-scale, collaboration-based arts and music festival that would showcase the wide swath of talent our region holds, while also supporting a positive cause (which, in this case, would become the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross).

As Pentecost explains, the idea came to him after revisiting music he had created with friends in Hopkins County. From there, he pondered upon the relatively unrecognized talent he was surrounded by throughout his youth, and he came to a realization that this underlying, albeit powerful, sense of synergy deserved a place in the public spotlight.

Soon after, Pentecost created a Facebook page that would help to gauge interest in such an event while also serving as a platform for regional collaboration among artists, musicians, filmmakers, and volunteers. The response was immediate and notable, leading Pentecost to take the first steps onto what would become a year-long path of planning, mediation, and overall event organization.

Today, just over a year later, Pentecost’s original vision is mere weeks away from becoming a tangible reality thanks to the support of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, a variety of volunteers and supporters, local artists, musicians, filmmakers, and many more helping hands.

And while the recently launched Mad Flavor Fest website—www.madflavorfest.com—contains information on performers, artists, ticket prices, vendor participation, films, and much more, the Sugg Street Post has reached out to many of the people involved with the festival over the past few weeks to get their take on why the upcoming event is so important to our community, as well as why they got involved. Their respective responses are as follows. 

The Organizers
QUESTIONS:
1.) Why did you decide to get involved with the festival as a volunteer?
2.) Why is a festival like this so important to our region?

Mat Pentecost
I incidentally started this thing because I was listening to a lot of old cassette tape recordings of StereoPop. I just wanted to goof off and hang out with my friends again. I was certain that I wasn't alone in that feeling. I feel that the festival is important because I don't want greater Hopkins County to lose the talent and forward-thinking visionaries that I know this region produces due to boredom and lack of positive stimuli. This happened with most of my generation. Most of us moved away. Why? What happened? Or more importantly, what didn't happen?

Seth Owen 
I decided to volunteer so I could help play a part in promoting the local art scene and businesses in the community where I grew up. Having multiple public outlets available throughout the year where artists can perform and display their talents are important, as is providing local businesses more opportunities to succeed. Growing up playing drums in a few different indie bands in Hopkins County and performing at different events was something I am grateful for having done—especially after living in a few different large metropolitan areas, I see how big of a role the arts have in our daily lives.

Whitney Drewe Wardrip 
I got involved because it is an honor that the festival benefits the Red Cross. We are thrilled to be a part of such an awesome event that is so desperately needed in our community!







Christopher Mcdonald

From as far back as I can remember, I've had a love for, and have felt a deep connection with, music and the arts. Living in this town, I've had the honor to grow up with and form friendships with some intensely talented artists and musicians. Unfortunately, as has been discussed, there are few venues and platforms in the area for these amazing minds to display their gifts. So when Mat shot this idea out, I jumped at the opportunity to help in anyway he needed me. The fact that this thing evolved into a charity event to benefit the Red Cross was the icing on the cake. I knew how huge this could be for the community both artistically and economically. I knew I didn't have nearly as much to offer as the majority of the group, and was humbled to be asked to be a part of what I see becoming the single greatest gathering of local talent seen here to date. This thing is like a dream come true.

Jessica Dockrey 
I got involved with the festival because I love collaboration on a massive scale. It's truly amazing to see what I would consider a piece of collage art, the festival, come to life. People need to appreciate the people that surround them. Being able to share your talents with your community is important to each individual as well as the area as a whole. Love where you live. It's easy if you involve yourself in what's going on around you and make yourself aware of all the reasons to appreciate all that deserves to be appreciated. Acknowledge the people that actively contribute in your life experience.


The Musicians

QUESTIONS:
1.) Where do you call home and who all is a part of your band?
2.) Why did you decide to get involved with this festival?
3.) Why is music and art important to both smaller communities and society at large?

Philosopher’s Stone
(http://pstonemusic.com/)
 
We create music in the hills of Boone County, KY. The four of us live in northern Kentucky just across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. The music makers in Philosopher’s Stone are Chris Laile (bass), John Carrico (drums), Jon '8k' Divita (keys/synthesis) and me, Brad Denham (guitar/vox).

We were invited to perform at the inaugural MAD Flavor Fest via Mat Pentencost, who we have played music with in Cincinnati. Matty P has performed at many of our shows over the years and usually ends up on stage with us for live jams.

Music is an integral part of society…it is essential to completeness. Music and song are basic human functions, like the beating heart or breathing. Like birds and crickets, we all have a song. A quick search of the internet yields an interesting fact: "there is no international law that requires a country to adopt an anthem, yet currently every country has realized that this is something that is needed as part of a national identity. An anthem is used to musically express what a country—or any other group of people—stand for and what unites them.” (www.nationalanthems.info) Music allows us to express our fears, our pain, our wants and desires; it enlightens, elates, and transcends. Above all else, it can express our deepest love. A song can speak for the things that are not easily said. Like a needle in the groove, music imprints itself on the human heart and brain capturing the experience and moment in time, and, upon listening again, those memories and feelings are triggered and can be relived again and again. There is nothing like a great song that can magically take you back to relive your childhood.

If I had to choose between losing my sight or losing my hearing, I would choose sight. The first thing you do when you hear something beautiful or when you experience pleasure is shut your eyes.

Pat Ballard
(http://www.reverbnation.com/patballard)

My home is Hopkins County. The guys I’ll be playing with at the festival are Jon Gilbert (guitar), Gary Madison (bass), Clint Combs (drums), and maybe Johnny Keyz (keyboard).

When I found out about Mat and what he was putting together, and his passion and drive to showcase the talent here and regionally, I just wanted to help in any way I could. Mat has worked really hard to bring so many people together for a great cause, which is not only a benefit for the Red Cross, but also a benefit to all of us by getting so many musicians from this area at one festival.

It’s hard to articulate an answer to the last one. The benefits of the arts to all communities are just so intangible. It really gives us artsy types a little more room to breathe.

Falter
(https://www.facebook.com/FalterMusic)

Home for Falter is right here in Hopkins County. With the exception of our drummer Bryan Thomas who resides in Hopkinsville, KY, all other members (Kevin Offutt, John Pierce, Brad Wilson, Adam O’Rear) were raised right here in Hopkins County.

We in Falter are big believers in giving back to our community, charities, and to society in general. Each year we set aside time and promotions for events such as the Mad Flavor Fest. We have done quite a few this year. Most recently, we played the Thumbs Up For What’s Wright Benefit in Nashville at the Tin Roof. We have had very much support from our fans, especially the fans right here in Hopkins County, so we were thrilled at the chance of being a part of this event for our hometown community and for the American Red Cross. It’s been some time now since we’ve been able to play a show right here at home due to scheduling issues, so being a part of this event is very exciting because allows a way to raise money for the American Red Cross while also bringing awareness to this community, which is a plentiful melting pot of talent. Whether it be musicianship or the arts, Hopkins County is rich with both.

There are so many points that I could address on the matter of music and art’s importance and role in raising of a cultured and great society. Music was a huge part of my life personally, and at no matter what point of my life, I have always acknowledged there has been an overwhelming yearning and calling in my life for music. I am following the calling now on a larger scale, but even if I wasn’t, music will always be a large part of me. To us, the biggest importance to a community and society is self expression and our rights and freedom. So many times I have heard stories of schools cutting the arts programs, and this saddens me because these programs give kids the avenue to find their true passions as artists.

JT Oglesby
(www.facebook.com/jtoglesby)

I am a gypsy-spirited vagabond that embarked on a spiritual journey exploring the musical and creative aspects of the world during my teens, which continues to this day. My band consists of rounders, misfits, and other miscreants I have encountered over the years that embrace a noncompliant societal and creative view. These roustabouts frequently change, making my band an ever-shifting work-in-progress. Each unique version explores a different path unknown to the incarnations before it.

I wanted to get involved with this festival because I am proud to be a Kentuckian and I am proud to be from this area. My family has lived and died in this area for so long that there is more of my DNA in this soil than dirt. I want to do whatever I can to help promote and preserve our heritage and culture. A lot of people say it, but few truly mean it: LLKM! Long Live Kentucky Music!

Hollywood Gutterats
(www.facebook.com/HollywoodGutterats)

Home is where the rock is! The Hollywood Gutterats are Slush (lead vox and guitar), Yngwie Springsteen (guitar), Micheal Anthony Hall (bass), and Tommy Lee Greenwood (drums).

Why did we get involved? Because Slush and Mat Pentacost both like Taco Bell Chalupas!

Music and art is important because it touches everyone in one way or another. And who doesn’t like to be touched?

Technology Versus Horse
(www.reverbnation.com/technologyvshorse)

Technology Versus Horse as a band is from Bowling Green, KY. We all met while/shortly after attending WKU. We are composed of Mike Farmer (vocals), myself (Rafe Heltsley–guitar), Matt Bitner (bass), David Prater (keys), and Josh Hines (drums).

I grew up in White Plains, KY and went to high school in Madisonville (Hopkins County Central High School). When Mat Pentecost was thinking about throwing the festival, he mentioned it to me. I thought it sounded like a great idea and wanted my band to play to show our support.

Music and art are very important outlets of expression. They also help gather people together, bonding over a shared favorite band or artist or meeting up at local shows.

The Fair-Weather Kings
(www.facebook.com/thefairweatherkings)

The Fair-Weather Kings started in Bowling Green KY and all of us still live here. Our members our Wesley Stone, Zach Barton, Jason Williams, Craig Brown, and Marcus Long

Zach and I (Wesley) grew up in Madisonville. Marcus is also from Hopkins County. So we have "roots" there, so to speak. Zach and Marcus' parents still live in Hopkins County. So, for us, getting involved with the festival was about the opportunity to be involved in an event that not only benefits the American Red Cross, but also brings art, in various forms, to a town that a few of us have called home.

Art and music are important because they are "tools" that have many uses; free to anyone that desires them.

The Artists and Vendors
QUESTIONS:
1.) What's your personal info (name, age, hometown, business name and overview, etc.)?
2.) Why is your art form or craft important to you personally?
3.) Why did you decide to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest? OR Why is the festival important to our community?

MCC Humanities Division
(www.madisonville.kctcs.edu/)

Myself (Brooke Archila) and perhaps a few others will be setting up a booth to represent the Humanities Division at Madisonville Community College. The Humanities Division is an eclectic group of instructors who teach classes in the fields of English, history, communications, foreign languages, music, reading, art, and women's studies. We support and promote anything related to these areas on campus and in the community. The study of humanities in various forms is essential to understanding ourselves and the world around us. Through these areas of study, we express our creativity and share in the creativity of others. In our representation of our department at the festival, we want to share the many cool things we have going on in the fall and encourage involvement and support!

Bad Apple Paintwerks
(www.facebook.com/BadApplePaintwerks)
My name is Patrick Harvey and I'm the owner of Bad Apple Paintwerks. I'm 38 and my hometown is Hopkins County. I create art directed towards the musically inclined.

Why is what I do important to me personally? A favorite quote of mine might sum that up: "Paint chips make me thirsty."

I decided to get involved with this festival because I live here and I want to help promote the arts in our community when I have the chance. 

