Displaying items by tag: KY

West Kentucky Wild: Early Season Squirrels

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (8/28/13) – The 2013 squirrel season opened up on Saturday, August 17th. Rain had come sometime during the night and lightning flashes were receding in the distance. Daylight was still over an hour away, giving me a chance to stop in town, grab cup of hot coffee, and a sausage biscuit, while still having enough time to drive to the Muhlenberg County farm before daylight. The rain during the night, along with the calm winds, left ideal hunting conditions.

For reasons unknown, I decided to take my .22 rifle at the last minute, which is tough enough anyway, but especially so in the early part of the season with all the green leaves. To make matters worse, the 3 X 9 scope that is usually mounted on this rifle was moved to the .50 caliber, black powder muzzle loader last fall to help short up my aim for deer season. I suppose if I had really wanted a mess of squirrels, I would have taken a shotgun. Sometimes it’s just about the hunting part and the chance to get out in the woods. After all, it was a beautiful morning—even the mosquitoes and gnats weren’t too bad.

The hardwood ridges on the farm are filled with many varieties of trees that attract squirrels, including beeches, black gums, and oaks, but I knew it was the hickory trees that would give me the best chance. The tight barks, pignuts, and scaly barks are usually the first to hold concentrations in the early days. Later on, the oaks bearing acorns take over. With the abundance of nuts this year, it seemed all species of hickory were full.

The squirrels seemed to be scattered, too, with no one area better. While the rain drops falling from the still-wet leaves masked the sound of nut cuttings hitting the forest floor, there was still quite a racket when a squirrel jumped from one limb to another.

The final results were definitely in the squirrel's favor on this day. There will be other days—hopefully when some the green leaves have fallen. And you can bet a scope will be attached to the .22 rifle a on the next trip.

And don’t be fooled; Duck Dynasty's Robertson family isn't the only place fried squirrel can be found. There are still kitchens in this part of Kentucky where you can find platters of fried squirrel, along with milk gravy, fresh-sliced garden tomatoes, and hot biscuits. If you’re looking for a recipe for fried squirrel, I’d be willing to bet that your grandmother, or maybe even your mother, has one.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Nick Short

Read more...

West Kentucky Wild: Deer Hunter Support Sought for Charitable Food-Based Ministry

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (8/5/13)—Wanted: West Kentucky deer hunters’ support for the 2013-2014 "Want Not Waste Not" charitable food campaign.

With the 2013-2014 deer season rapidly approaching (archery season kicks it off on September 7th), local deer hunters’ attentions will be turning to preparation for the upcoming season. The excitement begins to build as the days get shorter, nights get a little cooler, and the leaves begin their changing process. Thoughts of harvesting that trophy buck dominate our dreams. Though the 2013 Kentucky Statewide deer tag allows a hunter to take two deer—one antlered and one antlerless—seldom is that second tag ever used. However, the “Want Not Waste Not" ministry hopes to change that.

Having heard somewhat about the program, I wanted to find out more. So this past Saturday, August 3rd, between weeding flower gardens and the PBS 7pm showing of "Elvis from Hawaii,” my better half and I headed to the Ballard Convention Center in Madisonville, KY for a sportsman's bash.

We browsed the many different vendors displaying their wares and services. I enjoyed eating a bagged taco from the Hope2All concession stand. I have to say, those ladies are really good salespeople.

We eventually cornered Chad Browning, founder of "Want Not Waste Not.” Chad was more than happy to talk about this program.

He explained how he and his wife, Tonita, were driving down one of the Peabody coal roads during the opening weekend of the 2011 season and came upon three abandoned camp sites that contained a total of seven complete deer carcasses. As an ethical hunter, this was very disturbing to Chad. To make matters worse, Hope2All community food bank was asking for people to donate any processed deer at the time. This was the birth of the "Want Not Waste Not" ministry God called upon the Brownings to create.

During the 2012 season alone, a total of 61 deer were donated. However, Chad anticipates collecting 150 or more this year.


“By partnering with Hope2All to distribute the processed deer, we can concentrate on collection and raising funds as it takes $60 for each deer processed,” said Chad. “The final product is ground venison mixed with beef fat in two pound bags.”

Want to donate a deer to this worthwhile cause? If so, read up on the following guidelines:

1. Your deer must be field dressed. If the current temperature is 50+ degrees, add a couple of bags of ice to the chest cavity if possible.

2. You must use your tag. Call the tele-check line at 1-800-245-4263 and get your confirmation number before you call.

3. Call Chad Browning at (270) 635-0544. Be prepared to give your name, phone number, area/location, and your confirmation number. Leave a message if necessary.

4. The WNWN ministry also offers deer donation pick up services that cover both Hopkins and Muhlenberg County. They also accept deer from other counties when possible. Call them at the number listed above and they can direct you to where to take it.

“We are currently working with three processors: Livingston Meats in Hopkinsville, KY; Barnes Processing in Beaver Dam, KY; and Yoder’s Custom Meats in Sebree, KY,” says Chad. “They will accept the deer without any issue. Just tell them it’s a donation for the ‘Want Not Waste Not’ program.”

Not a hunter, but still want to show your support of this charitable minsitry? Tax deductible donations are also accepted. In fact, a gift of $60.00 takes the deer from the forest to the dinner table of a local family in need.

Make all checks payable to the following address:

Hope2All
200 North Main Street
Nortonville, KY 42442

If you would like to volunteer your time or donate a deer, please call (270) 635-0544.

To learn more about the WNWN ministry or Hope2ALL, please visit this link: http://www.hope2all.com/. You can also find the WNWN ministry on Facebook by clicking here: https://www.facebook.com/WantNotWasteNot.

Additional photos from the outdoors festival held at the Ballard Convention Center in Madisonville, KY this past weekend are attached below.

________________________________________

A former Kentucky State BASS Federation Champ and longtime outdoorsman, Nick Short has spent over five decades learning the ins and outs of the hunting and fishing world. From coon-hunting as a youth, to hanging with fishing pros as an adult, Nick knows a thing or two about how it’s done outdoors. Want to know his secrets? Check out his latest installment of “West Kentucky Wild.”

To read other “West Kentucky Wild” installments, visit Nick’s Sugg Street Post blog page by clicking here: http://www.suggstreetpost.com/index.php/outdoors-west-kentucky-wild

Sugg Street Post
Written by Nick Short
Photos by Nick Short/Want Not Waste Not

Read more...
  • Published in Music

Glema Center Unveils Impressive 2013-14 Lineup, Tickets Available Online

MADISONVILLE, KY (6/24/13) - The Madisonville Community College Glema Mahr Center for the Arts announces its 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!” From the figurative “Ring of Fire” to the Kenya Safari Acrobats literally jumping through flame, this season promises to be sizzling! Headliners this season include the Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug), Gloria Gaynor, and Rick Springfield.

The other “HOT” news is that the Glema now has online ticketing! Patrons can purchase tickets from the comfort of home, by phone, or in person. Tickets go on sale to current package buyers July 8, new package buyers July 22, and single tickets go on sale July 29. The Everything Ticket is only $350 for 20 performances and saves $115 off of the single ticket cost. Please call (270) 821-2787 or visit http://www.glemacenter.org for more information on the Center’s offerings.

There is still one more show left in the 2012-13 Season! The Glema Center’s community theatre production of Rodgers’ & Hammerstein’s The King & I runs July 19-21!


Glema Mahr Center for the Arts 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!”


Center Stage Series

The Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug)
Friday, September 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $45/$40

What began as a group of studio musicians getting together just for fun quickly evolved into The Time Jumpers becoming Nashville legends! The group earned a loyal following for their lively take on classic Western swing and old-school country music.
Sponsored by Old National Bank

Ring of Fire: The Life & Music of Johnny Cash
Friday, September 27, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $26/$21
Touching on the life and times of one of the world’s most legendary musical artists, Johnny Cash, the musical revue “Ring of Fire” is considered one of the best “jukebox musicals” of our time. Although Cash himself is never impersonated, Ring of Fire features a company of performers that will guide you on a journey through Cash’s storied life and celebrated music. With smashing medleys and bounce in its guitar-driven energy, this show will have you stompin’ your feet and asking for more! (Sponsored by Hudson Automotive)

Sarah Council Dance Projects-Featuring music performed by Carla Gover & Anna Gevalt-Roberts
Saturday, November 16, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 general admission
Sarah Council Dance Projects is a project-based dance company founded in 2007 by choreographer Sarah Council as a platform to create emotionally and physically honest dance performance works. These dances explore and reflect life’s poignant moments, from the beautiful to the tragic, and the curious to the absurd. (Sponsored by Juanita Badgett Performing Arts Endowment; Residency Support by the Estates of Ruth and Sue Anne Salmon. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council)

Gloria Gaynor-Christmas with the Queen of Disco
Friday, December 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $40/$35

