Displaying items by tag: bass

  • Published in Music

Fair-Weather Kings – Weathering Bowling Green’s Rolling Musical Seas

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (8/22/13)—Hearing it from the proverbial “horse’s mouth” makes it official: “energetic” ranks highest among the descriptors fans use to define the sound and feel of Bowling Green, KY’s beloved five-piece band, the Fair-Weather Kings. And it’s a fact that is duly justifiable. Comparison-wise, many say the quintet’s unique style is akin to the vibrant, nationally-acclaimed indie sounds of The Strokes and The Arctic Monkeys.

Yet, once you start trying to dial in their insightful works any further—to do their sound justice through words, so to speak—the process of classification becomes much deeper and, perhaps, more metaphysical. That being said, here’s my personal take: the Fair-Weather Kings strike hard on the head of modernity’s pop-rock stake, while remaining punctual, compositionally edgy, fun, and experimental in a not-too-abstract way. Their lyrical originality, atmospheric grooves, and consistently frantic, multi-layered live performances—which come courtesy of vocalist/guitarist Wesley Stone, guitarist Zach Barton, bassist Jason Williams, keyboard/synth player Craig Brown, and drummer Marcus Long— mix together well, producing a seemingly perfect storm amidst an electric and inspirational musical climate.

While the Fair-Weather Kings have yet to gain a large-scale, national following, they have received a wealth of veneration from all corners of our region and beyond. In fact, the respect the Fair-Weather Kings have deservedly garnered from their peers since forming just under two years ago is evidenced by the fact that they have remained afloat, relevant, and well-loved in the virtual sea of talent found in Bowling Green.

So how do the Fair-Weather Kings maintain their prowess in such a saturated musical market? What’s their origin story and creative process? And what is their ultimate goal with music? To find out the answers to these questions and much more, I recently got the chance to speak with FWK frontman and guitarist, Wesley Stone, who informed me that weathering west Kentucky’s blooming and inspirational entertainment scene isn’t always an easy task to master.

Who are the members of the Fair-Weather Kings, where is each member from, what are your ages, and what instrument(s) do each of you play?

I’m Wesley Stone and I’m on lead vocals and guitar. Zach Barton plays guitar, Jason Williams is our bassist, Craig Brown plays keys/synth, and Marcus Long is our drummer. Zach, Marcus and I grew up in Hopkins County, KY. Craig and Jason grew up in Bowling Green. We all currently live in Bowling Green. We are all in our late 20’s, with the exception of Marcus, who is in his early 30’s.

How and when did the band first form?

We first formed in October of 2011 with Zach and I just sort of jamming around on occasion and presenting songs to each other. After a bit, we tracked down a drummer and bass player to sort of feel out the whole band thing. After a couple months, we had worked out a few songs, but our drummer and bass player at the time weren’t really a good fit with the type of music we were writing, so that’s when Marcus joined, along with another friend of ours, Will Kronenberger, who played bass. Shortly after they joined, we picked up Rory Willis to play keys, who was Will’s roommate at the time and the owner and operator of Greyskull Recordings. We all wrote and worked on the songs that would end up on our debut, self-titled EP and played our first show in January of 2012.

Where did the name of the band originate and how does it fit with the music or “feel” of the band?

The name sort of became a formality at a certain point. We knew we had to call ourselves something, so we just started throwing out a bunch of ideas over the course of a week or so. Ultimately, “The Fair-Weather Kings” came about when we combined two of our favorite names that we had come up with. I can’t really remember what those were, though. Fair-Weather….something and something…Kings. There isn’t really any intended significance as far as the name representing our music or style. I’m sure I could dig up some philosophical meaning to it, but, really, it was just the first name that we all agreed upon that remotely sounded cool.

What influences do you all draw inspiration from both musically and in life?

We have a wide variety of musical influences—too many to even begin listing them—but we all draw from some variety of rock or pop music, and we all have our own favorite singer-songwriters. We also get inspiration from the many great bands we hang out with and play with around Bowling Green. Mainly, our songs are inspired by love, life, and the universe, and revolve around observations within each.

How has the band changed over time?