HoldFast WoodCO.
(www.facebook.com/HoldfastWoodCo)
 
My name is Cody McDowell. I’m 24 years old and live in Madisonville, KY. I’m the owner of HoldFast WoodCO. I create simple custom furniture and home decor.

Woodworking is important to me because it’s becoming a lost art, yet it’s one of the basic trades that defines us as a country and as a civilization in general. I think that using reclaimed materials and old tools to do my work is also an important part of what I do because anyone can go to Lowe’s and buy a new 2x4, but if you go to a barn and pull off a 2x4, it has character, it’s had purpose, and it’s been reliable for years and years. Taking something like that and making it into a coffee table for someone means they have a piece of history that will outlive them; it’s something that they can pass to their kids. The Mad Flavor Fest is important to the Hopkins County region, as well as all the local artists and crafts people, because maybe for that one day that we are set up, someone will buy a CD from a band that actually needs the money, and instead of getting something out of a box at Wal-Mart, they will buy something handmade and invest just a little money back into their local economy.

Elite Tattoo Lounge
(www.facebook.com/EliteTattooLounge)

My name is Aaron “Chappy” Chapman. I’m originally from Denver, CO and I own and operate Elite Tattoo Lounge (530 E. Center St., Madisonville KY 42431). We are a full service tattoo and body mod studio, specializing in all styles of tattooing from black and grey, to new school, to photorealism.

The art of tattooing is important to me for many reasons. First, it’s how I make my living, and I make a very good living doing it. It’s really about doing something that you love, but when you can make a living doing it, it is priceless. This is not my job, it is my career and my work. It is what people will know of me when I die.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest because I believe in Madisonville. For so long there has been a lack of focus in this area toward the arts and culture, and people here have lacked a focal point to channel their artistic talents. This town is so full of talented people it is going to burst. That is what the Mad Flavor Fest is to me: the Madisonville arts community no longer being content to stay at home, no longer being contained!

Travis Shanks
(www.facebook.com/tshanks7720?fref=ts)
 
I’m Travis Shanks, 21, and my hometown is Slaughters, KY

Painting and drawing is important to me because it's a great way to express myself. At one point in my life, it helped me escape some hard times. Art gives a way for us to bring beauty into a world where beauty is rapidly thinning.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so I could share my art with more people. And, hopefully, to become known in some way as a reputable artist in the community. The Mad Flavor Fest is most definitely important to our community and what we, as artists, are trying to achieve. Hopefully, this festival will open the eyes of the community to the true value of art, which is so often forgotten in modern times. Also, it's going to be a great place to meet all the people in the local area that share your passions. I cannot wait!

Poppy & Clover (Gina Boyd & Riley Jo Dever)
(www.facebook.com/poppyandclover?fref=ts)

We are a mother/daughter team that loves to craft. We specialize in antiques, soy candles, soaps, pillows, and many other delightful offerings. We are hoping to actually open a store by summertime so that we may invite you down for a cup of tea and to browse around—or just to stop in and say hello.

We have always enjoyed art and crafting around with each other. We decided a couple of years ago to team up and begin to create things that appeal to us and hopefully to others. I love to decorate and it is fulfilling to adorn my home with things that I have created.

We decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so that we could offer some of our goods for the public to come by and see. As we work on opening our store, we are selling things out of our home. We have been asked my many people to see our things in-person, so here is an opportunity to do that. We hope many people come out and enjoy a day of music and art that is offered by local community members.

Big Biting Pig Productions
(www.bigbitingpigproductions.com/)

Steve Hudgins: I’m originally from Chicago, IL, but I currently live in Dawson Springs, KY.

Big Biting Pig Productions specializes in feature-length thrillers and horror films. I love telling stories, acting, directing others to get the most out of themselves and watching everything come together, so being a filmmaker is kind of a natural thing for my tastes.

I think it's great to have a festival that focuses on Madisonville and helps those in the community see what is out there that they may not be aware of.

PJ Woodside: I'm PJ Woodside, living in Madisonville, originally from Charleston, SC, married to Jude Roy of Louisiana Cajun heritage. I mostly collaborate with Steve Hudgins of Big Biting Pig Productions on movie projects, such as my latest movie which will be premiering this summer, Lucid. We also make book trailers, commercials, and music videos through PJ's Productions.

I've come to appreciate horror movies much more since we started making them several years ago. They help people release their everyday fears in a nonthreatening way. The one we're showing at the festival, Spirit Stalkers, is a combination of ghost hunter’s show and a classic haunted house movie. It will have you on the edge of your seat and jumping many times, but the characters are also interesting and believable. It's important to me to tell stories that matter to people and have some emotional resonance.

I got involved, well, because you asked me! But also, there are a lot of Madisonville locations and people in our movies, so we like to share them with the local community when possible! It's always good to see what is being made right here, right under our noses!

The Learn’d Housewife
(www.facebook.com/thelearndhousewife)

I’m Cassie Pendergraff from the wonderful metropolis of Madvegas. I’m a 2002 MNHHS graduate and owner of The Learn’d Housewife. I enjoy crafting and trying new things. I’ve always loved fabric; I come from a long generation of quilters, so finding new ways to work with fabric is always an adventure. I decided to start making fabric button earrings. For me, it’s a fun way to keep memories. I can take scraps from pretty much anything—a baby quilt, a dress I’ve worn, my daughter’s coming home outfits—and make a pair of earrings or a necklace.

I decided to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest because I love supporting local artisans. It’s a great opportunity to see what’s out there in the community and get connected with other people who have similar interests. There are so many unique and creative people hiding in our hometown and it is events like the Mad Flavor Fest that gives them a chance to crawl out of the woodwork.

* * * * * * *

For more on the Mad Flavor Fest, including directions to the Ballard Convention Center (605 E. Arch St., Madisonville), ticket sales, admission information, vendor sign-up sheets, a full list of current performers, artists, vendors, filmmakers, and much more, visit the recently launched Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival website at the following address: www.MadFlavorFest.com.

You can also find the Mad Flavor Festival’s official Facebook page by clicking here.

To read another Sugg Street Post article about the Mad Flavor Fest, which was written by Jessica Dockrey, click here. To learn more about the CINEMADIC Film Festival, click here.

All ticket sales and additional proceeds raised via the Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival will go to support the efforts of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red CrossTo learn more about the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, click here.

The Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival is sponsored by the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, the Sugg Street Post, and Art Interactions

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos courtesy of Jessi Smith, Jeff Harp, and Respective Mad Flavor Festival Participants

 

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  • Published in Art

MAD Flavor Fest - Through the Eyes of the Artists

MADISONVILLE, KY (5/28/13)—Madisonville’s first premier music, arts, and film festival, the Mad Flavor Fest, is coming up on Saturday, June 15th, 2013 at the Ballard Convention Center—and it’s no surprise that the inaugural event is garnering attention from communities across the tri-state region and beyond. With an ever-growing lineup of entertainment that currently includes performances by 13 local and out-of-state bands, over 15 art-based vendor booths, 11 US and internationally-produced independent films, a variety of family-friendly activities, food, refreshments such as beer and wine, and more, the festival is poised to be one of the tri-state area’s most entertaining summer events.

But what originally prompted a festival of this scale?

In the late spring of 2012, a powerful concept materialized before former Madisonville resident and The Late Circuit DJ, Mat Pentecost: to organize Madisonville’s first large-scale, collaboration-based arts and music festival that would showcase the wide swath of talent our region holds, while also supporting a positive cause (which, in this case, would become the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross).

As Pentecost explains, the idea came to him after revisiting music he had created with friends in Hopkins County. From there, he pondered upon the relatively unrecognized talent he was surrounded by throughout his youth, and he came to a realization that this underlying, albeit powerful, sense of synergy deserved a place in the public spotlight.

Soon after, Pentecost created a Facebook page that would help to gauge interest in such an event while also serving as a platform for regional collaboration among artists, musicians, filmmakers, and volunteers. The response was immediate and notable, leading Pentecost to take the first steps onto what would become a year-long path of planning, mediation, and overall event organization.

Today, just over a year later, Pentecost’s original vision is mere weeks away from becoming a tangible reality thanks to the support of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, a variety of volunteers and supporters, local artists, musicians, filmmakers, and many more helping hands.

And while the recently launched Mad Flavor Fest website—www.madflavorfest.com—contains information on performers, artists, ticket prices, vendor participation, films, and much more, the Sugg Street Post has reached out to many of the people involved with the festival over the past few weeks to get their take on why the upcoming event is so important to our community, as well as why they got involved. Their respective responses are as follows. 

The Organizers
QUESTIONS:
1.) Why did you decide to get involved with the festival as a volunteer?
2.) Why is a festival like this so important to our region?

Mat Pentecost
I incidentally started this thing because I was listening to a lot of old cassette tape recordings of StereoPop. I just wanted to goof off and hang out with my friends again. I was certain that I wasn't alone in that feeling. I feel that the festival is important because I don't want greater Hopkins County to lose the talent and forward-thinking visionaries that I know this region produces due to boredom and lack of positive stimuli. This happened with most of my generation. Most of us moved away. Why? What happened? Or more importantly, what didn't happen?

Seth Owen 
I decided to volunteer so I could help play a part in promoting the local art scene and businesses in the community where I grew up. Having multiple public outlets available throughout the year where artists can perform and display their talents are important, as is providing local businesses more opportunities to succeed. Growing up playing drums in a few different indie bands in Hopkins County and performing at different events was something I am grateful for having done—especially after living in a few different large metropolitan areas, I see how big of a role the arts have in our daily lives.

Whitney Drewe Wardrip 
I got involved because it is an honor that the festival benefits the Red Cross. We are thrilled to be a part of such an awesome event that is so desperately needed in our community!







Christopher Mcdonald

From as far back as I can remember, I've had a love for, and have felt a deep connection with, music and the arts. Living in this town, I've had the honor to grow up with and form friendships with some intensely talented artists and musicians. Unfortunately, as has been discussed, there are few venues and platforms in the area for these amazing minds to display their gifts. So when Mat shot this idea out, I jumped at the opportunity to help in anyway he needed me. The fact that this thing evolved into a charity event to benefit the Red Cross was the icing on the cake. I knew how huge this could be for the community both artistically and economically. I knew I didn't have nearly as much to offer as the majority of the group, and was humbled to be asked to be a part of what I see becoming the single greatest gathering of local talent seen here to date. This thing is like a dream come true.

Jessica Dockrey 
I got involved with the festival because I love collaboration on a massive scale. It's truly amazing to see what I would consider a piece of collage art, the festival, come to life. People need to appreciate the people that surround them. Being able to share your talents with your community is important to each individual as well as the area as a whole. Love where you live. It's easy if you involve yourself in what's going on around you and make yourself aware of all the reasons to appreciate all that deserves to be appreciated. Acknowledge the people that actively contribute in your life experience.


The Musicians

QUESTIONS:
1.) Where do you call home and who all is a part of your band?
2.) Why did you decide to get involved with this festival?
3.) Why is music and art important to both smaller communities and society at large?

Philosopher’s Stone
(http://pstonemusic.com/)
 
We create music in the hills of Boone County, KY. The four of us live in northern Kentucky just across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. The music makers in Philosopher’s Stone are Chris Laile (bass), John Carrico (drums), Jon '8k' Divita (keys/synthesis) and me, Brad Denham (guitar/vox).