“I Will Survive” climbed to the top of Billboard’s Pop Charts in 1979, claiming the #1 position on two different occasions. Little did Gloria Gaynor know at the time, the song would eventually become a rallying cry for social survival and remain as relevant today as it was three decades ago. The inspiring single is just the tip of the iceberg where this talented performer’s repertoire is concerned. (Sponsored by Hopkins County Tourist & Convention Commission; Additional Support Provided by the Enduring Legacy of Mrs. Glema Mahr)

H.M.S. Pinafore Presented by New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, Albert Bergeret, Artistic Director
Thursday, March 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $28/$24 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Now. Sea. Here. Ride a wave of music and laughter as romantic sailors, sisters, cousins, and aunts sing and dance their way across the deck of the fanciful British naval vessel with the improbable name. If you liked NYGASP’s productions of “The Mikado” and “Pirates of Penzance”, you’ll love the humor and beautiful music of Gilbert & Sullivan’s first masterpiece! (Sponsored by Anne P. Baker Endowment for Sustained Excellence in the Arts)

Rick Springfield
Friday, April 11, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $50/$45

For all of his accomplishments as an actor, best-selling author and documentary subject, Rick Springfield has always insisted his first love is music. With 25 million albums sold and 17 Top 40 hits, including the 1981 #1 hit “Jessie’s Girl”, (which earned him a Grammy for Best Male Rock Vocal), it is evident music is indeed his great love. (Sponsored by Baptist Health Madisonville)

US Bank Family Specials

A Children’s Nutcracker Presented by Children’s Center for Dance Education
Tuesday, December 10, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $16/$12 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Tchaikovsky’s famous ballet is performed by children for children. Children’s Center for Dance Education and local dancers celebrate this timeless classic. Auditions for local children will be held Sunday, September 29, 2013 at 2 p.m.

Kenya Safari Acrobats
Friday, April 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $18/$14 (Children 12 & under half-price)

The Kenya Safari Acrobats offer a truly unique cultural experience. They perform a non-stop ride of gravity-defying human pyramids, balancing, tumbling, limbo dancing, hurling through hoops and breathtaking contortions, all while clapping to a joyful Benga beat. Combining artistry with humor and playfulness, these gymnasts are a huge crowd pleaser!

Glema Mahr Chamber Music Series

Sonya Baker-Soprano
Thursday, October 3, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Sonya Gabrielle Baker, noted for her performances of American classical vocal music, has been heard in concert both nationally and internationally, from appearances in Carnegie Hall to the Kremlin.

Sarah E. Geller-Violin
Saturday, November 23, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Described as “a consummate artist performing with convincing vigor and passion,” violinist Sarah E. Geller has performed to critical acclaim coast to coast.

Sara Sant’Ambrogio-Cello
Thursday, February 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Grammy Award-winning cellist Sara Sant’Ambrogio has performed throughout the world at major music centers and festivals and is a founding member of the Eroica Trio.

Pavel Kolesnikov-Piano, 2012 Honens Prize Laureate
Thursday, April 3, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

The Telegraph (London) describes 2012 Honens Prize Laureate pianist Pavel Kolesnikov’s playing as having “brilliance, but also a caressing, almost sly intimacy.”

Hancock Bank & Trust Coffeehouse Series

Robin & Linda Williams-Americana
Tuesday, October 15, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

For more than three decades now, These “Prairie Home Companion” regulars have made it their mission to perform the music that they love, “a robust blend of bluegrass, folk, old-time and acoustic country that combines wryly observant lyrics with a wide-ranging melodicism.”

Jane L. Powell-Goddess of Soul
Friday, November 8, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

“A certain talent comes along every 20 years or so, and Jane is it.” Tony Bennett
Ms. Powell quickly captivates any audience with her musical flexibility, open and playful personality, and spicy, spontaneous sense of humor.

Tiempo Libre-Latin Jazz
Saturday, February 1, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

This three-time Grammy-nominated Cuban music group is one of the hottest young bands today. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council.

Ben Sollee-Genre-bending Cello & Vocals
Saturday, March 22, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Known for his thrilling cello playing that incorporates new techniques to create a unique mix of folk, bluegrass, jazz and R&B, Ben Sollee possesses rough, smooth, smoky vocal stylings and a knack for intricate arrangements.

First United Bank and Trust Proud Partnerships

Hairspray! presented by Hopkins County Central High School Fine Arts Department
Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Book by Mark O’Donnell & Thomas Meehan, Music & Lyrics by Marc Shaiman, Lyrics by Scott Wittman
Can a larger-than-life adolescent manage to vanquish the local TV dance program’s reigning princess, integrate the television show, and find true love (singing and dancing all the while, of course!) without mussing her hair? Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Willy Wonka presented by Madisonville North Hopkins High School Music Department
Friday, March 14, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, March 15, 2014 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Music and Lyrics by Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley, Adapted for the Stage by Timothy Allen McDonald & Leslie Bricusse
Roald Dahl’s timeless story of the world-famous candy man and his quest to find an heir comes to life in this stage adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which features the songs from the classic family film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Community Theatre
(Permanent support for Community Theatre provided by J.B. & Kiel Moore Community Programs Endowment)

I’m Not Rappaport by Herb Gardner-Dinner Theatre
February 20-22, 2014 ∙ 6:30 p.m.
Tickets: (includes dinner) $22

This Tony award-winning play takes a humorous, yet poignant look at dreams and the realities of aging through the eyes of two octogenarians. Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. (Sponsored by Dick & Phyllis Frymire and Ralph & Sue Mitchell)

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
July 18 & 19, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ July 20, 2014 ∙ 2 p.m.
Tickets: $16 (general admission)

Music & lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Book by Hugh Wheeler
A rare instance of a musical thriller, the Glema proudly presents Stephen Sondheim’s chilling, suspenseful, heart-pounding masterpiece of murderous “barberism” and culinary crime. The sophisticated and breath-taking music mixes with visceral drama and deliciously funny moments of dark humor. You’ll find yourself laughing hysterically before gasping in surprise. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International. Recommended for ages 14 and up due to violence and mature themes. (Sponsored by Don & Mary Susan Fishman)

Special Events

Back 2 School Bash
Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 4–10 p.m.
Free Admission (Bring your lawn chairs)

Join us for this annual celebration of local talent featuring Guitar Center’s 2012 Battle of the Blues winner, Boscoe France, as this year’s Headliner.
(Sponsored by the Miner Family Arts Endowment)

A Community Christmas-MCC Singers & Local Ensembles
Friday, December 6, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Join us for this annual tradition as local choral groups team up with community-based instrumental ensembles to ring in the Season.
(Sponsored by United Southern Bank Additional support provided by Mrs. Betty Trover, Allen & Pam Rudd, Barry & Gail Eveland, Dr. & Mrs. J.L. Hamman, & Dr. Judith L. Rhoads)

Kristen Iverson-Author of Full Body Burden
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Kristen Iversen is the author of Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats, a finalist for the Barnes & Noble Discover Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence. Ms. Iverson holds a Ph.D from the University of Denver and is an associate professor at the University of Memphis, where she directs the MFA program in creative writing. Full Body Burden has been chosen as MCC’s “Common Reader” for the 2013-14 academic year.

The Anne P. Baker Gallery

August 17-October 4, 2013
Glema Center Juried Art Exhibit & Glema Center Juried Photography Exhibit
Reception & Awards, Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 2 p.m.

Permanent support for gallery exhibits provided by the Robbie P. Ruby Memorial Endowment.

Information about exhibits throughout the year, as well as any of the events mentioned above, are available at www.glemacenter.org

Sugg Street Post
Information/lineup provided by the Glema Mahr Center for the Arts via Brad Downall

Read more...
  • Published in Art

Glema Center Unveils Impressive 2013-14 Lineup, Tickets Available Online

MADISONVILLE, KY (6/24/13) - The Madisonville Community College Glema Mahr Center for the Arts announces its 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!” From the figurative “Ring of Fire” to the Kenya Safari Acrobats literally jumping through flame, this season promises to be sizzling! Headliners this season include the Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug), Gloria Gaynor, and Rick Springfield.

The other “HOT” news is that the Glema now has online ticketing! Patrons can purchase tickets from the comfort of home, by phone, or in person. Tickets go on sale to current package buyers July 8, new package buyers July 22, and single tickets go on sale July 29. The Everything Ticket is only $350 for 20 performances and saves $115 off of the single ticket cost. Please call (270) 821-2787 or visit http://www.glemacenter.org for more information on the Center’s offerings.

There is still one more show left in the 2012-13 Season! The Glema Center’s community theatre production of Rodgers’ & Hammerstein’s The King & I runs July 19-21!


Glema Mahr Center for the Arts 2013-14 Season: “Arts on Fire!”