The biggest change that has occurred for us has been losing and gaining members. Will and Rory got busy with their jobs and other projects, and that is when Jason and Craig stepped in. They both came in with completely different styles than Will and Rory, which ultimately changed our sound. But it was for the better. Each previously written song has since evolved into something that is, in many ways, completely different from what you hear in our recordings, which were all done with Will and Rory. Again, this evolution has been for the better. The songs have gotten tighter and even experimental at times, which make them fun and different every time we play them live. You will very rarely hear the exact same version of a song from show to show.

How do you all define the sound of the Fair-Weather Kings?

That’s always a hard question to answer, and I usually just refer to what others have compared it to or said. The most common word used to describe our music is “energetic,” and we have been compared to The Strokes and The Artic Monkeys.

Like you just said, a good deal of the Fair-Weather Kings’ music is highly energetic and, at times, feverishly frantic, which comes across well during your live shows. By the same token, you all seem to be very tightly-knit as a multi-piece band. That being said, how do you approach the creative process? Do songs come together spontaneously or is it more of an intensive, day-by-day process?

The majority of our songs were songs that I had already written or were nearly complete ideas that I then presented to the entire band. From there, everyone just sort of filled in the gaps with each of us giving the others input and experimenting with various ways to approach them. However, we have also written several songs that blossomed out of a jam session during practice.

While the band’s sound is ultimately rooted in rock, you all also incorporate a variety of electronic, synthesized sounds in your music through guitar effects and keys/synthesized sounds. Do you think it’s important to remain open to different sonic avenues in the modern age for the sake of creativity?

We keep ourselves open to various sounds and even various styles for the sake of creativity. I think if we confined ourselves to a specific sound, or tried to write songs that adhere to a specific style or sound, it would hinder us creatively. We are constantly picking up things from other bands and each other, which steers each new song or idea in a slightly different direction.

You guys hail from one of the region’s most vibrant music scenes—Bowling Green, KY. How much of an effect has that environment had on the band’s approach and creative evolution?

It has its positives and negatives. On one hand, all the bands are learning, supporting, and challenging each other to become better. On the other hand, it’s a constant struggle to keep from getting lost in the mix of all these great bands and musicians in the area. Either way, we are proud to call Bowling Green home and love being associated with its rising music scene.

You all played at the inaugural Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival in Madisonville this past June. Why did you all decide to play the festival and what was your overall take on the event?

It sounded like a fun time. Again, Zach, Marcus, and I grew up in the area and still have friends and family there, so it seemed like a great opportunity to not only play our music to some different faces, but to also visit with some familiar ones. We had a great time and got some great feedback on our set.

If I’m not mistaken, your self-titled EP and single, “Satellite Galaxies”, were both recorded at Greyskull Recordings in Bowling Green. Tell me a little bit about what it’s like recording there.

During those recording sessions, Rory Willis was still our keyboard player. We recorded all the tracks on the EP in a “live” fashion where everyone was being recorded at the same time, minus the vocals, so, really, it was just like a more structured and professional practice—except we played every song a dozen times. We did “tracking” for Satellite Galaxies, meaning we each recorded our parts individually. That process is slightly boring, but produces a much higher quality end product. It also allows for changes, and gave Rory the ability to piece together the best parts of each take.

Are you guys working on any new music at the moment?

Yes. We have two new songs that we have been playing live for a while that haven’t been recorded, and we are currently working through some ideas for at least three more. We are taking our time with the new material—screening it so to speak. The first album was composed of literally every song that was presented. This time around, we are being a bit pickier and are presenting lots of ideas that will be narrowed down to a few songs at a time.

From your perspective, why is it important for area citizens to get out and support local musicians and artists?

Because most of those local musicians and artists want to be national musicians and artists, and the road to that outcome is paved by every single person’s support.

Over the years, what’s been one of the band’s favorite shows and/or biggest accomplishments?

One of our best shows was a house-show at a place dubbed The Manor. It is right next to Greyskull—which is where we rehearsed at the time—in the basement of this old Civil War hospital that is now a private residence. There were a ton of people all giving us as much energy as we were giving them. Those are the best types of crowds. I’ll take a crowd of 20 people that are all getting into the music over 2,000 motionless bodies any day, and that’s when we put on the best show, too. It’s a give and take relationship when it comes to our performances, and we were getting and giving quite a bit at The Manor that night.