We were invited to perform at the inaugural MAD Flavor Fest via Mat Pentencost, who we have played music with in Cincinnati. Matty P has performed at many of our shows over the years and usually ends up on stage with us for live jams.

Music is an integral part of society…it is essential to completeness. Music and song are basic human functions, like the beating heart or breathing. Like birds and crickets, we all have a song. A quick search of the internet yields an interesting fact: "there is no international law that requires a country to adopt an anthem, yet currently every country has realized that this is something that is needed as part of a national identity. An anthem is used to musically express what a country—or any other group of people—stand for and what unites them.” (www.nationalanthems.info) Music allows us to express our fears, our pain, our wants and desires; it enlightens, elates, and transcends. Above all else, it can express our deepest love. A song can speak for the things that are not easily said. Like a needle in the groove, music imprints itself on the human heart and brain capturing the experience and moment in time, and, upon listening again, those memories and feelings are triggered and can be relived again and again. There is nothing like a great song that can magically take you back to relive your childhood.

If I had to choose between losing my sight or losing my hearing, I would choose sight. The first thing you do when you hear something beautiful or when you experience pleasure is shut your eyes.

Pat Ballard
(http://www.reverbnation.com/patballard)

My home is Hopkins County. The guys I’ll be playing with at the festival are Jon Gilbert (guitar), Gary Madison (bass), Clint Combs (drums), and maybe Johnny Keyz (keyboard).

When I found out about Mat and what he was putting together, and his passion and drive to showcase the talent here and regionally, I just wanted to help in any way I could. Mat has worked really hard to bring so many people together for a great cause, which is not only a benefit for the Red Cross, but also a benefit to all of us by getting so many musicians from this area at one festival.

It’s hard to articulate an answer to the last one. The benefits of the arts to all communities are just so intangible. It really gives us artsy types a little more room to breathe.

Falter
(https://www.facebook.com/FalterMusic)

Home for Falter is right here in Hopkins County. With the exception of our drummer Bryan Thomas who resides in Hopkinsville, KY, all other members (Kevin Offutt, John Pierce, Brad Wilson, Adam O’Rear) were raised right here in Hopkins County.

We in Falter are big believers in giving back to our community, charities, and to society in general. Each year we set aside time and promotions for events such as the Mad Flavor Fest. We have done quite a few this year. Most recently, we played the Thumbs Up For What’s Wright Benefit in Nashville at the Tin Roof. We have had very much support from our fans, especially the fans right here in Hopkins County, so we were thrilled at the chance of being a part of this event for our hometown community and for the American Red Cross. It’s been some time now since we’ve been able to play a show right here at home due to scheduling issues, so being a part of this event is very exciting because allows a way to raise money for the American Red Cross while also bringing awareness to this community, which is a plentiful melting pot of talent. Whether it be musicianship or the arts, Hopkins County is rich with both.

There are so many points that I could address on the matter of music and art’s importance and role in raising of a cultured and great society. Music was a huge part of my life personally, and at no matter what point of my life, I have always acknowledged there has been an overwhelming yearning and calling in my life for music. I am following the calling now on a larger scale, but even if I wasn’t, music will always be a large part of me. To us, the biggest importance to a community and society is self expression and our rights and freedom. So many times I have heard stories of schools cutting the arts programs, and this saddens me because these programs give kids the avenue to find their true passions as artists.

JT Oglesby
(www.facebook.com/jtoglesby)

I am a gypsy-spirited vagabond that embarked on a spiritual journey exploring the musical and creative aspects of the world during my teens, which continues to this day. My band consists of rounders, misfits, and other miscreants I have encountered over the years that embrace a noncompliant societal and creative view. These roustabouts frequently change, making my band an ever-shifting work-in-progress. Each unique version explores a different path unknown to the incarnations before it.

I wanted to get involved with this festival because I am proud to be a Kentuckian and I am proud to be from this area. My family has lived and died in this area for so long that there is more of my DNA in this soil than dirt. I want to do whatever I can to help promote and preserve our heritage and culture. A lot of people say it, but few truly mean it: LLKM! Long Live Kentucky Music!

Hollywood Gutterats
(www.facebook.com/HollywoodGutterats)

Home is where the rock is! The Hollywood Gutterats are Slush (lead vox and guitar), Yngwie Springsteen (guitar), Micheal Anthony Hall (bass), and Tommy Lee Greenwood (drums).

Why did we get involved? Because Slush and Mat Pentacost both like Taco Bell Chalupas!

Music and art is important because it touches everyone in one way or another. And who doesn’t like to be touched?

Technology Versus Horse
(www.reverbnation.com/technologyvshorse)

Technology Versus Horse as a band is from Bowling Green, KY. We all met while/shortly after attending WKU. We are composed of Mike Farmer (vocals), myself (Rafe Heltsley–guitar), Matt Bitner (bass), David Prater (keys), and Josh Hines (drums).

I grew up in White Plains, KY and went to high school in Madisonville (Hopkins County Central High School). When Mat Pentecost was thinking about throwing the festival, he mentioned it to me. I thought it sounded like a great idea and wanted my band to play to show our support.

Music and art are very important outlets of expression. They also help gather people together, bonding over a shared favorite band or artist or meeting up at local shows.

The Fair-Weather Kings
(www.facebook.com/thefairweatherkings)

The Fair-Weather Kings started in Bowling Green KY and all of us still live here. Our members our Wesley Stone, Zach Barton, Jason Williams, Craig Brown, and Marcus Long

Zach and I (Wesley) grew up in Madisonville. Marcus is also from Hopkins County. So we have "roots" there, so to speak. Zach and Marcus' parents still live in Hopkins County. So, for us, getting involved with the festival was about the opportunity to be involved in an event that not only benefits the American Red Cross, but also brings art, in various forms, to a town that a few of us have called home.

Art and music are important because they are "tools" that have many uses; free to anyone that desires them.

The Artists and Vendors
QUESTIONS:
1.) What's your personal info (name, age, hometown, business name and overview, etc.)?
2.) Why is your art form or craft important to you personally?
3.) Why did you decide to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest? OR Why is the festival important to our community?

MCC Humanities Division
(www.madisonville.kctcs.edu/)

Myself (Brooke Archila) and perhaps a few others will be setting up a booth to represent the Humanities Division at Madisonville Community College. The Humanities Division is an eclectic group of instructors who teach classes in the fields of English, history, communications, foreign languages, music, reading, art, and women's studies. We support and promote anything related to these areas on campus and in the community. The study of humanities in various forms is essential to understanding ourselves and the world around us. Through these areas of study, we express our creativity and share in the creativity of others. In our representation of our department at the festival, we want to share the many cool things we have going on in the fall and encourage involvement and support!

Bad Apple Paintwerks
(www.facebook.com/BadApplePaintwerks)
My name is Patrick Harvey and I'm the owner of Bad Apple Paintwerks. I'm 38 and my hometown is Hopkins County. I create art directed towards the musically inclined.

Why is what I do important to me personally? A favorite quote of mine might sum that up: "Paint chips make me thirsty."

I decided to get involved with this festival because I live here and I want to help promote the arts in our community when I have the chance. 

HoldFast WoodCO.
(www.facebook.com/HoldfastWoodCo)
 
My name is Cody McDowell. I’m 24 years old and live in Madisonville, KY. I’m the owner of HoldFast WoodCO. I create simple custom furniture and home decor.

Woodworking is important to me because it’s becoming a lost art, yet it’s one of the basic trades that defines us as a country and as a civilization in general. I think that using reclaimed materials and old tools to do my work is also an important part of what I do because anyone can go to Lowe’s and buy a new 2x4, but if you go to a barn and pull off a 2x4, it has character, it’s had purpose, and it’s been reliable for years and years. Taking something like that and making it into a coffee table for someone means they have a piece of history that will outlive them; it’s something that they can pass to their kids. The Mad Flavor Fest is important to the Hopkins County region, as well as all the local artists and crafts people, because maybe for that one day that we are set up, someone will buy a CD from a band that actually needs the money, and instead of getting something out of a box at Wal-Mart, they will buy something handmade and invest just a little money back into their local economy.

Elite Tattoo Lounge
(www.facebook.com/EliteTattooLounge)

My name is Aaron “Chappy” Chapman. I’m originally from Denver, CO and I own and operate Elite Tattoo Lounge (530 E. Center St., Madisonville KY 42431). We are a full service tattoo and body mod studio, specializing in all styles of tattooing from black and grey, to new school, to photorealism.

The art of tattooing is important to me for many reasons. First, it’s how I make my living, and I make a very good living doing it. It’s really about doing something that you love, but when you can make a living doing it, it is priceless. This is not my job, it is my career and my work. It is what people will know of me when I die.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest because I believe in Madisonville. For so long there has been a lack of focus in this area toward the arts and culture, and people here have lacked a focal point to channel their artistic talents. This town is so full of talented people it is going to burst. That is what the Mad Flavor Fest is to me: the Madisonville arts community no longer being content to stay at home, no longer being contained!

Travis Shanks
(www.facebook.com/tshanks7720?fref=ts)
 
I’m Travis Shanks, 21, and my hometown is Slaughters, KY

Painting and drawing is important to me because it's a great way to express myself. At one point in my life, it helped me escape some hard times. Art gives a way for us to bring beauty into a world where beauty is rapidly thinning.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so I could share my art with more people. And, hopefully, to become known in some way as a reputable artist in the community. The Mad Flavor Fest is most definitely important to our community and what we, as artists, are trying to achieve. Hopefully, this festival will open the eyes of the community to the true value of art, which is so often forgotten in modern times. Also, it's going to be a great place to meet all the people in the local area that share your passions. I cannot wait!

Poppy & Clover (Gina Boyd & Riley Jo Dever)
(www.facebook.com/poppyandclover?fref=ts)

We are a mother/daughter team that loves to craft. We specialize in antiques, soy candles, soaps, pillows, and many other delightful offerings. We are hoping to actually open a store by summertime so that we may invite you down for a cup of tea and to browse around—or just to stop in and say hello.

We have always enjoyed art and crafting around with each other. We decided a couple of years ago to team up and begin to create things that appeal to us and hopefully to others. I love to decorate and it is fulfilling to adorn my home with things that I have created.

We decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so that we could offer some of our goods for the public to come by and see. As we work on opening our store, we are selling things out of our home. We have been asked my many people to see our things in-person, so here is an opportunity to do that. We hope many people come out and enjoy a day of music and art that is offered by local community members.

Big Biting Pig Productions
(www.bigbitingpigproductions.com/)

Steve Hudgins: I’m originally from Chicago, IL, but I currently live in Dawson Springs, KY.

Big Biting Pig Productions specializes in feature-length thrillers and horror films. I love telling stories, acting, directing others to get the most out of themselves and watching everything come together, so being a filmmaker is kind of a natural thing for my tastes.

I think it's great to have a festival that focuses on Madisonville and helps those in the community see what is out there that they may not be aware of.

PJ Woodside: I'm PJ Woodside, living in Madisonville, originally from Charleston, SC, married to Jude Roy of Louisiana Cajun heritage. I mostly collaborate with Steve Hudgins of Big Biting Pig Productions on movie projects, such as my latest movie which will be premiering this summer, Lucid. We also make book trailers, commercials, and music videos through PJ's Productions.