Center Stage Series

The Time Jumpers (featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug)
Friday, September 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $45/$40

What began as a group of studio musicians getting together just for fun quickly evolved into The Time Jumpers becoming Nashville legends! The group earned a loyal following for their lively take on classic Western swing and old-school country music.
Sponsored by Old National Bank

Ring of Fire: The Life & Music of Johnny Cash
Friday, September 27, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $26/$21
Touching on the life and times of one of the world’s most legendary musical artists, Johnny Cash, the musical revue “Ring of Fire” is considered one of the best “jukebox musicals” of our time. Although Cash himself is never impersonated, Ring of Fire features a company of performers that will guide you on a journey through Cash’s storied life and celebrated music. With smashing medleys and bounce in its guitar-driven energy, this show will have you stompin’ your feet and asking for more! (Sponsored by Hudson Automotive)

Sarah Council Dance Projects-Featuring music performed by Carla Gover & Anna Gevalt-Roberts
Saturday, November 16, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 general admission
Sarah Council Dance Projects is a project-based dance company founded in 2007 by choreographer Sarah Council as a platform to create emotionally and physically honest dance performance works. These dances explore and reflect life’s poignant moments, from the beautiful to the tragic, and the curious to the absurd. (Sponsored by Juanita Badgett Performing Arts Endowment; Residency Support by the Estates of Ruth and Sue Anne Salmon. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council)

Gloria Gaynor-Christmas with the Queen of Disco
Friday, December 13, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $40/$35

“I Will Survive” climbed to the top of Billboard’s Pop Charts in 1979, claiming the #1 position on two different occasions. Little did Gloria Gaynor know at the time, the song would eventually become a rallying cry for social survival and remain as relevant today as it was three decades ago. The inspiring single is just the tip of the iceberg where this talented performer’s repertoire is concerned. (Sponsored by Hopkins County Tourist & Convention Commission; Additional Support Provided by the Enduring Legacy of Mrs. Glema Mahr)

H.M.S. Pinafore Presented by New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, Albert Bergeret, Artistic Director
Thursday, March 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $28/$24 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Now. Sea. Here. Ride a wave of music and laughter as romantic sailors, sisters, cousins, and aunts sing and dance their way across the deck of the fanciful British naval vessel with the improbable name. If you liked NYGASP’s productions of “The Mikado” and “Pirates of Penzance”, you’ll love the humor and beautiful music of Gilbert & Sullivan’s first masterpiece! (Sponsored by Anne P. Baker Endowment for Sustained Excellence in the Arts)

Rick Springfield
Friday, April 11, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $50/$45

For all of his accomplishments as an actor, best-selling author and documentary subject, Rick Springfield has always insisted his first love is music. With 25 million albums sold and 17 Top 40 hits, including the 1981 #1 hit “Jessie’s Girl”, (which earned him a Grammy for Best Male Rock Vocal), it is evident music is indeed his great love. (Sponsored by Baptist Health Madisonville)

US Bank Family Specials

A Children’s Nutcracker Presented by Children’s Center for Dance Education
Tuesday, December 10, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $16/$12 (Children 12 & under half-price)

Tchaikovsky’s famous ballet is performed by children for children. Children’s Center for Dance Education and local dancers celebrate this timeless classic. Auditions for local children will be held Sunday, September 29, 2013 at 2 p.m.

Kenya Safari Acrobats
Friday, April 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Tickets: $18/$14 (Children 12 & under half-price)

The Kenya Safari Acrobats offer a truly unique cultural experience. They perform a non-stop ride of gravity-defying human pyramids, balancing, tumbling, limbo dancing, hurling through hoops and breathtaking contortions, all while clapping to a joyful Benga beat. Combining artistry with humor and playfulness, these gymnasts are a huge crowd pleaser!

Glema Mahr Chamber Music Series

Sonya Baker-Soprano
Thursday, October 3, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Sonya Gabrielle Baker, noted for her performances of American classical vocal music, has been heard in concert both nationally and internationally, from appearances in Carnegie Hall to the Kremlin.

Sarah E. Geller-Violin
Saturday, November 23, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Described as “a consummate artist performing with convincing vigor and passion,” violinist Sarah E. Geller has performed to critical acclaim coast to coast.

Sara Sant’Ambrogio-Cello
Thursday, February 27, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Grammy Award-winning cellist Sara Sant’Ambrogio has performed throughout the world at major music centers and festivals and is a founding member of the Eroica Trio.

Pavel Kolesnikov-Piano, 2012 Honens Prize Laureate
Thursday, April 3, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

The Telegraph (London) describes 2012 Honens Prize Laureate pianist Pavel Kolesnikov’s playing as having “brilliance, but also a caressing, almost sly intimacy.”

Hancock Bank & Trust Coffeehouse Series

Robin & Linda Williams-Americana
Tuesday, October 15, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

For more than three decades now, These “Prairie Home Companion” regulars have made it their mission to perform the music that they love, “a robust blend of bluegrass, folk, old-time and acoustic country that combines wryly observant lyrics with a wide-ranging melodicism.”

Jane L. Powell-Goddess of Soul
Friday, November 8, 2013 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

“A certain talent comes along every 20 years or so, and Jane is it.” Tony Bennett
Ms. Powell quickly captivates any audience with her musical flexibility, open and playful personality, and spicy, spontaneous sense of humor.

Tiempo Libre-Latin Jazz
Saturday, February 1, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

This three-time Grammy-nominated Cuban music group is one of the hottest young bands today. This performance and residency activities are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Arts Council.

Ben Sollee-Genre-bending Cello & Vocals
Saturday, March 22, 2014 ∙ 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20 (general admission)

Known for his thrilling cello playing that incorporates new techniques to create a unique mix of folk, bluegrass, jazz and R&B, Ben Sollee possesses rough, smooth, smoky vocal stylings and a knack for intricate arrangements.

First United Bank and Trust Proud Partnerships

Hairspray! presented by Hopkins County Central High School Fine Arts Department
Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Book by Mark O’Donnell & Thomas Meehan, Music & Lyrics by Marc Shaiman, Lyrics by Scott Wittman
Can a larger-than-life adolescent manage to vanquish the local TV dance program’s reigning princess, integrate the television show, and find true love (singing and dancing all the while, of course!) without mussing her hair? Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Willy Wonka presented by Madisonville North Hopkins High School Music Department
Friday, March 14, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ Saturday, March 15, 2014 ∙ 2 & 7 p.m.
Tickets: $12 (All students half-price)
Music and Lyrics by Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley, Adapted for the Stage by Timothy Allen McDonald & Leslie Bricusse
Roald Dahl’s timeless story of the world-famous candy man and his quest to find an heir comes to life in this stage adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which features the songs from the classic family film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

Community Theatre
(Permanent support for Community Theatre provided by J.B. & Kiel Moore Community Programs Endowment)

I’m Not Rappaport by Herb Gardner-Dinner Theatre
February 20-22, 2014 ∙ 6:30 p.m.
Tickets: (includes dinner) $22

This Tony award-winning play takes a humorous, yet poignant look at dreams and the realities of aging through the eyes of two octogenarians. Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. (Sponsored by Dick & Phyllis Frymire and Ralph & Sue Mitchell)

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
July 18 & 19, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m. ∙ July 20, 2014 ∙ 2 p.m.
Tickets: $16 (general admission)

Music & lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Book by Hugh Wheeler
A rare instance of a musical thriller, the Glema proudly presents Stephen Sondheim’s chilling, suspenseful, heart-pounding masterpiece of murderous “barberism” and culinary crime. The sophisticated and breath-taking music mixes with visceral drama and deliciously funny moments of dark humor. You’ll find yourself laughing hysterically before gasping in surprise. Produced by arrangement with Music Theatre International. Recommended for ages 14 and up due to violence and mature themes. (Sponsored by Don & Mary Susan Fishman)

Special Events

Back 2 School Bash
Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 4–10 p.m.
Free Admission (Bring your lawn chairs)

Join us for this annual celebration of local talent featuring Guitar Center’s 2012 Battle of the Blues winner, Boscoe France, as this year’s Headliner.
(Sponsored by the Miner Family Arts Endowment)

A Community Christmas-MCC Singers & Local Ensembles
Friday, December 6, 2013 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Join us for this annual tradition as local choral groups team up with community-based instrumental ensembles to ring in the Season.
(Sponsored by United Southern Bank Additional support provided by Mrs. Betty Trover, Allen & Pam Rudd, Barry & Gail Eveland, Dr. & Mrs. J.L. Hamman, & Dr. Judith L. Rhoads)

Kristen Iverson-Author of Full Body Burden
Tuesday, March 25, 2014 ∙ 7 p.m.
Free Admission

Kristen Iversen is the author of Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats, a finalist for the Barnes & Noble Discover Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence. Ms. Iverson holds a Ph.D from the University of Denver and is an associate professor at the University of Memphis, where she directs the MFA program in creative writing. Full Body Burden has been chosen as MCC’s “Common Reader” for the 2013-14 academic year.

The Anne P. Baker Gallery

August 17-October 4, 2013
Glema Center Juried Art Exhibit & Glema Center Juried Photography Exhibit
Reception & Awards, Saturday, August 17, 2013 ∙ 2 p.m.