What is the end goal for the Fair-Weather Kings?

Ultimately, we want to reach as many people as possible with our music. So, short answer: major label support.

Where and how can people check you out and purchase your music?

We have a ReverbNation profile, as well as a Bandcamp profile. We don’t really charge for digital downloads, and both places have all of our recorded material for free. We have physical copies of our debut EP, which we have re-released with “Satellite Galaxies” for sale on our Bandcamp page. We have stickers and t-shirts for sale there as well. Of course, you can pick up any of those things at our shows, too.

In closing, feel free to give any shout-outs you want.

All of our fellow BG Sceners…
Canago, Buffalo Rodeo, Morning Teleportation, Schools, Chris Rutledge, Sleeper/Agent, Cage the Elephant, Opossum Holler, The Reneaus, The Beech Benders, Plastic Visions, The Black Shades, Lost River Cavemen, Fat Box, The Hungry Ears, Technology vs Horse, and others…

Also…
D93 WDNS, Revolution 91.7 WWHR, Spencer’s Coffee House, and Greyskull Recordings.


____________________________________________________________________

Want to hear the Fair-Weather Kings right now? Check out the ReverbNation player attached below this article. Want to support the band by downloading some Fair-Weather Kings tracks or purchasing some merchandise? Visit the official FWK BandCamp page by clicking here.

For more information on the Fair-Weather Kings, such as upcoming shows and updated news, visit their official Facebook page by clicking here.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos by Jessi Smith

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West Kentucky Wild: Finding Late Winter, Early Spring Bass and Crappie

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HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (3/4/13) - A former Kentucky State BASS Federation Champ and longtime outdoorsman, Nick Short has spent over five decades learning the "ins and outs" of the hunting and fishing world. From coon-hunting as a youth, to hanging with fishing pros as an adult, Nick knows a thing or two about how it’s done outdoors. Want to know his secrets? Check out his latest installment of “West Kentucky Wild.”

The pre-spawn period, which is currently underway, offers some of the best fishing of the entire year. From now until the time the fish actually move onto their spawning beds can be excellent for both crappie and bass.

But where should you start looking?

Location, location, location...

For many businesses, getting the right location can make the difference between success and failure. This also applies to finding late winter to early, early spring fishing. If you fish a small pond, start anywhere.

But what if you fish in larger bodies of water?

North by Northwest is not only a 1959 American thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, it's also a specific geographic description of the banks you need to be concentrating on in your favorite lakes as winter slowly releases her grip.

As the year begins to evolve from the short, wintry days of February, we merge into March and the the length of daylight (sunlight) gradually increases. During this time, the sun is positioned at an angle where the maximum amount of sunlight warms these northern and northwest banks first. Fish are cold-blooded and will seek this warmer water. As a result, it's during this time of year that water that's even just a few degrees warmer makes a great deal of difference in where the fish are located.

As the prevailing winds begin to shift and start blowing from a southerly direction, you will see additional warmer water being pushed onto these banks. However, while this does help, continue to look on these banks for any coves, cuts, indentations, or points of land that block off the wind. These areas allow the sun's rays to quickly warm the calmer water. Clear water will always warm up faster than stained or muddy water.

As the water temperatures leave the 40's and begin their upward climb through the 50's, all species of fish will become more active as they begin to increase their feeding habits in preparation for the spawning ritual, which is also triggered by water temp's and moon phases.

With these facts in mind, it's clear that now is the time to begin your quest for some of the best fishing of the year. Good luck and be safe. 

Final Word:  Spring surely can't be that far away? Any day now, I expect to hear the "spring peepers" croaking, and to hear the sound of the red-winged black bird announcing their official declaration of spring. Welcome back...

With these tips in-tow, you should also be better prepared for Winding Creek Bait & Tackle's seasonal Crappie Tournament, which is currently underway. Who knows, you may just snag that $250 cash prize for the biggest (weight-wise) crappie - but don't forget to register beforehand. For more information on the tournament and registration, click here.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Nick Short

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  • Published in Music

Chasing the White Buffalo with 'Home Videos'

BOWLING GREEN, KY (2/24/13)—Intense, yet spacious vocals, snappy and often times energetically raw guitar work, a striking wall of synthesized sounds, thick bass lines, and a varied mix of splashing cymbal and sharp drum work define much of the musical catalogue created by Bowling Green-based band, Buffalo Rodeo.