I've come to appreciate horror movies much more since we started making them several years ago. They help people release their everyday fears in a nonthreatening way. The one we're showing at the festival, Spirit Stalkers, is a combination of ghost hunter’s show and a classic haunted house movie. It will have you on the edge of your seat and jumping many times, but the characters are also interesting and believable. It's important to me to tell stories that matter to people and have some emotional resonance.

I got involved, well, because you asked me! But also, there are a lot of Madisonville locations and people in our movies, so we like to share them with the local community when possible! It's always good to see what is being made right here, right under our noses!

The Learn’d Housewife
(www.facebook.com/thelearndhousewife)

I’m Cassie Pendergraff from the wonderful metropolis of Madvegas. I’m a 2002 MNHHS graduate and owner of The Learn’d Housewife. I enjoy crafting and trying new things. I’ve always loved fabric; I come from a long generation of quilters, so finding new ways to work with fabric is always an adventure. I decided to start making fabric button earrings. For me, it’s a fun way to keep memories. I can take scraps from pretty much anything—a baby quilt, a dress I’ve worn, my daughter’s coming home outfits—and make a pair of earrings or a necklace.

I decided to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest because I love supporting local artisans. It’s a great opportunity to see what’s out there in the community and get connected with other people who have similar interests. There are so many unique and creative people hiding in our hometown and it is events like the Mad Flavor Fest that gives them a chance to crawl out of the woodwork.

* * * * * * *

For more on the Mad Flavor Fest, including directions to the Ballard Convention Center (605 E. Arch St., Madisonville), ticket sales, admission information, vendor sign-up sheets, a full list of current performers, artists, vendors, filmmakers, and much more, visit the recently launched Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival website at the following address: www.MadFlavorFest.com.

You can also find the Mad Flavor Festival’s official Facebook page by clicking here.

To read another Sugg Street Post article about the Mad Flavor Fest, which was written by Jessica Dockrey, click here. To learn more about the CINEMADIC Film Festival, click here.

All ticket sales and additional proceeds raised via the Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival will go to support the efforts of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red CrossTo learn more about the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, click here.

The Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival is sponsored by the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, the Sugg Street Post, and Art Interactions

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos courtesy of Jessi Smith, Jeff Harp, and Respective Mad Flavor Festival Participants

 

Read more...

MAD Flavor Fest - Through the Eyes of the Artists

MADISONVILLE, KY (5/28/13)—Madisonville’s first premier music, arts, and film festival, the Mad Flavor Fest, is coming up on Saturday, June 15th, 2013 at the Ballard Convention Center—and it’s no surprise that the inaugural event is garnering attention from communities across the tri-state region and beyond. With an ever-growing lineup of entertainment that currently includes performances by 13 local and out-of-state bands, over 15 art-based vendor booths, 11 US and internationally-produced independent films, a variety of family-friendly activities, food, refreshments such as beer and wine, and more, the festival is poised to be one of the tri-state area’s most entertaining summer events.

But what originally prompted a festival of this scale?

In the late spring of 2012, a powerful concept materialized before former Madisonville resident and The Late Circuit DJ, Mat Pentecost: to organize Madisonville’s first large-scale, collaboration-based arts and music festival that would showcase the wide swath of talent our region holds, while also supporting a positive cause (which, in this case, would become the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross).

As Pentecost explains, the idea came to him after revisiting music he had created with friends in Hopkins County. From there, he pondered upon the relatively unrecognized talent he was surrounded by throughout his youth, and he came to a realization that this underlying, albeit powerful, sense of synergy deserved a place in the public spotlight.

Soon after, Pentecost created a Facebook page that would help to gauge interest in such an event while also serving as a platform for regional collaboration among artists, musicians, filmmakers, and volunteers. The response was immediate and notable, leading Pentecost to take the first steps onto what would become a year-long path of planning, mediation, and overall event organization.

Today, just over a year later, Pentecost’s original vision is mere weeks away from becoming a tangible reality thanks to the support of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, a variety of volunteers and supporters, local artists, musicians, filmmakers, and many more helping hands.

And while the recently launched Mad Flavor Fest website—www.madflavorfest.com—contains information on performers, artists, ticket prices, vendor participation, films, and much more, the Sugg Street Post has reached out to many of the people involved with the festival over the past few weeks to get their take on why the upcoming event is so important to our community, as well as why they got involved. Their respective responses are as follows. 

The Organizers
QUESTIONS:
1.) Why did you decide to get involved with the festival as a volunteer?
2.) Why is a festival like this so important to our region?

Mat Pentecost
I incidentally started this thing because I was listening to a lot of old cassette tape recordings of StereoPop. I just wanted to goof off and hang out with my friends again. I was certain that I wasn't alone in that feeling. I feel that the festival is important because I don't want greater Hopkins County to lose the talent and forward-thinking visionaries that I know this region produces due to boredom and lack of positive stimuli. This happened with most of my generation. Most of us moved away. Why? What happened? Or more importantly, what didn't happen?

Seth Owen 
I decided to volunteer so I could help play a part in promoting the local art scene and businesses in the community where I grew up. Having multiple public outlets available throughout the year where artists can perform and display their talents are important, as is providing local businesses more opportunities to succeed. Growing up playing drums in a few different indie bands in Hopkins County and performing at different events was something I am grateful for having done—especially after living in a few different large metropolitan areas, I see how big of a role the arts have in our daily lives.

Whitney Drewe Wardrip 
I got involved because it is an honor that the festival benefits the Red Cross. We are thrilled to be a part of such an awesome event that is so desperately needed in our community!







Christopher Mcdonald

From as far back as I can remember, I've had a love for, and have felt a deep connection with, music and the arts. Living in this town, I've had the honor to grow up with and form friendships with some intensely talented artists and musicians. Unfortunately, as has been discussed, there are few venues and platforms in the area for these amazing minds to display their gifts. So when Mat shot this idea out, I jumped at the opportunity to help in anyway he needed me. The fact that this thing evolved into a charity event to benefit the Red Cross was the icing on the cake. I knew how huge this could be for the community both artistically and economically. I knew I didn't have nearly as much to offer as the majority of the group, and was humbled to be asked to be a part of what I see becoming the single greatest gathering of local talent seen here to date. This thing is like a dream come true.

Jessica Dockrey 
I got involved with the festival because I love collaboration on a massive scale. It's truly amazing to see what I would consider a piece of collage art, the festival, come to life. People need to appreciate the people that surround them. Being able to share your talents with your community is important to each individual as well as the area as a whole. Love where you live. It's easy if you involve yourself in what's going on around you and make yourself aware of all the reasons to appreciate all that deserves to be appreciated. Acknowledge the people that actively contribute in your life experience.


The Musicians

QUESTIONS:
1.) Where do you call home and who all is a part of your band?
2.) Why did you decide to get involved with this festival?
3.) Why is music and art important to both smaller communities and society at large?

Philosopher’s Stone
(http://pstonemusic.com/)
 
We create music in the hills of Boone County, KY. The four of us live in northern Kentucky just across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. The music makers in Philosopher’s Stone are Chris Laile (bass), John Carrico (drums), Jon '8k' Divita (keys/synthesis) and me, Brad Denham (guitar/vox).

We were invited to perform at the inaugural MAD Flavor Fest via Mat Pentencost, who we have played music with in Cincinnati. Matty P has performed at many of our shows over the years and usually ends up on stage with us for live jams.

Music is an integral part of society…it is essential to completeness. Music and song are basic human functions, like the beating heart or breathing. Like birds and crickets, we all have a song. A quick search of the internet yields an interesting fact: "there is no international law that requires a country to adopt an anthem, yet currently every country has realized that this is something that is needed as part of a national identity. An anthem is used to musically express what a country—or any other group of people—stand for and what unites them.” (www.nationalanthems.info) Music allows us to express our fears, our pain, our wants and desires; it enlightens, elates, and transcends. Above all else, it can express our deepest love. A song can speak for the things that are not easily said. Like a needle in the groove, music imprints itself on the human heart and brain capturing the experience and moment in time, and, upon listening again, those memories and feelings are triggered and can be relived again and again. There is nothing like a great song that can magically take you back to relive your childhood.

If I had to choose between losing my sight or losing my hearing, I would choose sight. The first thing you do when you hear something beautiful or when you experience pleasure is shut your eyes.

Pat Ballard
(http://www.reverbnation.com/patballard)

My home is Hopkins County. The guys I’ll be playing with at the festival are Jon Gilbert (guitar), Gary Madison (bass), Clint Combs (drums), and maybe Johnny Keyz (keyboard).

When I found out about Mat and what he was putting together, and his passion and drive to showcase the talent here and regionally, I just wanted to help in any way I could. Mat has worked really hard to bring so many people together for a great cause, which is not only a benefit for the Red Cross, but also a benefit to all of us by getting so many musicians from this area at one festival.

It’s hard to articulate an answer to the last one. The benefits of the arts to all communities are just so intangible. It really gives us artsy types a little more room to breathe.

Falter
(https://www.facebook.com/FalterMusic)

Home for Falter is right here in Hopkins County. With the exception of our drummer Bryan Thomas who resides in Hopkinsville, KY, all other members (Kevin Offutt, John Pierce, Brad Wilson, Adam O’Rear) were raised right here in Hopkins County.

We in Falter are big believers in giving back to our community, charities, and to society in general. Each year we set aside time and promotions for events such as the Mad Flavor Fest. We have done quite a few this year. Most recently, we played the Thumbs Up For What’s Wright Benefit in Nashville at the Tin Roof. We have had very much support from our fans, especially the fans right here in Hopkins County, so we were thrilled at the chance of being a part of this event for our hometown community and for the American Red Cross. It’s been some time now since we’ve been able to play a show right here at home due to scheduling issues, so being a part of this event is very exciting because allows a way to raise money for the American Red Cross while also bringing awareness to this community, which is a plentiful melting pot of talent. Whether it be musicianship or the arts, Hopkins County is rich with both.

There are so many points that I could address on the matter of music and art’s importance and role in raising of a cultured and great society. Music was a huge part of my life personally, and at no matter what point of my life, I have always acknowledged there has been an overwhelming yearning and calling in my life for music. I am following the calling now on a larger scale, but even if I wasn’t, music will always be a large part of me. To us, the biggest importance to a community and society is self expression and our rights and freedom. So many times I have heard stories of schools cutting the arts programs, and this saddens me because these programs give kids the avenue to find their true passions as artists.

JT Oglesby
(www.facebook.com/jtoglesby)

I am a gypsy-spirited vagabond that embarked on a spiritual journey exploring the musical and creative aspects of the world during my teens, which continues to this day. My band consists of rounders, misfits, and other miscreants I have encountered over the years that embrace a noncompliant societal and creative view. These roustabouts frequently change, making my band an ever-shifting work-in-progress. Each unique version explores a different path unknown to the incarnations before it.

I wanted to get involved with this festival because I am proud to be a Kentuckian and I am proud to be from this area. My family has lived and died in this area for so long that there is more of my DNA in this soil than dirt. I want to do whatever I can to help promote and preserve our heritage and culture. A lot of people say it, but few truly mean it: LLKM! Long Live Kentucky Music!