Permanent support for gallery exhibits provided by the Robbie P. Ruby Memorial Endowment.

Information about exhibits throughout the year, as well as any of the events mentioned above, are available at www.glemacenter.org

Sugg Street Post
Information/lineup provided by the Glema Mahr Center for the Arts via Brad Downall

Read more...
  • Published in Music

Harper Guitars: One-of-a-Kind Music in the Making

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (6/13/13)—Good music, like artwork, transcends the boundaries of time. Be it Bach or the Beatles, there’s no denying the virtually indefinable sense of universality and timelessness that flows through a powerful song or performance. It’s, in a word, electric. And while the innate “magic” of a truly talented artist, as well as their approach and technique, may ultimately define the sounds they create, it’s easy to wonder if the enduring music we enjoy on a daily basis would have ever became a reality without the aid of a skilled craftsman’s vision: an instrument.

While modernity yields an exceedingly accessible music market flooded with affordable, yet oftentimes machine-made and outsourced instruments—many of which are actually well-made, high-end productions—the mystique of an instrument constructed and customized by the hands of a true artisan remains unmistakable. In fact, it’s the touch of man that has become a sought-after commodity in an instrument-making age full of exact replicas and “perfect” tolerances.

Need evidence? Simply take a look at the current value of many vintage guitars. Though today’s vintage guitar market has shared in the nation’s overall economic downturn, a well-preserved 1959 Gibson Les Paul may still fetch well over half-a-million dollars in an auction-type setting. Why, you ask? To sum it up generally, it was produced at the pinnacle of an era that valued close attention to details and fine, hands-on craftsmanship.

Fortunately, however, there are still craftsmen out there practicing an old-world approach to the process with striking results. One of these artisans is Jacob Harper of Harper (JIH) Guitars.

A native of western Kentucky and a current resident of Boonville, IN, Jacob Harper displays a proficiency for producing some of the most beautiful, playable, and uniquely custom guitars in the region and, as some would argue, possibly the country. From his remarkable, signature solid body and hollow body designs, to his rather unorthodox creations like the “Hellhound” double-neck guitar/bass, Jacob’s particularly functional pieces of creative art work are known for instigating a drop or two of drool from the mouths of regional musicians. What’s more, accomplished performers like west Kentucky bluesman and thumbpicker extraordinaire, Alonzo Pennington, as well as Uncle Kracker’s touring guitarist, Kevin McCreery, have turned to Harper Guitars for their custom instrument needs both in the past and present.

Yet, for all the praise and trial-and-error know-how Jacob has accrued since he first started building guitars in 2007, he remains a humble, down-to-earth musician, architect, and family man that simply enjoys his time spent in the workshop.

In looking at his early inspirations, though, it’s really not that much of a surprise that he’s such an unassuming, albeit talented, human being.

In addition to a love for playing and listening to a diversity of musical styles, Jacob’s family has always been involved with architecture or construction in some manner. In fact, his childhood home in Cadiz, KY—a log cabin style residence—was constructed entirely by the sweat of his father and uncles’ brows. Undoubtedly, it was this continuous exposure to design and architecture that would eventually lead Jacob down a fulfilling path of architectural education and employment that bleeds into his custom guitar work today. Viewing these facts from an outside perspective, it seems that Jacob was simply destined to effectively combine the two facets—music and architectural design—at some point.

But how did he learn the "ins and outs" of being a luthier? What’s the actual process of making a guitar like? What keeps him inspired to create such intensive works of functional art? And what does Jacob have in mind for Harper Guitars in the future?

To find out the answers to these questions and more, myself, as well as Sugg Street Post writer Jessica Dockrey and photographer Jessi Smith, recently paid a visit to Jacob inside his two-level workshop and studio space in Boonville. The results of the intriguing encounter are as follows.

Luke Short: Tell me a little bit about yourself. How old are you and where are you originally from?

Jacob Harper: I’m 37, I believe. [laughs] I was born in Cadiz, KY. I was raised there and that’s where I grew up.

LS: What was your childhood like there? What were you into as a kid?

JH: We all grew up on, well, it wasn’t really farm, but it was a good-sized piece of land down by Lake Barkley. There wasn’t much to do other than to create your own fun. It was basically like you’d leave in the morning and wouldn’t come back until night. We’d just be out running around all day. It was a lot of fun.

LS: Is your family originally from this area?

JH: No. My grandmother is actually from India. She’s British. My granddad was from the states. He was in the Navy when he met my grandmother. Then they settled down outside of Christian County and they ended up moving to Rockcastle, which is near Eddyville, KY.

LS: Did you make it through school alright?

JH: I made it the whole way through Trigg County High School [in Cadiz, KY] and then I went to Murray State University for five years.

LS: What did you study at Murray?

JH: I studied Industrial Technology Design, which is focused on drafting, design, and architecture. My dad is a contractor, and when I was a kid, he was always building houses. I helped build them, became interested in that process, and I started drawing plans for him when I was 17. I just decided to do that in school and I’ve worked for architectural firms and civil engineers even since.

LS: What are some of the places you’ve worked for?

JH: Right out of school, I worked for a civil engineer based out of Benton, KY. From there, I went to work for Murray State in their Capital Construction Program. After that, I went to work for a place based out of Lexington, KY. We all worked in a satellite office in Paducah. I did that for probably five or six years. I moved there for that job. I met Andrea, my wife, during that time. She worked at Enterprise [Rent-A-Car]. Well, she ended up getting a promotion to the position of district manager in this area [Boonville, IN], so I said, “OK, you’re making more money than me, so I’m moving with you.” [laughs] We moved up here and she wasn’t happy with Enterprise, so she went to work for Alcon Pharmaceutical Sales. As for me, I work for Hafer Associates here in Boonville. They’re an architecture firm. I’m a project manager there.

LS: That sounds like a higher-level job.

JH: It can get pretty hectic trying to find personal time. It’s an eight-to-five job, but I often find myself working overtime. Plus, it’s pretty intense work, but I find time to be a dad and eat supper. I’m usually out here in the workshop most nights. I wake up extra early in the morning to come out here, too.

LS: At what point in your life did you get into music?

JH: I’ve always been into music. My mom’s a country singer and my grandmother was a piano player. She played in church for years. My dad has eight brothers and only two or three of them don’t play music. Some of them are professional studio musicians and others are weekend warriors, so I was always around that. They were always playing music, so it was just a part of my life even at a young age.

LS: Was there a point where you really started gravitating toward a certain genre and developed your own musical identity, so to speak?

JH: It’s kind of weird. I was always turned off by country music growing up, because my mom was a country singer. I guess I just thought it wasn’t “cool enough,” you know? It’s like you’re trained to be that way. On the flip side, the people who really started buying my guitars were country musicians. As I got older, I didn’t mind listening to country, and I actually appreciate pickers like [Brad] Paisley and [Ricky] Skaggs and all those other guys. But when I was younger and in high school, I dropped out of band because it wasn’t “cool.” I started playing in a rock band instead. We played heavy metal and rock, and it was a blast. I was probably way too young to be playing in bars, though. [laughs] That’s what I went more towards, as well as blues. The blues were what a lot of my uncles played.

Jessica Dockrey: What instrument did you play in band?

JH: I actually played saxophone.

LS: I played saxophone in band, too, but I was like you and quit because I didn’t think it was “cool enough” for me.

JH: There’s a low retention of saxophone players out there I guess. [laughs]

LS: I really kick myself sometimes now, though. If I could still play sax, I’d be doing Pink Floyd covers all day.

JH: [laughs] I still want to go get a sax every once in a while.

LS: I took piano lessons, too. I took them for about three years and then did the same thing—I quit because it wasn’t “cool”—and now I kick myself for that, too.

JH: As my son grows up, he will learn to play piano, because that’s the gateway to all other instruments. [laughs] I kick myself, too, because my grandmother had free lessons waiting for me if I wanted them, and she was an amazing piano player. I tried it out for maybe six months and just gave it up. That was so stupid of me. [laughs]

LS: So, at what point did you really get into playing guitar?

JH: I was probably 15-years-old and my dad had an acoustic, all my uncles played music, and I’d see and hear them playing all the time, so I wanted to do that too. So, I got my dad’s acoustic and I went through an entire guitar lesson book in about three days. It came pretty easy to me, but it hurt [my fingers]. You’ve learned guitar too, so you know what I’m talking about. I would play for six hours every day. I would just play, play, and play. That’s how I got into it.

LS: When did you say to yourself, “Hey, I’m going to build a guitar”?

JH: I was in Paducah in 2004 or so, and I just had an itch to build some furniture. I maxed out credit cards and bought a lot of tools during the process. I wasn’t married yet, so it was easy to do that. Building furniture was fun for a while. I had a friend there that I played music with at the time, and he was also a woodshop student from Murray State who was working for a guitar builder out of Mayfield [Kentucky]. I went over there with him and watched what he was doing one time, and the guitars the guy was making were amazing. I believe the guy’s name was Brad Smith. Afterwards, I said to myself, “I’ve got the tools to do that, and I’ve been playing for 20 years, so maybe I should try it out.” That’s how it all got started. It was kind of rough in the beginning, though. [laughs] I didn’t go to luthier school, so I had to make all my own mistakes. I’ve probably learned a lot more making those mistakes, though.