From the juxtaposition of chaotic breaks and joyously insightful lyrics found in “A. Hook” on the band’s 2012 sophomore album, Common Cults, to the ethereally impassioned feel of their latest single, “Cargo,” Buffalo Rodeo’s music is fresh, inspiring, and, in a sense, spiritual. And with a new EP, Home Videos, set for release in March, there’s no doubt that the unique musical atmosphere they have created will expand. 

Never heard of this progressive band of musical gypsies?

Even if you haven’t, the Sugg Street Post recently got the chance to interview the up-and-coming five-piece to find out what the story is behind their name, their influences, plans they have for the future, and much more. And, like their sweeping, experimental compositions, the individual and collectively-voiced answers they offered us are perhaps some of the most original responses we’ve received so far—and that’s a really great thing.

Luke Short: Who are the members of Buffalo Rodeo and where are you all from?

Buffalo Rodeo: Buffalo Rodeo is comprised of Zach Preston on vocals, Ryan Gilbert on drums, Nathaniel Davis on guitars, Jordan Reynolds on keys and vocals, and Patrick Duncan on bass. We all reside in Bowling Green.

LS: How and when did you all meet up and start jamming?

BR: There was an earthquake and we met under a rainbow of glorious salvation and love; forever.

LS: What is the meaning behind your name, and how does it fit with your music?

BR: We have a neighbor who is really into Native American culture and he also used to be a bull rider. However, one night while he was meditating and smoking the medicinal and spiritual holy plant, God came down to him from high and said, “Two Rivers”—which was his name—“your destiny is to ride the great white buffalo,” and when he told us about this, we knew that our calling had come. We named ourselves thusly: Buffalo Rodeo. Amen.

LS: Do you define your music by a certain genre?

BR: Progressive indie experimental alternative rock.

LS: What are all the albums you’ve released since forming?

BR: We released Wanderers in 2011, Common Cults in 2012, and are in the process of finishing our latest EP, Home Videos, which is due for release in March.

LS: So, what's the story behind the new release? Where are you recording it? 

BR: We're recording Home Videos at Greyskull Recording Studios here in Bowling Green. We're really excited to release this EP because the music is a lot different than any of the other stuff we've previously recorded. It's also going to be the first recordings we have with Jordan and Patrick on them.

LS: Who are some of your major influences musically?

BR: Portugal. The Man, Local Natives, Manchester Orchestra, Arcade Fire, and Band of Horses.

LS: Who are some of your major influences outside of music?

BR: Family, God, and friends.

LS: With a lot of your music, there is this sense of spaciousness and freedom, as well as some powerful emotional chaos. Is that something intentional or does it all come out spontaneously when you’re jamming and recording together?

BR: A lot of our music has evolved from spontaneous jamming; however, we also spend a lot of time deliberately and meticulously sifting through each part to make sure that everything sounds as it should. So, in essence, our music is the product of spontaneity and careful decision.

LS: What kind of instruments do you use?

BR: Bass - Fender P. Bass and Warwick Powerbass; Drums - Ludwig Vistalites; Keys - Nord Electro 2 and Roland Juno-Stage; Vocals - baller-ass chops; Nate - an excessive amount of rare, vintage, badass gear that only a gearhead would be able to identify properly.

LS: What are some of the most memorable places playing music has taken you?

BR: [Bowling Green’s] Starry Nights Festival and Movers and Shakers in Chicago.


LS: Who are some of BR’s favorite local bands?

BR: Cage the Elephant, Sleeper Agent, Morning Teleportation, Mahtulu, The Black Shades, The Fair-Weather Kings, Canago, Heavy Chase, and Schools.

LS: You guys are based out of Bowling Green, KY, and there’s a very strong music and arts scene there—and has been for a long time now. What are some the components of BG that keep the scene alive and strong in your opinion?