Hollywood Gutterats
(www.facebook.com/HollywoodGutterats)

Home is where the rock is! The Hollywood Gutterats are Slush (lead vox and guitar), Yngwie Springsteen (guitar), Micheal Anthony Hall (bass), and Tommy Lee Greenwood (drums).

Why did we get involved? Because Slush and Mat Pentacost both like Taco Bell Chalupas!

Music and art is important because it touches everyone in one way or another. And who doesn’t like to be touched?

Technology Versus Horse
(www.reverbnation.com/technologyvshorse)

Technology Versus Horse as a band is from Bowling Green, KY. We all met while/shortly after attending WKU. We are composed of Mike Farmer (vocals), myself (Rafe Heltsley–guitar), Matt Bitner (bass), David Prater (keys), and Josh Hines (drums).

I grew up in White Plains, KY and went to high school in Madisonville (Hopkins County Central High School). When Mat Pentecost was thinking about throwing the festival, he mentioned it to me. I thought it sounded like a great idea and wanted my band to play to show our support.

Music and art are very important outlets of expression. They also help gather people together, bonding over a shared favorite band or artist or meeting up at local shows.

The Fair-Weather Kings
(www.facebook.com/thefairweatherkings)

The Fair-Weather Kings started in Bowling Green KY and all of us still live here. Our members our Wesley Stone, Zach Barton, Jason Williams, Craig Brown, and Marcus Long

Zach and I (Wesley) grew up in Madisonville. Marcus is also from Hopkins County. So we have "roots" there, so to speak. Zach and Marcus' parents still live in Hopkins County. So, for us, getting involved with the festival was about the opportunity to be involved in an event that not only benefits the American Red Cross, but also brings art, in various forms, to a town that a few of us have called home.

Art and music are important because they are "tools" that have many uses; free to anyone that desires them.

The Artists and Vendors
QUESTIONS:
1.) What's your personal info (name, age, hometown, business name and overview, etc.)?
2.) Why is your art form or craft important to you personally?
3.) Why did you decide to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest? OR Why is the festival important to our community?

MCC Humanities Division
(www.madisonville.kctcs.edu/)

Myself (Brooke Archila) and perhaps a few others will be setting up a booth to represent the Humanities Division at Madisonville Community College. The Humanities Division is an eclectic group of instructors who teach classes in the fields of English, history, communications, foreign languages, music, reading, art, and women's studies. We support and promote anything related to these areas on campus and in the community. The study of humanities in various forms is essential to understanding ourselves and the world around us. Through these areas of study, we express our creativity and share in the creativity of others. In our representation of our department at the festival, we want to share the many cool things we have going on in the fall and encourage involvement and support!

Bad Apple Paintwerks
(www.facebook.com/BadApplePaintwerks)
My name is Patrick Harvey and I'm the owner of Bad Apple Paintwerks. I'm 38 and my hometown is Hopkins County. I create art directed towards the musically inclined.

Why is what I do important to me personally? A favorite quote of mine might sum that up: "Paint chips make me thirsty."

I decided to get involved with this festival because I live here and I want to help promote the arts in our community when I have the chance. 

HoldFast WoodCO.
(www.facebook.com/HoldfastWoodCo)
 
My name is Cody McDowell. I’m 24 years old and live in Madisonville, KY. I’m the owner of HoldFast WoodCO. I create simple custom furniture and home decor.

Woodworking is important to me because it’s becoming a lost art, yet it’s one of the basic trades that defines us as a country and as a civilization in general. I think that using reclaimed materials and old tools to do my work is also an important part of what I do because anyone can go to Lowe’s and buy a new 2x4, but if you go to a barn and pull off a 2x4, it has character, it’s had purpose, and it’s been reliable for years and years. Taking something like that and making it into a coffee table for someone means they have a piece of history that will outlive them; it’s something that they can pass to their kids. The Mad Flavor Fest is important to the Hopkins County region, as well as all the local artists and crafts people, because maybe for that one day that we are set up, someone will buy a CD from a band that actually needs the money, and instead of getting something out of a box at Wal-Mart, they will buy something handmade and invest just a little money back into their local economy.

Elite Tattoo Lounge
(www.facebook.com/EliteTattooLounge)

My name is Aaron “Chappy” Chapman. I’m originally from Denver, CO and I own and operate Elite Tattoo Lounge (530 E. Center St., Madisonville KY 42431). We are a full service tattoo and body mod studio, specializing in all styles of tattooing from black and grey, to new school, to photorealism.

The art of tattooing is important to me for many reasons. First, it’s how I make my living, and I make a very good living doing it. It’s really about doing something that you love, but when you can make a living doing it, it is priceless. This is not my job, it is my career and my work. It is what people will know of me when I die.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest because I believe in Madisonville. For so long there has been a lack of focus in this area toward the arts and culture, and people here have lacked a focal point to channel their artistic talents. This town is so full of talented people it is going to burst. That is what the Mad Flavor Fest is to me: the Madisonville arts community no longer being content to stay at home, no longer being contained!

Travis Shanks
(www.facebook.com/tshanks7720?fref=ts)
 
I’m Travis Shanks, 21, and my hometown is Slaughters, KY

Painting and drawing is important to me because it's a great way to express myself. At one point in my life, it helped me escape some hard times. Art gives a way for us to bring beauty into a world where beauty is rapidly thinning.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so I could share my art with more people. And, hopefully, to become known in some way as a reputable artist in the community. The Mad Flavor Fest is most definitely important to our community and what we, as artists, are trying to achieve. Hopefully, this festival will open the eyes of the community to the true value of art, which is so often forgotten in modern times. Also, it's going to be a great place to meet all the people in the local area that share your passions. I cannot wait!

Poppy & Clover (Gina Boyd & Riley Jo Dever)
(www.facebook.com/poppyandclover?fref=ts)

We are a mother/daughter team that loves to craft. We specialize in antiques, soy candles, soaps, pillows, and many other delightful offerings. We are hoping to actually open a store by summertime so that we may invite you down for a cup of tea and to browse around—or just to stop in and say hello.

We have always enjoyed art and crafting around with each other. We decided a couple of years ago to team up and begin to create things that appeal to us and hopefully to others. I love to decorate and it is fulfilling to adorn my home with things that I have created.

We decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so that we could offer some of our goods for the public to come by and see. As we work on opening our store, we are selling things out of our home. We have been asked my many people to see our things in-person, so here is an opportunity to do that. We hope many people come out and enjoy a day of music and art that is offered by local community members.

Big Biting Pig Productions
(www.bigbitingpigproductions.com/)

Steve Hudgins: I’m originally from Chicago, IL, but I currently live in Dawson Springs, KY.

Big Biting Pig Productions specializes in feature-length thrillers and horror films. I love telling stories, acting, directing others to get the most out of themselves and watching everything come together, so being a filmmaker is kind of a natural thing for my tastes.

I think it's great to have a festival that focuses on Madisonville and helps those in the community see what is out there that they may not be aware of.

PJ Woodside: I'm PJ Woodside, living in Madisonville, originally from Charleston, SC, married to Jude Roy of Louisiana Cajun heritage. I mostly collaborate with Steve Hudgins of Big Biting Pig Productions on movie projects, such as my latest movie which will be premiering this summer, Lucid. We also make book trailers, commercials, and music videos through PJ's Productions.

I've come to appreciate horror movies much more since we started making them several years ago. They help people release their everyday fears in a nonthreatening way. The one we're showing at the festival, Spirit Stalkers, is a combination of ghost hunter’s show and a classic haunted house movie. It will have you on the edge of your seat and jumping many times, but the characters are also interesting and believable. It's important to me to tell stories that matter to people and have some emotional resonance.

I got involved, well, because you asked me! But also, there are a lot of Madisonville locations and people in our movies, so we like to share them with the local community when possible! It's always good to see what is being made right here, right under our noses!

The Learn’d Housewife
(www.facebook.com/thelearndhousewife)

I’m Cassie Pendergraff from the wonderful metropolis of Madvegas. I’m a 2002 MNHHS graduate and owner of The Learn’d Housewife. I enjoy crafting and trying new things. I’ve always loved fabric; I come from a long generation of quilters, so finding new ways to work with fabric is always an adventure. I decided to start making fabric button earrings. For me, it’s a fun way to keep memories. I can take scraps from pretty much anything—a baby quilt, a dress I’ve worn, my daughter’s coming home outfits—and make a pair of earrings or a necklace.

I decided to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest because I love supporting local artisans. It’s a great opportunity to see what’s out there in the community and get connected with other people who have similar interests. There are so many unique and creative people hiding in our hometown and it is events like the Mad Flavor Fest that gives them a chance to crawl out of the woodwork.

* * * * * * *

For more on the Mad Flavor Fest, including directions to the Ballard Convention Center (605 E. Arch St., Madisonville), ticket sales, admission information, vendor sign-up sheets, a full list of current performers, artists, vendors, filmmakers, and much more, visit the recently launched Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival website at the following address: www.MadFlavorFest.com.

You can also find the Mad Flavor Festival’s official Facebook page by clicking here.

To read another Sugg Street Post article about the Mad Flavor Fest, which was written by Jessica Dockrey, click here. To learn more about the CINEMADIC Film Festival, click here.

All ticket sales and additional proceeds raised via the Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival will go to support the efforts of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red CrossTo learn more about the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, click here.

The Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival is sponsored by the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, the Sugg Street Post, and Art Interactions

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos courtesy of Jessi Smith, Jeff Harp, and Respective Mad Flavor Festival Participants

 

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  • Published in Music

Ray Ligon—Touchin’ Folks with Music

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (5/8/13)—Over 40 years of musicianship ain’t too shabby. Add in a compassionate approach to creating and performing inspiring, original songs—as well as some comedy at times—and you’ve got local singer-songwriter and country music mainstay, Ray Ligon.

Distinguished by his powerful vocal talents and articulate acoustic tones on a catalog of both original work and covers, Ray has amassed quite the following in western Kentucky over the years—and he has no intentions of throwing in the towel anytime soon. What’s more, his musical mantra, “It’s all about touchin’ folks with the music,” is alive and well in the music he crafts and the responses he receives from devoted fans.

Want proof? Simply check out any of Ray’s live concert dates, which include a spot at Madisonville’s upcoming Mad Flavor Arts and Music Festival on June 15th.

Yet, what most might not know is that Ray is a military veteran who once sang one of Kentucky’s most well-known tunes—the “Happy Birthday” song—to a Korean teenager and her family while stationed overseas; that he’s a rigorous, longtime supporter of both area civic organizations and charitable events such as the Madisonville Lions Club and WPSD’s annual Telethon of the Stars fundraiser; that he traveled to Atlanta, Georgia earlier this year to audition for NBC’s singing-based series, The Voice; and that he is currently working toward achieving a life-long dream of making a fulltime living from playing his music all over the country, and possibly the world.

Fortunately, myself and area photographer Jeff Harp got the chance to talk with the seasoned performer a couple months ago about the aforementioned facts and much, much more.

Who is Ray Ligon? Where do his passions lie? What does he think about the local music scene? And what does he have in-store for the future? The answers, as well as a few additional photos, can be found below. 

Luke Short: Where are you originally from?