LS: On that subject, tell me a little bit about the first guitar you ever made, which, as I believe, was a Gibson Les Paul-style solid body.

JH: With basically any guitar, the math is the same, which is something that I should have paid more attention to when I first started. I should’ve looked at the details closer. That’s what I’ve learned: it’s all about the details and precision. You know, you measure things a hundred times and cut once. My first guitar was really rough; it felt like a baseball bat. [laughs] It was far too heavy.

LS: To you, what is the hardest or most frustrating part of building a guitar?

JH: Setting up the fretboard and getting the frets right is the hardest part, because there are so many things that you have to make just right all at once. A lot of companies have machines that they throw the guitar in and they bend the neck and shave things off, but I still do all of that by hand, and I’m sure other guitar builders still do it by hand, too. But that’s definitely the hardest part; that’s where you really have to slow down and take your time.

LS: Is that mainly because of the spacing between frets, fret height, fretboard radius, etcetera?

JH: I could start to tell you, but there are so many little critical dimensions to consider—the curve of the neck, the angle of the neck to the body, and on and on.

LS: What’s the story behind your workshop? When did you move to Boonville, IN and when did you get all your equipment set up?

JH: Well, we’ve been here six years now. When we moved up to Evansville, I had already been building guitars. I think that “number eight”—that hollow-body over there [points to a black guitar in the studio area]—was probably the last one done during the transition. We moved up to Evansville, I lived with my brother for a while, then we lived in an apartment, and I would travel back home to my dad’s place on the weekends and work in his barn. I had to relocate my entire shop from Paducah to my dad’s barn so I could keep on building. Then we moved up here [to Boonville, IN] and lived in an apartment for a little while, but it wasn’t long before we said, “This is ridiculous. We’ve lived in and owned a house before.” I hated living in an apartment. So we started looking for places, and I think this [the Harper’s current home] was the first place I went and looked at. I like it because of all the potential it had for housing a proper shop in the garage area. It’s a really old house. It was built in the 1800s and it has some issues. I love fixing stuff up, though, but it takes me away from building guitars.

LS: Is woodworking something that you’ve always had an interest in or was it something that just developed out of the blue?

JH: Well, my mom’s dad was a fine woodworker. He built furniture. My grandfather on my dad’s side was a machinist in the military, and he was kind of a “fix anything” type of handyman. Then, my dad’s brothers, as well as my dad, were all woodworkers, contractors, fine furniture builders, and finish carpenters. My dad and all his brothers actually built the log cabin we all grew up in. It was just always something I was around. With what I’m doing now, I already knew how to use the tools, so it was simply getting them.

LS: The tools are definitely expensive. So, tell me a little bit about the layout of the shop?

JH: To put it simply, it’s one part dirty and one part clean. You kind of have to keep the two parts separated. The downstairs portion is the woodshop. I do all the work I can in there up to the point of finishing, and then I bring it upstairs to actually apply the finish. I’m using all the space I can downstairs. I can’t buy anymore tools, because I don’t have room for them unless my wife decides to let me use the garage part. Maybe this interview will help with that. [laughs] As far as a layout goes, though, I’m always working on how things are set up. I’ve amassed so many tools, and they’re all specialty tools, so figuring out places for all of those where I can actually find them when I need them has been fun. I play music and I wanted a practice space, so I built this studio and an isolation booth up here on the second floor. Well, a paint booth was a necessity, so I eventually made the isolation booth my paint booth.

LS: I know there are a variety of tools used to create a guitar by hand, but what are some of the main tools that you use during the process and what is their function?

JH: Oh, that’s a hard one. [laughs] They’re all equally important. You know, there’s a lot of roughing out—because I get rough pieces of wood from sawmills, some of which still have bark on them believe it or not—and you’ve got all your heavy machinery like the table saw and the band saw that help to take the original piece from a rough form to a dimensional piece of lumber. Then, you go into all the carving stuff—hand carving tools, planes, and spokeshaves, all the way down to needle files and beyond. I mean, the whole finishing process is intense. I could seriously spend an entire day telling you all the things I’ve learned about finishing.

LS: You mentioned that you get some of your wood from local sawmills. Is that where you get all of your lumber?

JH: There’s a mill north of here. I get a lot of my ‘big stock’ stuff from there, like mahogany and maple. I usually find all my really highly figured stuff on eBay. I find it one piece at a time that way. I have to see detailed pictures of it before I buy it, though. I’ve paid $350 for a relatively smaller, highly figured piece of wood before.

LS: Did you acquire all your equipment at once or did you acquire it over time?

JH: It’s been a process of maxing out credit cards to get my bigger stuff in the beginning. Then I got married and we agreed that I needed to stop doing that. [laughs] But, at the very least, it’s set me up. I always argue that it’s an investment, which rarely works with her. [laughs] Since I started selling guitars, I haven’t made any profit. It all goes back into tools. At times, when I need something like a new jig or something like that, I’ll just make one myself instead of going out and buying one for $400 right off the bat. Then, I’ll buy a new one when I can, when I have the money. Right now, though, I’ve been able to cover most of my costs from selling guitars and we’re all happy.

LS: As far as smaller stuff goes, do you turn to places like Stewart-MacDonald?

JH: Yeah, Stewart-MacDonald is a big company for me right now. If I ever stepped up production, I’d really have to look at that, though. Stewart-MacDonald is great, but it’s a little expensive.

LS: What are the most common types of woods that you use? Also, what are some of the more exotic woods you’ve used?

JH: Maple and mahogany. Those are the most common. I’ve also used Korina, sapele, Honduran mahogany, African mahogany, highly figured maple, plain maple, rock maple, sugar maple, soft maple, purpleheart, ebonies, zebra woods, rosewood, and some others. I’m not big enough yet for them to bring the Lacey Act down on me, though. I’m not traveling to South America to get my lumber or anything if that’s what you’re getting at. [laughs]

LS: What happened with the Lacey Act and the Gibson Guitar Company is insane. It’s interesting that they were the only company to come under fire, because every other big guitar manufacturer—as far as I understand it at least—was using and importing the exact same woods.

JH: What kills me is that Gibson is probably a steward of forestry in those countries where the forests are pretty much raped on a daily basis. Gibson comes in and says, “No, we want to have wood to use in the future. Let us show you how to do this the right way.” Still, though, they came after them. I think it was all political. I guess everyone at Gibson was republican or something. [laughs]

LS: You mentioned that getting the frets correct is one of the hardest or most frustrating parts of building one of your guitars. What’s the easiest or most enjoyable thing about a build to you?

JH: I really enjoy the carving process, especially when I make hollow body and carved top guitars. I still do all of that by hand. I use the “old school” method where I’ll just lay out a kind of topography with the wood and sit there and work that down with a router. Then I’ll get a handplane and knock off all the edges, and I’ll handplane everything else down smooth. That part is tedious and your hands have blisters all over them at the end, but it pays off when you get some finish on it or see someone playing it on stage.

Jessica Dockrey: That makes me think of Alonzo Pennington’s guitar, “Goldie." That guitar is so beautiful. I love it.

JH: Yeah, that one came about when I had a little extra money and I was in between builds. When that happens, I just build my own guitar out-of-pocket. With the one Alonzo now has, I was actually sitting out here one night thinking to myself, “If I’m going to build a guitar, what am I going to do with it?” Well, I got to looking at my goldtop Gibson Les Paul in the studio, and I thought, “I’m going to see if I can beat Les Paul.” [laughs] Evidently, Alonzo thinks it does.

LS: I would have to agree with that, too. A handmade guitar that is well-build will beat a mass-produced instrument—like a Les Paul for example—the majority of the time.

JH: You know, there’s a really fine line that you have to cross. You can have a really, really expensive piece of trash. I definitely know what I’m doing, but I don’t always know everything about the wood I get from mills. I don’t know how much they’ve dried it and I don’t have the big, costly equipment you need to test a piece of wood’s moisture content. Keeping that in mind, I try to buy wood well in advance of a build so it can acclimate. If I worked with fiberglass or graphite, it might be easier, but that’s not what I want to do.

LS: A lot of people that aren’t that into the technical aspect of guitars don’t realize how much changes in temperature and humidity can severely alter, or even permanently damage, tonewoods. You really have to take care of a good instrument for it to retain its value and tone.

JH: When you tell a guitar store that you’re having problems with the neck or fretboard, they sometimes heat the neck until it pops off. If you leave a guitar in a car, it can do the same thing. It’s like putting your guitar in an oven basically.

LS: How many guitars have you made since you started building in 2007?

JH: I’m on my 35th guitar right now. I’ve built more and more each year. I’ve probably made four this year so far.