BR: Honestly, one big component in the BG scene is the fact that there’s not that much to do in Bowling Green…besides play music. The things that people do on the weekends mostly consists of going to a show. There’s constantly music being played or watched. There’s also a big respect for music that goes on. We have a lot of inspiration from our peers—people like Cage and Sleeper Agent and other bands that have gone out and tried to make a name for themselves.

LS: For a community like Madisonville and Hopkins County that is just starting to really grow artistically, is there any advice you can offer to improve upon the scene here?

BR: Start more bands, play more music. It always helps to have a good venue in the area, so out of town bands can come in and play as well. Get a decent sized bar to invest in a good sound system and start having shows.

LS: What is BR’s ultimate goal with music?

BR: We’d like to do this, for real. We want to tour and play music for our lives and not have to have other jobs. Music is what we love, and we want to do it always.

LS: What kind of plans do you have for the future?

BR: In the short future, we’re just going to tour as much as possible and get our name out there to people in other places. We just got a van, so we’re really excited to get out on the road. After that, we’d love to get picked up by a record label of some type and release a full record. That would be tight.



LS: Where can people check you out?

BR: You can check us out at www.facebook.com/buffalorodeo, buffalorodeo.bandcamp.com, and on Twitter @buffalorodeo.

LS: In closing, feel free to give some shout-outs.

BR: We want to give a shout-out to Jordan’s dad for being a cool guy, to Greyskull recordings for recording our EP, and to Richard, our neighbor, for painting that cow skull in our living room.

Want to check out Buffalo Rodeo’s music right now? Simply click on the the ReverbNation player attached below this article, visit their official Facebook page, or check out some of the links mentioned above.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos provided by Sean Marshall Studios/Buffalo Rodeo

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West Kentucky Wild: Cold Water Bass

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (1/22/13)—A former Kentucky State BASS Federation Champ and longtime outdoorsman, Nick Short has spent over five decades learning the ins and outs of the hunting and fishing world. From coon-hunting as a youth, to hanging with fishing pros as an adult, Nick knows a thing or two about how it’s done outdoors. Want to know his secrets? Check out his latest installment of “West Kentucky Wild.”

Let’s face it, all that new fishing gear you got for Christmas is just sitting there waiting—and it’s driving you crazy! You’re fired up and ready to go, only there’s a couple problems. For one, it’s colder than heck, and there’s even a thin film of ice in some places on your favorite lake. That brings out the second problem: water temperatures stuck in the low 40’s.

Though I can’t help much in the way of fixing either one, I can tell you that the fish will bite if you can get around that whole “ice thing.”

What to Throw?

1.) Rubber-Skirted Bass Jigs

As far as color, stick with black, brown, or a black and blue combo. Start with a ¼ ounce weight and go as high as a ½ ounce. An old-school #11 Uncle Josh “Pork Frog” will complete this big fish killer. Fish it slow, then even slower; make sure to keep it touching the bottom. Strikes will range from a “mushy” feeling to a distinctive thump. If you think you got a bite, a “jerk” style hook set is free.

2.) Suspending Minnow Jerk Baits (Long, slender minnow imitators)

The choices are endless as practically every lure manufacturer makes one. Prices will vary from relatively reasonable to $20 or more per lure. Some good, affordable choices include Smithwick’s “Rogue,” Strike King’s “Wild Shiner,” or any models by Luck “E” Strike. Those that are four to five inches in length seem to work best, and they perform at their peak in deeper, “clear” water. For these, stick with shad or minnow color.

These lures are not hard to learn about or use. Simply make a long cast (usually with a mono or fluorocarbon line that’s 12lbs or less), crank it five or six turns, let the bait just sit, twitch it a couple times, and repeat the process. Don’t be afraid to vary the length of time you let it sit; in the end, the fish will tell you how long. In colder water, fish will often swipe at this lure while it’s sitting still, so watch your line.

Local angler, Wayne Adams, shows proof that cold water bass will bite! This fish, along with several others, were taken during an outing on January 20th with fellow angler, Daniel Davis. As Daniel noted, most of the damage was done with suspending minnow jerk baits. Daniel also said the bites got better as it warmed up and that he got plenty of experience netting. Thanks for the pics and info.