Ray Ligon: I’m originally from Cuba…uh, I mean Miami, Florida. [laughs] I was born in Miami and raised in Hialeah, Florida.

LS: Was this before or after the Cuban Missile Crisis? [laughs]

RL: This was after. I’m not that old! [laughs] I remember it all, though.

LS: When did your relationship with music really begin and how did it develop over time?

RL: My daddy bought me my first guitar when I was 13-years-old. It was an old Sears Silvertone guitar. I wish I still had it, but it got all tore up. I started teaching myself and, at first, I was going from string to string—you know, that silly “Mary had a Little Lamb” stuff. [laughs] Finally, I said to myself, “I need to start using chords,” so that’s what I did. A lot of the other stuff I learned came from other musicians that I knew or liked over the years. Then, from there, I started to develop a style all my own.

LS: Did you ask your dad to get you a guitar or did he just kind of get it for you out of the blue?

RL: I think I was kind of like, “Hey dad, can I get that?” Back then, the Silvertone was like $36 or something like that, you know? So he got it for me and he’s been supportive of my music ever since then.

LS: What’s your dad’s name?

RL: His name is Lowell. I have the same first name actually. Ray is my middle name—Lowell Ray Ligon. My dad was Lowell Dewayne Ligon.

LS: Was there a reason you wanted a guitar? Was there a band that you really liked that made you want to play?

RL: Back then, I was listening to John Denver, James Taylor, and other stuff like that. My dad always had country albums and played country music. I grew up singing in the choirs at church, too. I wanted a guitar because I liked to sing and I wanted to accompany myself.

LS: When was the first time you really ever played in front of people?

RL: I was used to singing in the youth choir, but the first time I ever really played for people was in high school. I was a sophomore and I signed up for the talent show. Before the talent show came up, I was also involved with Campus Life: Youth for Christ. Long story short, I broke this pinky [points to pinky finger on left hand] during one of our events. Well, that’s my chording hand. They drilled two pins through the bone, so I came walking out on the stage for this talent show in high school with a big bandage around my pinky finger. As you can imagine, the whole audience in the auditorium just laughed. I got up there and won first place, though. As a matter of fact, I won first place all three years in high school, so that’s where I started playing in front of people and getting used to it a little bit. Then, right out of high school, I went into the Army. I continued the adventure with music in the Army and continued learning while I was just hanging out.

LS: So you took your guitar with you in the military?

RL: Oh yeah. If I go somewhere, especially if I’m going to be out of town for a little while, the guitar is going with me. It has to.

LS: I’m guessing that you were singing during the talent shows, too?

RL: Yeah, definitely.

LS: So singing is just something that’s always came along with your playing?

RL: For sure. I’ve gotten a lot of compliments over the years. People say they love my guitar playing and what I can do on the instrument, but when I sit back and watch somebody really tear a guitar up, I feel like a rookie—especially the guys that play lead and all that stuff. I don’t do that.

LS: You have more of a singer-songwriter type approach. It’s almost like folk or Americana in a sense.

RL: Yeah, and that’s what I work on. It’s my own style. When I’m playing covers, I try to emulate the original version to do it justice, but I also put a little of my own style on it. As a performer, I couldn’t make it on just my guitar playing. I’d have to be backing someone up or have them backing me up. I also play a 12-string, a couple six-string acoustics, and a six-string electric.

LS: What kind of guitars are they?

RL: My main guitar is a vintage six-string acoustic-electric Alvarez Yairi. I also have a Santa Fe Takamine, another smaller Takamine, a 12-string Ovation, a six-string Sunlight guitar—which is a “learner” but sounds really good—and I have an Epiphone Les Paul electric guitar.

LS: At the end of the day, what do you consider your style of music?

RL: I play country, inspirational country, folk—it’s kind of a James Taylor meets Garth Brooks meets George Strait meets John Denver. It’s my own kind of thing really. People ask me who I sound like and I just have to tell them, “I sound like Ray Ligon.” I mean, I don’t want to sound exactly like someone else. There are too many people out there trying to be just like somebody else right now. I don’t want to do that. I want to be who I am. I want to pursue the dream. Why would I want to sound exactly like another artist? Now, on some songs I might sound similar to another artist. When I play Trace Adkins tunes, I can do it justice; I can sound similar to him. It’s still me, though.

LS: What do you really want to do with music when it comes down to it?

RL: I just turned 55, but I’m still trying to pursue the dream. I’m not necessarily trying to look for a major label or anything like that, but if that happens and it’s all good, I would consider going that route. But I really just want to play music fulltime. I want to run all over the country doing what I love. I’d like to go overseas with the USO to show support for the troops. I would love to give back to the military, because I’m a six-year Army veteran myself.

LS: Where all did you go when you were in the military?

RL: I started out in Fort Knox, KY for my training, went to Fort Lewis in Washington, and from there went to Camp Casey in Korea. Then I came back to Fort Knox, got out for a few months, went back in, and ended up at Fort Bliss in Texas. I’ve been a few different places through the military, including Germany for some exercises. It was cool, too.

LS: I can imagine that you might have picked up some music-related stories along the way, too.

RL: When I was stationed in Korea, President [Jimmy] Carter was in office—it was back in ‘79. I have a vivid memory from back then.

From basic training on, you never forget the sound of your drill sergeant’s cadence, and this particular day, while I’m in Korea, I’m the staff-duty driver, so I’m driving all over the place doing different things. Then, I hear that cadence, and I’m like, “Oh, dang!” Well, I went and looked and there’s drill sergeant Rhoden—he’s not a drill sergeant at this point—but he’s marching troops back to this outfit and I followed him back. I went in there and we talked. We were cracking up. He was a really cool dude. That was the year that South Korean President Park Chung-hee was assassinated and we were on full alert status. I was stationed at Camp Casey, which is about 15 or 20 miles south of the DMZ [demilitarized zone]. So, when they put us on full alert status, I was in armor—the 1st and 72nd Armor over there—and our tanks were fully combat-loaded. All the main gun ammunitions stayed on the tanks. When we got the alert, we had to take the machine guns and mount them, we would grab machine gun ammunition, and we would carry .45 caliber pistols as our sidearms. So, we’re at a DEFCON 3 alert status and we can’t leave; we have to stay in our units. Well, a battalion commander approaches me and another guy who were jamming out down at the recreation center, and he says, “Y’all will be entertaining out troops at the EM Club.” We were like, “Yeah, no problem.” [laughs] We did that and played some other shows, too.

Also, it seems like every unit over there had a Korean photographer running around taking photos and selling them. Well, in my case, the guy’s name was Mr. Kim, and he invited me to his home for his daughter’s 18th birthday party. To me, that was a real honor. He was the only person I could communicate with that was there. [laughs] He told me to bring my guitar and I sang “Happy Birthday” to her in English. Then I just hung out, jammed a little more, and everyone was smiling and shaking hands. It was a pretty cool experience.

LS: Locally speaking, you’re a staple in the music scene. Lots of people know and respect your music. How do you respond to that?

RL: I feel blessed and honored that people dig what I do, and I feel that, as more time goes on, the fan base is building. Last time I played The Crowded House, we had a really good crowd. I play at Rockford’s Place in Greenville from time-to-time, too.

LS: You recorded the album Live at Rockford’s Place there.

RL: That’s a pretty cool album. It was recorded there. They have a sound booth upstairs with recording equipment and they gave me what they had recorded from my set. Then I took that and edited it down. The album came out really cool.

LS: Who are some of the people in the area that you respect and draw influence from musically?

RL: There are so many talented singer-songwriters around this area that I like and respect that it’s hard to mention them all—people like Pat Ballard, James Michael Harris, and Johnny Keyz just to name a few. There are just too many to mention here and in the surrounding counties. I find myself inspired by them because they’re out doing what they love to do. You know, some of them might be getting out a little more than I am, but with me, I’m also trying to find work. That’s why I’d like to be a fulltime musician. Id’ rather be worn out from doing what I love than doing anything else. A job gets in the way of the music, but I’ve got to pay the bills, you know?

LS: What kind of stuff have you been working on lately?

RL: Back in October of 2012, I went down to Beaird Music Group in Nashville, Tennessee and recorded a new song. But let me back up a little bit. My cousin [and country musician] John Berry was down in Nashville for the Inspirational Country Music Awards week and called me up and told me that all the people down there were really cool. He said that I needed to come down there and hang out. At the time, I was still working, so I took a couple of days off and went down there. One of the guys who was there came up to this jam session they were having on the roof of their hotel and he asked me if I was John Berry’s cousin. I told him I was, and he was like, “Well, get up there and play a song.” So I played some of my music and he comes up to me afterwards and says, “I’d like for you to send me some CDs.” I told him, “I ain’t gonna send you squat. I’ll go down to my truck and get some for you right now.” [laughs] Then he emails me a few days later and says that they’re working on a compilation CD and that John’s going to be on it. He said, “Wouldn’t it be a hoot if you were on there with your cousin?” I told him yeah, but I didn’t have a studio-quality track. So, in talking to John, I got hooked up with Beaird Music Group and wound up recording one of my songs called “Into Her Love” with them. I’m really proud of the way it came out. Around Thanksgiving, they sent the compilation CDs out to about 1,200 inspirational country music radio stations. As a result, my music has been played all over the country.

LS: What is “Into Her Love” all about?

RL: I used to live in Nashville years ago and I was running around near the South Loop, which is near the on-ramp to the freeway. Well, there’s a guy that usually stands there with a cardboard sign. Then, this particular day, this guy had written on the sign, “I want beer. Why lie?” That’s all he had on there. [laughs] I got to thinking about that, though. I was wondering what kind of journey the guy had been on and where he was going, and when I tell this story when I’m playing out somewhere people kind of giggle, but it’s a serious song. It’s a song of hope, of love, and of faith. The guy is trying to turn his life around and the family and kids are praying for him. It’s a really cool song when you look at the meaning and message.

LS: Is that a song you recently wrote?

RL: No, I’ve been playing it out for a while. I’ve played it at most of my recent shows. I don’t know how many years ago I wrote. It was probably around 15 years ago or so that I saw this guy and had the inspiration.

LS: What are you looking at for the future of your music? Are you looking to get a new album together?

RL: Well, I would love to have a benefactor. If I could find a benefactor or benefactors to help me follow the dream, I would love to record a full, 10-12 song album.

LS: Throughout your years of playing, what’s been one of your most memorable experiences?

RL: I’ve had a memorable experience that’s been going on for nine years now. As of last November, I’ve been playing for WPSD’s Chanel 6 Telethon of Stars out of Paducah, KY for nine years. It’s in support of the Lions Club and the Easter Seals. The funds they raise go to four different centers that aid those in the four surrounding states [Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, and Tennessee] with special needs. To me, that’s my holiday every year, just hanging out at the telethon. They pick a location, bring in some kids and adults with special needs, and the artists will go in—mostly the headliner and the co-headliners—and they’ll go around signing programs and whatnot. It’s like Christmas to most of them. It’s very humbling. I feel privileged and honored to be a part of it each year. Charlie Katterjohn, who’s a talent producer, saw me performing over at the Kentucky Opry over in Draffenville, KY a little over nine years ago and asked me if I wanted to be part of it. I’ve participated in the telethon every year since, for nine years straight. There’s just something about hanging out with the special needs folks that’s so great. They’re so appreciative and they stay for the entire 15 hours most of the time. You can go to Telethonofstars.org to find out more information. When we went off the air this last time, we were under $400,000, but more money was pledged—and more money always comes in than what was pledged—so now they’re up over $412,000 in the bank. Seeing that is amazing.