LS: How long does an “average” build typically take to complete?

JH: My standard solid body flattop guitars usually take around two months to make. If I get more weekends at home, it may take a week less. The killer part about guitars is that you get everything to the finishing stage, you put the finish on, and you have to wait. Then you put more finish on and you have to wait more.

LS: Is that just part of the drying process when you use nitrocellulose?

JH: Yeah. In about a week-and-a-half, I can have a guitar ready for finishes, but then it takes a month or a month-and-a-half for the finish to cure.

LS: Wow, I had no idea that it took that long.

JH: A lot of the bigger companies use different finishes. For example, PRS [Paul Reed Smith Guitars] use acrylic-based urethanes that dry super quick and become really stable. They look really good and they probably have their own mixture, but all the “gear heads” love the nitrocellulose finish. They say nitro is the best and that’s what I use. I think there are ovens and drying rooms that you can set up that make the process go faster, but I don’t really have room for that at the moment.

LS: I actually think it’s cool that you let it dry and cure naturally, so to speak. You’re not rushing it and it seems like a much more organic process in that sense. So, who are some of the guitarists you’ve worked with? I know Alonzo Pennington is a well-known customer, but who are some of the others?

JH: Yeah, Alonzo is definitely a more well-known customer. One of my buddies from college, Bryan Fox, has actually bought four from me. He’s buying his fifth from me right now. He collects guitars and I guess he believes in me. [laughs] The first guitar I made for him was inspired by Waylon Jennings’ famous black and white, leather-bound [Fender] Telecaster. He’s like, “I want that,” and I was like, “I don’t work with leather!” [laughs] He said he just wanted my take on it. So, I hand carved a rose and all the vines on top of a really nice piece of figured, black-dyed maple. It turned out great. He just shoots me new ideas and we go with it. After I finish up with the two I’m working on now, I’ll start in on his next one.

LS: Yeah, tell me about the two you're working on now—the paisley bass and the Gretsch-inspired white hollow body.

JH: Yeah, I’m building those for two other guys that have been good to me. They’re friends of Bryan [Fox] up in Louisville, KY. One is for Chip Adams, who is the director of the Louisville School of Rock. He’s a great guy. He said to make him a bass and it’s turning out well. The other guy, Kevin McCreery, who’s friends with both Chip and Bryan, used to play with Tantric. I guess I got with Kevin right as he was starting to work and tour with Uncle Kracker, which is what he’s doing now. He’s a touring guitarist. Bryan was like, “Get Kevin a guitar right now!” I was like, “Well, I’m finishing a guitar right now, so take it!” [laughs] I gave it to him and he ended up really liking it. After that, I got with him about making another one, because guys like him get endorsed by the bigger companies, like G&L and Gibson, and they send guitars for them play. There was a point where I didn’t see him playing my guitar all the time and I was like, “No. I can’t deal with this.” So, I stayed on him about building another one. He said that he had always liked Gretsch White Falcons, so I told him I’d do my take on it. I’m hoping they don’t have a patent on white paint and gold sparkle binding. [laughs] Other guys that play my guitars are Drew Lambert from Sam Hunter & The Two Tones and Ronnie Paul Kingery of the Glen Templeton Band. They were actually both in the Glen Templeton Band. Ronnie wanted a guitar and Drew saw the whole process, became interested in my stuff, and had me build a bass guitar. Drew’s was the five-string black and green bass I made. It turned out really well.

LS: That reminds of me of something I wanted to ask you. What’s been one of your favorite guitars to build so far?

JH: “Goldie” was my old standby. I played it out a lot. That’s really hard question, though. In truth, my favorite is always the last one I’m finishing.

LS: Is there anything that you get “third-party” help on during a build?

JH: Up until about two guitars back, I did every single detail myself. Now, though, I’ve got a good friend, Tony Dorris—who has his own amp company called Volition Amps—helping me out with installing and wiring the electronics. He makes his own effects pedals and amps. They’re all boutique. Tony’s kind of like a mad scientist, too. Of course, he’s a down-to-earth, awesome guy, but he has this mad scientist thing where when he talks to me I’m like, “I can tell you how I want this to sound, but I have no idea what you’re talking about right now.” [laughs] He’s done the wiring in the past three guitars. If it’s artwork outside that I do, he’s doing artwork on the inside. Now you can take off my [electronics] covers and it’s like human anatomy in there. Everything’s laid out perfect. Before, I’d just wire everything myself and it wasn’t perfect, to say the least. I got pretty good at soldering, and I can read a schematic just fine, but I didn’t know the real technical theory behind what I was hooking up. So, Tony is my go-to guy for all the electronics. It’s pretty cool too, because we bounce ideas off each other and come up with new wiring possibilities.

LS: So, is your son, Ian, who is two-years-old, rocking out on the guitar yet?

JH: If he could pick up a guitar, it would be smashed. [laughs] I call him Sid Vicious.

LS: Where did the idea come from for your signature “Harper scroll” cutaway on your guitars?

JH: There are actually two different things that are kind of like my signatures: the scroll on the bout of the body and the headstock scroll. The headstock scroll is kind of 3-D. On some of my earlier designs, I was drawing inspiration from the blueprint of an old F5 mandolin I had. I liked how they did the scroll and I tried to incorporate that scroll in those designs, but I actually made a mistake by cutting it at the wrong angle. That’s really how that came about and you can see how the design has changed over time in my guitars. Some of it comes from a need for simplicity too, especially when it comes to putting the binding on.

LS: I was actually thinking that applying the binding, especially when it comes to the "f-holes” on one of your hollow bodies, might have been another one of the most difficult or frustrating parts of a build too.

JH: Oh man, it really is sometimes. I think of it as the game of Operation where it buzzes when you touch the sides. That’s just how frustrating it can become. [laughs]

LS: With so many guitar companies making instruments on a mass-produced scale, what makes a handmade, custom guitar special now?

JH: You can really argue for both sides of the market. If I ever expanded and had to step up production, I would probably add a CNC [Computer Numerical Control] machine to my equipment just to cut the rough outs, because you can lose a finger working with your hands. I’d rather have a machine doing that part for me. There’s something to say about people who mass produce guitars, too, because they have specific tolerances they work with. You can pick up one guitar and then another down the road and they’ll feel the same. There’s consistency there. When you do it by hand, you really have to take your time. You get a guitar, take all the critical dimensions from it, write it all down in a notebook, and you say, “That’s going to be my next guitar.” Then, you have to look back at it and figure out everything you did, and you’ll sit there with a micrometer and measure it all out. It’s a slower process, but you can feel a real difference in the end product. There are always going to be these little imperfections that remind you it was handmade. They’re not bad imperfections. With wood grain, the bigger companies will trash a body blank with a small imperfection because they can, whereas I’ll work that imperfection into the guitar as a focal point. It’s just a lot of work doing it by hand and getting all the tolerances the same. Now, you can pick up one of my guitars and say, “That’s a good feeling neck,” and you can pick up another one and it will feel the same. It’s taken me a while to get to that point.

LS: I think those little imperfections are things that people should still value about anything handmade. You know, making instruments by hand is how it all started, and you’re carrying that tradition into the modern world.

JH: For sure. There’s definitely something to say about the way I make them, too. You know, the guy who’s playing one of my guitars knows that it was made it a shop and knows all the specific components it was made with—the woods, the design, and all the electronics. I also send my customers pictures of the process so they can see exactly what’s happening and where I’m at with it, which is something I think is pretty cool. I’ll give them a CD of all the pictures I took, too; they go all the way from the chunk of wood I got at the mill to the finished product. I don’t really know if there’s an argument about which way is better—handmade or mass-produced—but it’s kind of like, “Why do you buy the Rolls-Royce instead of the Ford?” I’m not saying my guitars are a Rolls-Royce, but it’s the same concept.

LS: Specifically, what are some of the customization options that you offer? Is it pretty much wide open to the customer?

JH: I love that each guitar is different. People call and they’re like, “I have this idea and I hope I can make it happen.” And really, the sky is the limit, but I’m learning something new every time. I like to stay with my shape just to keep my name and signature out there. Fortunately, unique finishes are really a popular thing, so I don’t have to change the body shapes too much. With finishes, I’ll try anything pretty much. I’ve been successful with all of them so far. The last one that I did, a flat black eight string guitar, was difficult. That was the first time I’d done a flat finish on a guitar. It’s nothing like going to Lowe’s and picking out flat paint. It truly is a pain. On that guitar, I had it all completed, everything on it, and all the electronics had been tested, but all of a sudden the paint started cracking on the back. There were big red cracks. It was basically some kind of chemical reaction between the lacquer I used and the paint that caused it to happen. So I had to strip everything off. I had big chemical gloves on and got some heavy grit steel wool and just worked all of it off. I try to be as clean as I can with filters, but with satin finishes you get it all glassy, put it in the paint booth, spray it, and you hope that one little piece of dust doesn’t land on it. But it’s all whatever the customer wants. I can get different woods, electronics, tuners, bridges, and I can make the finishes happen.