PHOTO: Local angler, Wayne Adams, shows proof that cold water bass will bite! This fish, along with several others, were taken during an outing on January 20th with fellow angler, Daniel Davis. Most of the damage was done with suspending minnow jerk baits. Daniel said the bites got better as it warmed up, and that he got plenty of experience netting. Thanks for the pics and info, Daniel.

3.) Crank Baits

Grab some Rapala “Shad Raps,” models SR5 or SR7, in crawfish or shad color. These are cold water standards. Additionally, any flat-sided cranks, such as Bomber “Flat A’s” in fire-tiger—or any of the crawfish colors—should also work. With these, smaller to mid-size seems to work best in colder water. Just remember that the water is cold. Slow your retrieve and don’t expect it to get a ton of bites.

FINAL WORD: Dress warm, be extremely cautious, and, if at all possible, take somebody with you. From there, give these lures and techniques a shot—you might just be in for a surprise!

If you need any of the lures mentioned, or any others, go see Barbara Wiles of Winding Creek Bait & Tackle at 1635 Eastview Dr. in Madisonville (270-825-9997) or visit her website by clicking here. And remember, if she doesn’t have it, she will get it for you!

Sugg Street Post
Written by Nick Short
Column logo/photo by Jeff Harp

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Gear Guide—Matt Parker’s Warwick Custom Corvette Bass

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (1/11/13)—Good music is born from a musician’s experiences, feelings, or ideas. Yet, without the proper instrument, attaining the desired expression and personality of a song can be difficult or nearly impossible. Fortunately, modern musicians have a plethora of finely tuned options at their disposal. From variations in tonewoods, string gauge, and speaker construction, to the customization of electronic pickups, drum heads, microphones, and beyond, contemporary players have the ability to dial in exactly what they want or need to get their “dream tone.”

But, on the flip side, figuring out the differences between each of these options can become a major, and often times confusing, learning process. That’s the beauty of it, though—it takes time to age into a fine musician.

So, instead of trying to lay everything out on the proverbial table, the Sugg Street Post would like to bring you periodic information about the instruments area musicians use to get the sound you hear live or on their records. Enter: The Gear Guide.

For this installment of The Gear Guide, we would like to bring you a closer look at Matt Parker's Warwick Custom Corvette $$ four-string bass (seen in photos).

When you first meet Matt, his height and stature are immediately noticeable—he’s a big guy. Fortunately, his bass tone and skills are equally expansive. From defined and poppy funk-style slapping, to dirty, all-out wallops, Matt provides a solid rhythmic foundation for local band, Laced. Yet, beyond his choice of slapping or picking, how does Matt produce such a bone-rattling, low-end punch? Read on.

2007 Warwick Custom Corvette $$ Double – Tech Specs

Pickups—Two active/passive MEC humbucking pickups with coil-tapping capabilities

Body Wood/Design—Double cutaway Swamp Ash body

Neck Wood—Ovangkol (or Mozambique) neck with Wenge fingerboard

Neck Shape/Style—Bolt-on with rounded profile, satin finish

Finish—Opaque black satin stain (wood grain visible through finish); no binding

Tuners—Custom Warwick machine heads

Bridge/Tailpiece—Warwick standard, 2 pieces

Volume/Tone Controls—Two coil-tap mini-toggle switches; a push-pull active/passive control; 3-band EQ

The amp head Matt uses with his Warwick Custom Corvette $$ is a Peavey 600 Touring Class-D. The amp head is connected to a 4X10 Hartke XL speaker cabinet, which projects the sound. Additionally, Matt uses an Aguilar brand Tone Hammer preamp pedal for added EQ control and extra overdrive/distortion.

While many a bass connoisseur—or guitar aficionado for that matter—can appreciate Matt’s custom instrument and the unique tonewoods it is constructed from, how did Matt first get his hands on the four-string masterpiece?

“I originally bought a Warwick Thumb Bass in early 2000 and I used it until the on-board EQ went out,” says Matt. “Then, I saw the Corvette $$ on Craigslist. The guy who had it wanted to trade, so I rolled down to Nashville, Tennessee. I was able to trade even for it, which was pretty sweet.”