There’s a young lady there that I talk to who’s named Tammy Harris that I’ve adopted as my sister, and she calls me her big brother. I always run around during the event meeting people and networking, and a few years back, four or five years ago, right when they had moved the telethon over to the Carson Center, Tammy came up to me—and this was second year I’d seen her—and she hands me this envelope. It was a “Thank You” card with a photo in it of me and her at the autograph session. It was a great card. And here’s the thing—you never know how you’re going to touch somebody’s life just by talking to them. Well, when Tammy and I were talking, she was telling me that one of her close family members, like a godfather to her, had passed away. He was in the military, so I shared some of my Army experiences with her and we talked about how rough of a time it was for her. Then she told me, “When you talk to me, it’s like the weight of the world is lifted off my shoulders.” Heck, that’s the kind of thing that gets you right there. So, afterwards, I went back to the dressing room—and this was the year I was co-headlining—and I passed the card around to the guys who were jamming with me at the time and said, “This is what it’s all about.” There’s actually a song I wrote called “Touchin’ Folks with the Music.”

LS: That’s your mantra too, isn’t it?

RL: Yep, that’s my mantra; touchin’ folks with the music is what it’s really all about. And that situation with Tammy was just one of many where that concept applies. I’m a member of the Kentucky Country Music Association and, about two years ago, I competed in their statewide competition and went on to the nationals over in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. I did a couple songs there and one of them was called “Mother Dear,” which is a song I wrote about Alzheimer’s disease. When I was finished and had come back out, this couple who I had been talking to before followed me. Well, the girl had tears just streaming down her face because her daddy had just passed away three weeks earlier because of Alzheimer’s, so I gave them a CD and talked with them. It’s just times like that, you know, what can you say? If I talk about it too much more I’m going to start crying, because I just get choked up. To me, I just want to share the gift I’ve been given—it’s what I love to do and that’s what I want to do all the time.

LS: Is that ultimately what music is all about to you?

RL: Yes, it’s really all about touching people. You know, some people have their own genres that really work for them, but for me it’s about country, inspirational country, some gospel, and other stuff like that. To me, that’s where it’s at. When I listen to music, I want to understand and connect with what’s being said. Not being able to understand what’s being said is a pet peeve of mine. There are even headliners out there in the country world right now and you can’t understand a doggone thing they’re saying. Or, you go to concert and it’s so loud that you can’t understand what’s being said. I don’t want to do that. When I do a concert, I want to be just loud enough. I want my voice to be out there and I want the music to compliment that. I want it all to work together, but it seems like there are so many artists out there that aren’t doing that. So, when I do have an opportunity to go out and play, that’s one of the things I want to do. I want to make sure the people right off the stage are enjoying the music and that the people in the back can hear it. I want to make sure that nobody’s getting their eardrums blasted out.

LS: When you sit down to write a song, what’s your process?

RL: It’s really different for every song. I have lost so many song ideas over the years because I didn’t write them down. [laughs] I had another song idea the other day, but I didn’t write it down. It was so simple, but now I can’t remember. I can kind of remember little things, but I’d have to really sit down and focus on it. There were times back when I was living in Texas when I got out of the Army and was working as a machinist that I would hear a rhythm in the punching machines. I don’t remember which song it was, but I used that beat to back up the lyrics I wrote. There are other times that I’ll get a tune in my head and I’ll go home and try to find it on the guitar. There are times that it all comes together at the same time, too. I’ve had people give me poems that I’ll see if I can turn into a song sometimes. “Heart of Thunder” is a song that was originally a poem written by a friend, and there was a particular piece of music I’d been working on that fit with it pretty well. I didn’t have to change much at all. I haven’t sat down and written a lot lately, but it comes in spurts.

LS: Over the years, I’m sure you’ve accumulated a lot of song ideas. I bet you have a little stockpile somewhere.

RL: I’m an only child, but there have been plenty of families that I’ve been “adopted” into, and I had a “brother” that passed away down in Florida. I got to go down and see him one more time before he passed and I wrote a song for him. I played it out at the Lions Club here in Madisonville, which I’m a member of, and I think I may have played it out at a couple of other places, but I never looked at it as being finished. Well, while I was getting ready for my [NBC’s] The Voice audition in Atlanta, Georgia, I kind of pulled his song out to look over it. For starters, I don’t like doing acapella performances, but that’s what I had to do at the first round at the audition. So, I was trying to gear myself up to put the same amount of feeling into that kind of performance as I do when I have my guitar. So, after I started playing that song that I wrote for my brother and, after I had changed the arrangement a little, I felt like I could really feel the emotion behind it.

LS: How did your attempt at gaining a lasting spot on The Voice come about?

RL: There’s a young lady that lives down in the Nashville area whose name is Wynston Presley. She’s a pretty cool gal. I met her down there one time at my luthier’s shop—the guy who does all my guitar work—and she came in there, we started talking, and she sang some acapella stuff. She’s got a really powerful voice and we became pretty good friends. So, in trying to encourage me, her and her manager both said that I should try to go down to Atlanta and audition together. That’s how that came about. We all went together.

LS: What do you think are some of the positive aspects of the local music scene and how do you think it could be improved upon?

RL: A positive aspect is that we have a mess of awesome artists, awesome performers, and awesome songwriters. That is the positive thing. I would like to see more of the smaller venues around Madisonville and the general region opening up their doors to the singer-songwriter crew. It would be nice to do a larger scale show together every so often. A few years ago, I hosted a showcase of regional musicians at the Glema Mahr Center for the Arts and that was really cool. I would like to do that again sometime.

LS: And that was set up where people could come in and play and sing whatever they wanted?

RL: Right. I’m going to talk to Brad Downall about doing that again sometime soon. I love working with and mentoring younger musicians, too. I’ve played with Savana Poole here in town. She’s an awesome young lady and her mom and dad are very supportive of her. We played a show together at the Hillside Villa and at the Veteran’s Center in Hanson, where her grandfather was, in the same day around Christmas last year. I like doing stuff like that. I like giving back when I can.

LS: I’ve seen you play at the Lions Club a few times, too.

RL: I’ve played a mess of funerals, weddings, city events, and this, that, and the other over the years. I’ve had weddings where I’ve written a song for a specific theme.

Back when the Acoustic Café used to be open in Madisonville, I was a regular there. There was a lady named Marsha Coke from the Glema Center who came out and she brought her mom and dad. Her dad was suffering from Alzheimer’s and rarely left the rest home at the time, but he came to the show and I did “House of the Rising Sun.” After I got done playing that song, her dad came up to me and shook my hand and didn’t want to let go. Finally, they came and got him and went back to the table. Well, eventually, he passed away. So, they asked me to play at his funeral, and one of the songs they wanted me to do—because he had a really good time seeing me play it before and it was, as they said, the happiest he’d been in years—was the “House of the Rising Sun.” I played that and “Amazing Grace,” but that was probably the strangest song I’ve ever played at a funeral. I explained it to the people working with the funeral home and they understood, because it was special to his kids and his wife. It was just the last time he’d been able to have a really, really good time, so that made me feel really good. I do those kind of things for my heart, not for money.

There’s this song on Shenandoah’s 2000 album called “The Booger Song”, and it’s not something you’d want to play at a restaurant. [laughs] Well, I’m what you'd call a fulltime part-timer at the Glema Mahr Center, and one year a few years back, I was helping out with the Summer Arts Academy. So, this one day, they asked me to bring my guitar and play a few songs for the kids. I was like, “No problem.” Then, the next day, they’re all sitting there on the stage, I get up on a stool and I’m singing all these songs, and then I do “The Booger Song.” You get three different reactions here: one is “Huh?” another is “Ewww!” and another is laughter. [laughs] Most of them were cracking up, though. Then we went out front for pizza and one of the young men came up to me and said, “Mr. Ray-Ray,” which is one of my nicknames, “that booger song was inappropriate.” [laughs] It was funny, man. There are a lot of little things like that that have happened over the years that make it fun.

LS: So, what’s in the future for Ray Ligon?

RL: I would like to get to a point that I’m so busy with music that I don’t have to worry about a day job; a place where I can more than pay my bills. I want to be so fulltime that I can travel. I want to get a band pulled together eventually or some session players that I can get a schedule worked out with. I’d love to get a tour going where I can open up for someone, but it’s got to be right. I kind of feel like I’m in between a rock and a hard place, because I want it all so bad, but I’m so covered up with life and work and a job and this, that, and the other, that the music can sometimes seem like it's only a small portion of my life. It truly makes the music suffer. There are a lot of times you come home and are ready to sit back and relax instead of writing and practicing, you know? Then, on the other hand, I think about the success stories of other artists I’ve heard over the years: “Yeah, I moved to Nashville and lived in the back of my car for a month, but now I’ve made it.” Then I think that I have no room to complain. It’s a two-sided thing. I praise God for what I have, the talent he’s given me, and the desire I have to do it, but I just want more opportunities to get out and do it. I’d like to have three of four things every week, or more if I could. I’d like to branch out all over the world. I’d like to get to a point where I’m doing so well with music that I can help others, whether it’s in their dream of pursuing music or in their personal life. I’d like to be able to help the Lions Club out more, especially with their civic pursuits.

Locally, I’d like to see smaller venues opening up to entertainers during the week—not just on the weekend. Another thing I’d like to see are more family-oriented venues opening up. Places can still sell alcohol, while remaining family-friendly, like the Crowded House for example.

LS: In closing, feel free to say anything else you’d like.

RL: Well, I just want to say “Thank You” to all the fans who support what each and every performer around here likes to do. I’m just one of many in this area. We have a mess of great musicians and artists out here that deserve respect and support. All of us should have the respect and support here in our hometown. There’s a lot of great talent out there. I’d like to see that happen more and I’d like to be doing even more with music. I just want to live my life playing music.

To learn more about Ray Ligon and his music, visit his official site at www.RayLigon.com. You can also find Ray on Facebook.

To hear Ray’s music, click the ReverbNation player attached below this video or follow one of the following track links:

“Touchin’ Folks with the Music”
“It Feels Right”
“Mother Dear”

Sugg Street Post
Writing/Interview by Luke Short
Photos by Jeff Harp and Jessi Smith

 

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  • Published in Music

Laced Stitches Together Dynamic EP, ‘Reflections’

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (11/13/12)—Born from the embers of Despite the Fallen, the recently reconfigured Madisonville-based band, Laced, is rising in rank with the release of a hard-hitting debut EP entitled Reflections.  

From the infectious rhythms and melodies of “Anthem” and “MayHAM,” to the thunderous all-out assault of “Swamp Thing,” Reflections draws its name and content from what band members Brent Seaton (vocals/guitar), Taylor Sanders (drums), Matt Parker (bass), and Tim Cullen (lead guitar) describe as an eclectic list of musical influences. 

But how has Laced grown into the powerful foursome it is today and what are their plans for the future? 

Luckily, I was able to pay a visit to the band’s official practice “shed” deep in the hills of Manitou, KY soon after Reflections was released to find out the answers to these questions and more. 