LS: I know that you won’t build an exact clone of a well-know style of guitar. For people who ask you why you won’t make one, what do you say?

JH: I won’t, because it’s just a waste of time. You know, for the guy who decides to call Stewart-MacDonald, orders a Les Paul guitar kit, and puts it all together, that’s fine. But if you’re calling yourself a builder and you’re using a kit, you’re really not a guitar builder. There’s so much knowledge to gain when it comes to really building a guitar, from tools to wood to processes. I actually want to make a name for myself and the company. I want this company to last into the future, and I think having a signature shape on a quality guitar is the key. It’s what keeps me up at night. I’ll send a guitar out and I’ll just worry about it making to the customer safely, and I really hope the customer loves it. I’ve had guitars go out and the customer will call and say there’s something wrong. I’ll pay to have it sent back and I’ll fix whatever is wrong on my own dime. I don’t think I’ll ever turn a customer away after they've paid when something’s wrong or if there’s something they don’t like. Everyone is genuine about any issues they have, too, so I’m always going to make it right. I think that’s the only way to be.

LS: What you do really is an art form. There aren’t that many people that are true luthiers, but it’s a centuries-old craft. With that in mind, what keeps you inspired and moving forward?

JH: Getting custom build orders and having people call and say that they have a new idea is really what gets me inspired to do this. I could build a copy of one I’ve made before and be just as happy, though. I really enjoy doing it. If I did any more volume that what I do now, I could see certain parts of it becoming kind of monotonous, but I just really love doing all of it. You know, there’s the kid in school who has to explain what their dad does for a career and some say an accountant while others say a firefighter. Of course, the kids are going to think the firefighter is awesome.

LS: So, basically, you want to be the dad who builds rock n’ roll guitars. [laughs] That’s a pretty cool profession to pursue. Why do you think music and art forms like guitar building are still relevant and important for people to hold on to, to respect?

JH: It’s a release. It’s a universal way to communicate with people. Anybody could talk about music and art and find common ground. Or, at the very least, it can start a discussion. Plus, I think it makes the world a little bit smaller. It brings everything together. You can learn more about other cultures through music. It may sound lofty, but it’s true. As far as what I listen to, it really depends on my mood. I’ll listen to just about anything other than hardcore rap, but I’m a Beastie Boys fan from way back believe it or not.

LS: At the end of the day, why would you ultimately tell someone to check out Harper Guitars?

JH: You’re getting something boutique. A lot of people will argue that something boutique just costs more, but that’s not the issue. There are regular guys and girls out there making things with their hands and I think that’s worth the extra money to get that. You know, it’s like the “Walmart versus Ma & Pa stores” argument. Walmart makes it easier to get everything in one place, but when you spend a little extra time searching things out you can get something better usually. When people get my guitars, they know that every little piece of it has been looked over and all the details have been paid close attention to. Plus, I’m a musician. I’m not going to give someone something that I don’t enjoy playing. I put a lot of care and time into it because it’s something I really enjoy.

_______________________________________________

Want to find more on Harper (JIH) Guitars, such as additional photos, how to order a custom creation, artist testimonials, and more? Visit the official Harper (JIH) Guitars website at this link: http://www.jihguitars.com/. You can also interact with Jacob Harper or peruse additional photos of his works by visiting the “JIH – Custom & Handmade Guitars” Facebook page.

To read a “Gear Guide” on Alonzo Pennington’s custom “Goldie” guitar, which was made by Harper (JIH) Guitars, click here. A full interview with Alonzo Pennington can be found here.

Sugg Street Post
Writing/Interview by Luke Short
Photos by Jessi Smith

Read more...

Semi-Homesteading with Mama Cass: Homemade Vanilla Extract

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (6/11/13)—The best part about working at a library, besides having an unlimited number of books at your disposal, is you get to play Sherlock Holmes. Every day I would receive phone calls from people who had questions and needed an answer. Most were students who needed homework help, some wanted a third party perspective to settle a dispute, and a few were just curious, but each person gave me a chance to play detective and find answers to questions I may have never thought to ask. Thanks to random callers, I know the fines associated with harassing red-tailed hawks, how starfish reproduce, and the supernatural beings associated with Western Kentucky. While I have always considered myself to be a rather inquisitive individual, being immersed in a sea of questions for the better part of six years has undoubtedly helped to nourish my curiosity. I find myself spending a great deal of my time wondering, and more than once I’ve been accused of being “random” when after a long silence I’ll pose a question. I just want to know things and I don’t consider curiosity a vice, even if it is rumored to kill a lot of cats.

My “need to know” is exactly how I came across my first vanilla bean. I am a member of the Pennyroyal Herb Club and, at the time, the club had vanilla beans to purchase for their annual Christmas at Munn’s Open House. I had never seen a vanilla bean in my life and, while I had no clue how to use them, I purchased a few out of curiosity and took them home. With the exception of the pod, vanilla beans aren’t exactly very “bean-like.” I sliced open the pod and expected to find little black beans inside. Not quite. If you’ve ever had real-deal vanilla ice cream, I’m sure you noticed those tiny dark specks. That’s what is inside. It smells like heaven and it’s those fragrant morsels that are responsible for the flavor.

Besides being delicious and aromatic, vanilla beans are also a very high-needs crop. Vanilla beans primarily come from flat-leafed vanilla orchids, which must be pollinated by hand, harvested by hand and then cured for several months before they are ready to be sold. The entire process takes around ten months and this work is reflected in their price tag. Unless you have access to wholesale prices—and a need for thirty plus beans—expect to pay $4-$6 a bean. Due to this expense, recipes that call for one to two beans aren’t made very often. So what’s a vanilla lover with a budget supposed to do? The most price effective way of using vanilla is in the form of extract—PURE vanilla extract, not that imitation nonsense. Yes, it is much cheaper than the real deal, and I admit I am guilty of purchasing imitation vanilla in desperate times, but you aren’t doing your baked goods any favors. The difference between imitation and pure vanilla extract is like the difference between a chicken and a Velociraptor. You’re not fooling anyone.

Most “pure” extracts in stores don’t quite live up to their name when you glance at the ingredients label. They are either watered down or contain a sugar-syrup solution and artificial colors. These extra ingredients, in my opinion, distract from the real flavor of the vanilla bean. Plus, an itsy-bitsy bottle will set you back nearly $10. By investing in a few beans and a bottle of alcohol, you can have a never ending supply of real vanilla at your disposal. I’ll show you how.

1) You’ll need to acquire some vanilla beans and some alcohol. There are many different places to buy vanilla beans online. Here is one. Here is another. Just do a search for “where to buy vanilla beans” and you’ll be swamped with selection. As for alcohol, vodka, rum, and bourbon will all work nicely as long as it’s something high proof. I used Captain Morgan’s Spiced Rum because it is what I had on hand. I’m just going to go ahead and say it is not really okay to use super cheap alcohol at this point. Your vanilla won’t blow up or anything, but it won’t be as nice as it can be. So c’mon, splurge a little and get some mid-priced booze. Or top shelf booze if you are feeling fancy. This is your extract. Feel free to mix it up. Go crazy. Just not too crazy, we are trying to make extract here, guys.
2) Here comes the fun part. If you have never seen the inside of a vanilla bean and are easily entertained, oh man, are you in luck. Holding the vanilla bean on a cutting board, take a paring knife (or a pair of scissors) and slice it down the middle. Now isn’t that cool? Prepare to be completely covered in those little delicious flecks. They will hide in your nails for the rest of your life—or until your next manicure.

3) Shove the split bean pods into your clean glass jar. The math is three beans to one cup of alcohol. Put a lid on your extract, store it in a dark spot (like the back of your cabinet) and wait at least two months. This is the hardest part, but the end results are amazing. Plus, when your bottle starts to run out, you can simply top off the bottle with more alcohol, wait another few months, and voila! More vanilla. It’s everlasting. It’s easy. It’s still stuck under my nails.

If you would like your own vanilla extract, but don’t want to mess with the hassle of making it, I will have extract for sale at the Mad Flavor Arts & Music Fest in Madisonville, KY this Saturday. I will be at the Learn’d Housewife’s booth. Hope to see you there!

Sugg Street Post
Written by Cassie Pendergraff
Photos courtesy of Cassie Pendergraff

Read more...
  • Published in Music

MAD Flavor Fest - Through the Eyes of the Artists

MADISONVILLE, KY (5/28/13)—Madisonville’s first premier music, arts, and film festival, the Mad Flavor Fest, is coming up on Saturday, June 15th, 2013 at the Ballard Convention Center—and it’s no surprise that the inaugural event is garnering attention from communities across the tri-state region and beyond. With an ever-growing lineup of entertainment that currently includes performances by 13 local and out-of-state bands, over 15 art-based vendor booths, 11 US and internationally-produced independent films, a variety of family-friendly activities, food, refreshments such as beer and wine, and more, the festival is poised to be one of the tri-state area’s most entertaining summer events.