In regard to the tone he can get from it, as well as why he wanted to snatch it up, Matt explains that, “Warwick is known for their ‘evil-like’ growl, which has a lot to do with the unique woods they use. So that’s actually a lot of what attracted me to play it in the first place. I love that crazy growl when I play.”

Matt also notes that the included coil-tapping switches (both of which are situated adjacent to the tone/volume controls) make it easy to get either a thinner, Fender P-Bass type tone or a grittier, humbucking-style sound right on the spot.

Want to hear what Matt’s bass and setup sounds like? If so, take a listen to a lineup of original Laced tracks by clicking the ReverbNation player attached below this article. You can also check out Laced’s newest single, “Overrated,” which will appear on their upcoming freshman album release, by clicking here.

To check out more on Laced—and music in general—check out the Sugg Street Post’s “The Lounge” section by clicking here.

Want us to feature your favorite piece of gear? Contact us by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or through our official Facebook page.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos by Jeff Harp

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Gear Guide—Landon Miller’s Custom G&L

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (12/20/12)—Good music is born from a musician’s experiences, feelings, or ideas. Yet, without the proper instrument, attaining the desired expression and personality of a song can be difficult or nearly impossible. Fortunately, modern musicians have a plethora of finely tuned options at their disposal. From variations in tonewoods, string gauge, and speaker construction, to the customization of electronic pickups, drum heads, microphones, and beyond, contemporary players have the ability to dial in exactly what they want or need to get their “dream tone.”

But, on the flip side, figuring out the differences between each of these options can become a major, and often times confusing, learning process. That’s the beauty of it, though—it takes time to age into a fine musician.

So, instead of trying to lay everything out on the proverbial table, the Sugg Street Post would like to bring you periodic information about the instruments area musicians use to get the sound you hear live or on their records. Enter: The Gear Guide.

For the first installment of The Gear Guide, we would like to bring you a closer look at Landon Miller’s coveted G&L custom ASAT-style bass (seen in photos).

A talented and dynamic player of over 15 years, Landon “The Original Groove Mechanic” Miller handles some serious low-end thump as the bassist for rock trio GypsyLifter, provides bass and guitar lessons to local up-and-comers, and even finds the time to contribute music and entertainment content to the Sugg Street Post.

So how does he get such a deep and fluid tone outside of his singular playing technique? Read on.

Custom Built G&L ASAT Bass - Tech Specs:
 
Pickups—Two G&L “Magnetic Field” humbuckers
Body Wood/Design—Swamp Ash with dual “voice chambers” and “f” hole 
Neck Wood—Hard rock maple with maple fretboard (abalone dot inlays)
Neck Shape—Narrow “C” shape
Tuners—Custom G&L “Ultra-Lite” machine heads with tapered aluminum string posts
Bridge—G&L “Saddle Lock” with chrome-plated brass saddles
Volume/Tone Controls—G&L “Tri-Tone” active/passive electronics, 3-way mini-toggle pickup selector, series/parallel mini-toggle, and preamp control mini-toggle (off/on/on with end EQ boost)
Finish—Belair green with white binding

The amplifier head Landon uses with his G&L—both live and while recording—is a David Eden WT500 model, which incorporates a tube preamp in conjunction with a solid-state power amp. A 410XLT 4X10 speaker cabinet projects the sound.

But how did Landon acquire the custom-made, four-string bass? And why did he choose the aforementioned specs?

As he explains, “The G&L ASAT bass is my prize possession. I ordered it custom from the company through ABBA Music in Henderson, KY. They were awesome, and they gave me the best deal I could find. It took three months to receive it since they actually had to build it for me. It was well worth the wait, though.”

“The tones I can conjure from this bass are amazing,” says Landon. “I can dial in a good passive Fender P-Bass or Jazz Bass tone, or I can go more modern and have a souped-up Musicman ‘Stingray’ tone. It's all I need.”

To check out more on Landon Miller and GypsyLifter—and music in general—check out the Sugg Street Post’s “The Lounge” section by clicking here. Want to find out more about bass and guitar lessons offered by Landon? If so, click here or call (270) 676-8182.

Want us to feature your favorite piece of gear? Contact us by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or through our official Facebook page.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos by Jeff Harp

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