Luke Short: What are the origins of Laced? 

Taylor Sanders: In late 2008, Brent and I—and this was right after I graduated high school—got together and tried to start something up, but nothing really happened with it because we had a hard time drawing in a larger fan base here in Madisonville. Plus, I was going to school in Tennessee at the time. Then, I came back in 2010, which was because my dad had a stroke in 2009, and we decided we’d try it again. I knew Tim from high school and it just kind of developed from there. 

Tim Cullen: I’m always down to jam. So, they just called me up and asked if I wanted to play and I was like, “Yeah, sure.” At the time, we were called Despite the Silence and we had a different bass player named Seth. He was a cool guy and we got along with him really well, but it just didn’t work out for personal reasons. So, Taylor knew Matt played bass and called him up to see if he wanted to jam, but he didn’t want to come out at first. 

Brent Seaton: Yeah, he thought the whole thing was a joke. He was going to come out just so he could make fun of us to our faces. He really was. [laughs]

Tim: He thought it was some nonsense, but then he came out and we’ve been spanking it ever since, just getting better. We’ve all been playing together for about six months now. 

Taylor: Since Parker’s come around, our whole “charisma” has changed, because Matt’s more funk oriented in the way he plays bass.

Matt Parker: I probably play slap [style] a lot. More than I should probably. 

Taylor: But Matt brought up a good point. He said, “The music you guys are playing is really cool, but I feel like we should not only make it more funky, but should also write music to accommodate Brent’s vocals better.” That’s the direction we’re taking now and it’s really taking off now that he’s here.

LS:  So, how do you guys write songs? Is there one person who’s the official “songwriter” for the band? 

Matt: Usually, Brent writes all the lyrics. With the music itself, though, we just get together, start jamming different stuff, and take the parts we all like. If we like it, we keep it; if we don’t we just scrap it. 

Taylor: We seriously talk maybe ten percent of the time we’re practicing. The rest of the time is straight jamming. 

Tim: With that kind of approach, there’s not really any kind of plan behind it. We just do what we do. 

Brent: Every time we play, we come up with something new and different, too. 

Matt: We were even able to write one of the songs that are on the EP at the studio while we were recording. I mean, we wrote the music and vocals in about one hour and 20 minutes. 

LS: You mentioned that there were several reasons the band’s original name had to be changed—a new direction, trademark issues, etcetera—but why did you all decide to go with Laced? How does the name fit with what you’re all about? 

Matt: We feel like we our style is mixed with a lot of different types of rock. For instance, “Swamp Thing” is hard, but we also have more chilled out and funk inspired songs on the EP, too. 

Taylor: Basically, what we play is rock n’ roll laced with all our other different influences. 

LS: And what or who are some of the band’s influences? 

Brent: Slash—the guy plastered up on the wall right there [points to a several Slash posters on the walls of the practice space]. 

Matt: I dig bands like Incubus and 311, and other stuff like that. I draw some influence from hip-hop, too. 

Tim: I listen to a lot of metal, but right now I’m purposefully trying not to listen to too much rock because I also end up taking riffs from stuff I hear and trying to play them with the band. Instead, I’ve been listening to dubstep and anything else that’s kind of off the wall. 

Taylor: The Californication album by the Red Hot Chili Peppers that came out in the mid ‘90s pretty much shaped how I play drums. I always underestimated [Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer] Chad Smith, because a lot of what he does in songs isn’t really that extravagant, but if you watch videos of him playing by himself, you realize that he’s a boss. He’s disgustingly good. 

LS: How many shows have you all played since you reformed, so to speak? 

Matt: Since I’ve been with the band, we’ve played two shows in Bowling Green, four shows here in Madisonville [including the latest show at Elite Tattoo Lounge] and we played at the Hard Rock Café in Nashville a little over a month ago. We've got a couple local shows coming up, too. Of course, we'll be playing at the Sugg Street Post launch party on Tuesday, November 20th, but we've also got another show coming up at Legends in Madisonville on November 24th. 

LS: What was it like playing at the Hard Rock in Nashville? 

Brent: It was awesome. There were about 600 people there checking us out. 

Taylor: It’s been one of—if not the best—show we’ve played so far. 

Tim: It was really nuts in there. That was the biggest crowd we’ve played for.

Taylor: Yeah, there were so many people packed in there that everyone had to hold their cups in the air to get through to the bathroom. 

LS: How did playing there come about? 

Tim: We were actually competing against 16 other bands while we were there, and we got second place. We were supposed to play an encore, but we didn’t. 

Taylor: We lost to a band all the way from New Zealand, so second place was a pretty awesome accomplishment. 

LS: Though you guys have some comparatively slower and more relaxed songs on Reflections, most of what you play is on the heavier side of rock. With that in mind, has it been harder to gain a real fan base in a primarily bluegrass, blues and southern rock-oriented region? 

Matt: Honestly, I think it’s kind of hard to get a lot of attention and support in our community period, regardless of what style you play. Everyone always complains and says there’s nothing to do in our town, but when you offer something up—like a concert—there aren’t a whole lot of people that actually come out and check things out. 

Taylor: It’s so weird. You can create an event on Facebook and have 300 people committed to attend, but when the show happens, about four of those people actually show up. Right now, it just seems that there’s no market locally, so that’s why we’ve played out of town more.  

LS: Why do you all think that is? Is it simply a lack of venues in Madisonville?

Matt: I think that that’s a big part of it, but we’re also a really loud band. When we play, it’s seriously loud, and we tell people that before we ask to play on their stage. We mean no disrespect whatsoever, but we’re not going to "sugarcoat" it. For that reason, we just can’t play places like The Crowded House in Madisonville.

Taylor: My boss [Cliff Nance] actually owns The Crowded House and he’s asked me several times why we haven’t played there yet. I just tell him that I really respect The Crowded House, but we’re just not a part of that “scene.” We rock out. I would love to play there, and that facility is seriously nice, but if we played there I feel like people would be like, “This is too loud. I’m leaving.” 

Matt: You know, I guess we could give acoustic stuff a shot, but that’s just not our style. 

Tim: Though we totally respect it as musicians, we just jam too hard to do softer acoustic stuff. 

LS: The new EP, Reflections, is the first album Laced has ever put out. How did the opportunity to record your music come about and how was it playing in a studio? 

Tim: We’ve been to a couple different studios actually. We recorded some stuff in Ben [Laskowski’s] SoundBox Inc. studio back when we were still Despite the Silence, but none of the tracks were ever put out. Then we went down to Murfreesboro, Tennessee right after the first bass player quit and the mix just wasn’t right. Finally, Matt got in touch with The Fair-Weather Kings and Rory [Willis] with Grey Skull Recordings down in Bowling Green, and that’s where we recorded Reflections. It’s the best studio we’ve been to. 

Taylor: It’s a really simplistic studio, too. Rory just rents this place out and lives there with his girlfriend. They basically use the kitchen, bathroom, and bedroom, while the rest of the place is strictly business. 

Tim: Rory’s really talented in his own right. He just listened to our live stuff and figured out how he wanted to do things, which I’m sure he does with a lot bands that record there. He told us that he didn’t want to do a timed-out “click track” with us, which is kind of crazy. Instead, he wanted to record us actually playing together, like a live setting. 

Taylor: When Rory said that, it kind of freaked me out and I thought it wouldn’t work. I thought it was suicide, but Rory explained that “click tracks” are really more for editing purposes. He made a good point and he told us that if we felt confident enough, he’d much rather record us live. He told us that he personally likes recording bands without a “click track” because the energy of the music is more natural in the recording. 

LS: How long did it take to record the album taking the “live” approach? 

Matt: [laughs] It seriously took us about five hours to finish. We came in there and played and Rory just knocked it out. That’s just how good he is. 

Taylor: Rory’s mixing is on point for sure. He had the finished copy back to us in about eight days. The whole time we were playing, out friend Tyler watched him and told us that Rory was all over the place tweaking knobs, messing with the mix. 

LS: Did you all use your own equipment when recording or did you use stuff Rory had at Grey Skull? 

Brent: Everything we used was basically ours except for the drum set. 

Taylor: The situation with the drums really baffled me, because when I looked at the drum set he had there, I was kind of like, “Dang, this sucks.” Rory saw me eyeballing the set and was like, “I know it doesn’t look like much—and when you play them, it won’t sound that good either—but I have it all set up so that the EQ will be just about perfect on the recording.” And they sounded awesome, just like he said. 

Tim: At the time, Brent and I were both running Fender [212 model] Frontman amps and mine blew up while we were recording. Fortunately, Rory had this Marshall [MG 100] amp stack on-hand, so I used it and really liked the sound of it. From there, I was like, “Screw it, let’s go buy one,” and that’s what we did. So that’s what I’m using now. 

LS: You all chose to call the album Reflections? What was the reasoning behind that? 

Taylor: Basically, the album is kind of a reflection of our influences, more or less. It’s our first form of credibility, too. And honestly, our parents and all of our friends and peers, are like, “OK, Taylor got a drum set when he was 12-years-old and he never outgrew it.” They’ve never actually taken our “hobby” seriously, but this isn’t really a hobby at all; we’re definitely trying to make a career out of this. There’s always going to be haters, but that’s just how it is. It’s either playing music and doing what we like, or working a miserable nine-to-five job. I know which one I’d rather do at the end of the day. 

Matt: Before the release of the album, it was hard to get gigs, too. All they had to go on were videos or recordings of our live shows. With those, it’s nearly impossible to really hear what us, or any band, actually sounds like. Now we have something that’s solid. 

LS: So what’s next on the plate for Laced next? A full album perhaps? 

Taylor: Finishing a full album is one of the next big things on our “to do” list. We’ve already got a ton of music that’s just floating around, too. It’s really pretty disgusting how many songs we’ve created but haven’t officially written down yet. 

Matt: We’re writing stuff here and there, and we’ve got a lot of music that we’ve already put together that we can work with, but we’re focusing on playing shows and promoting Reflections as much as we can at the moment. From there, we’re looking to have all new songs on the full album when it’s released.

LS: Any final shout-outs? 

Brent: We want to give a shout out to Undead Anna, The Fair-Weather Kings, Pat Ballard and 93.9WKTG for the interview and for playing our song live, and to Dairy Queen.  

Want to check out Laced live? If so, Laced will be performing this upcoming Tuesday, November 20th during the Sugg Street Post launch party at Focus Photography Studio (4160 Nebo Rd., Madisonville, KY) from 6-midnight, and will also be playing at Legends Bar in Madisonville starting at 9pm on November 24th. And even if you can't attend, you can give Laced a listen by downloading Reflections from BandCamp.com, via their ReverbNation page, or through their official Facebook fan page. You can also listen to each track from their new album by clicking the song titles on the ReverbNation player attached beneath this article (NOTE: some songs may contain "explicit" or "offensive" lyrics). 

As of this writing, the band is also working toward the unveiling of their official website, the sale of their tracks via iTunes, and the creation of a Laced SoundCloud.

If you would like to book Laced for your next event or simply have a question for the band, please contact them via email at laced42431@gmail or send them a message on Facebook.

Sugg Street Post 
Written by Luke Short
Photos by Jeff Harp

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