But what originally prompted a festival of this scale?

In the late spring of 2012, a powerful concept materialized before former Madisonville resident and The Late Circuit DJ, Mat Pentecost: to organize Madisonville’s first large-scale, collaboration-based arts and music festival that would showcase the wide swath of talent our region holds, while also supporting a positive cause (which, in this case, would become the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross).

As Pentecost explains, the idea came to him after revisiting music he had created with friends in Hopkins County. From there, he pondered upon the relatively unrecognized talent he was surrounded by throughout his youth, and he came to a realization that this underlying, albeit powerful, sense of synergy deserved a place in the public spotlight.

Soon after, Pentecost created a Facebook page that would help to gauge interest in such an event while also serving as a platform for regional collaboration among artists, musicians, filmmakers, and volunteers. The response was immediate and notable, leading Pentecost to take the first steps onto what would become a year-long path of planning, mediation, and overall event organization.

Today, just over a year later, Pentecost’s original vision is mere weeks away from becoming a tangible reality thanks to the support of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, a variety of volunteers and supporters, local artists, musicians, filmmakers, and many more helping hands.

And while the recently launched Mad Flavor Fest website—www.madflavorfest.com—contains information on performers, artists, ticket prices, vendor participation, films, and much more, the Sugg Street Post has reached out to many of the people involved with the festival over the past few weeks to get their take on why the upcoming event is so important to our community, as well as why they got involved. Their respective responses are as follows. 

The Organizers
QUESTIONS:
1.) Why did you decide to get involved with the festival as a volunteer?
2.) Why is a festival like this so important to our region?

Mat Pentecost
I incidentally started this thing because I was listening to a lot of old cassette tape recordings of StereoPop. I just wanted to goof off and hang out with my friends again. I was certain that I wasn't alone in that feeling. I feel that the festival is important because I don't want greater Hopkins County to lose the talent and forward-thinking visionaries that I know this region produces due to boredom and lack of positive stimuli. This happened with most of my generation. Most of us moved away. Why? What happened? Or more importantly, what didn't happen?

Seth Owen 
I decided to volunteer so I could help play a part in promoting the local art scene and businesses in the community where I grew up. Having multiple public outlets available throughout the year where artists can perform and display their talents are important, as is providing local businesses more opportunities to succeed. Growing up playing drums in a few different indie bands in Hopkins County and performing at different events was something I am grateful for having done—especially after living in a few different large metropolitan areas, I see how big of a role the arts have in our daily lives.

Whitney Drewe Wardrip 
I got involved because it is an honor that the festival benefits the Red Cross. We are thrilled to be a part of such an awesome event that is so desperately needed in our community!







Christopher Mcdonald

From as far back as I can remember, I've had a love for, and have felt a deep connection with, music and the arts. Living in this town, I've had the honor to grow up with and form friendships with some intensely talented artists and musicians. Unfortunately, as has been discussed, there are few venues and platforms in the area for these amazing minds to display their gifts. So when Mat shot this idea out, I jumped at the opportunity to help in anyway he needed me. The fact that this thing evolved into a charity event to benefit the Red Cross was the icing on the cake. I knew how huge this could be for the community both artistically and economically. I knew I didn't have nearly as much to offer as the majority of the group, and was humbled to be asked to be a part of what I see becoming the single greatest gathering of local talent seen here to date. This thing is like a dream come true.

Jessica Dockrey 
I got involved with the festival because I love collaboration on a massive scale. It's truly amazing to see what I would consider a piece of collage art, the festival, come to life. People need to appreciate the people that surround them. Being able to share your talents with your community is important to each individual as well as the area as a whole. Love where you live. It's easy if you involve yourself in what's going on around you and make yourself aware of all the reasons to appreciate all that deserves to be appreciated. Acknowledge the people that actively contribute in your life experience.


The Musicians

QUESTIONS:
1.) Where do you call home and who all is a part of your band?
2.) Why did you decide to get involved with this festival?
3.) Why is music and art important to both smaller communities and society at large?

Philosopher’s Stone
(http://pstonemusic.com/)
 
We create music in the hills of Boone County, KY. The four of us live in northern Kentucky just across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. The music makers in Philosopher’s Stone are Chris Laile (bass), John Carrico (drums), Jon '8k' Divita (keys/synthesis) and me, Brad Denham (guitar/vox).

We were invited to perform at the inaugural MAD Flavor Fest via Mat Pentencost, who we have played music with in Cincinnati. Matty P has performed at many of our shows over the years and usually ends up on stage with us for live jams.

Music is an integral part of society…it is essential to completeness. Music and song are basic human functions, like the beating heart or breathing. Like birds and crickets, we all have a song. A quick search of the internet yields an interesting fact: "there is no international law that requires a country to adopt an anthem, yet currently every country has realized that this is something that is needed as part of a national identity. An anthem is used to musically express what a country—or any other group of people—stand for and what unites them.” (www.nationalanthems.info) Music allows us to express our fears, our pain, our wants and desires; it enlightens, elates, and transcends. Above all else, it can express our deepest love. A song can speak for the things that are not easily said. Like a needle in the groove, music imprints itself on the human heart and brain capturing the experience and moment in time, and, upon listening again, those memories and feelings are triggered and can be relived again and again. There is nothing like a great song that can magically take you back to relive your childhood.

If I had to choose between losing my sight or losing my hearing, I would choose sight. The first thing you do when you hear something beautiful or when you experience pleasure is shut your eyes.

Pat Ballard
(http://www.reverbnation.com/patballard)

My home is Hopkins County. The guys I’ll be playing with at the festival are Jon Gilbert (guitar), Gary Madison (bass), Clint Combs (drums), and maybe Johnny Keyz (keyboard).

When I found out about Mat and what he was putting together, and his passion and drive to showcase the talent here and regionally, I just wanted to help in any way I could. Mat has worked really hard to bring so many people together for a great cause, which is not only a benefit for the Red Cross, but also a benefit to all of us by getting so many musicians from this area at one festival.

It’s hard to articulate an answer to the last one. The benefits of the arts to all communities are just so intangible. It really gives us artsy types a little more room to breathe.

Falter
(https://www.facebook.com/FalterMusic)

Home for Falter is right here in Hopkins County. With the exception of our drummer Bryan Thomas who resides in Hopkinsville, KY, all other members (Kevin Offutt, John Pierce, Brad Wilson, Adam O’Rear) were raised right here in Hopkins County.

We in Falter are big believers in giving back to our community, charities, and to society in general. Each year we set aside time and promotions for events such as the Mad Flavor Fest. We have done quite a few this year. Most recently, we played the Thumbs Up For What’s Wright Benefit in Nashville at the Tin Roof. We have had very much support from our fans, especially the fans right here in Hopkins County, so we were thrilled at the chance of being a part of this event for our hometown community and for the American Red Cross. It’s been some time now since we’ve been able to play a show right here at home due to scheduling issues, so being a part of this event is very exciting because allows a way to raise money for the American Red Cross while also bringing awareness to this community, which is a plentiful melting pot of talent. Whether it be musicianship or the arts, Hopkins County is rich with both.

There are so many points that I could address on the matter of music and art’s importance and role in raising of a cultured and great society. Music was a huge part of my life personally, and at no matter what point of my life, I have always acknowledged there has been an overwhelming yearning and calling in my life for music. I am following the calling now on a larger scale, but even if I wasn’t, music will always be a large part of me. To us, the biggest importance to a community and society is self expression and our rights and freedom. So many times I have heard stories of schools cutting the arts programs, and this saddens me because these programs give kids the avenue to find their true passions as artists.

JT Oglesby
(www.facebook.com/jtoglesby)

I am a gypsy-spirited vagabond that embarked on a spiritual journey exploring the musical and creative aspects of the world during my teens, which continues to this day. My band consists of rounders, misfits, and other miscreants I have encountered over the years that embrace a noncompliant societal and creative view. These roustabouts frequently change, making my band an ever-shifting work-in-progress. Each unique version explores a different path unknown to the incarnations before it.

I wanted to get involved with this festival because I am proud to be a Kentuckian and I am proud to be from this area. My family has lived and died in this area for so long that there is more of my DNA in this soil than dirt. I want to do whatever I can to help promote and preserve our heritage and culture. A lot of people say it, but few truly mean it: LLKM! Long Live Kentucky Music!

Hollywood Gutterats
(www.facebook.com/HollywoodGutterats)

Home is where the rock is! The Hollywood Gutterats are Slush (lead vox and guitar), Yngwie Springsteen (guitar), Micheal Anthony Hall (bass), and Tommy Lee Greenwood (drums).

Why did we get involved? Because Slush and Mat Pentacost both like Taco Bell Chalupas!

Music and art is important because it touches everyone in one way or another. And who doesn’t like to be touched?

Technology Versus Horse
(www.reverbnation.com/technologyvshorse)

Technology Versus Horse as a band is from Bowling Green, KY. We all met while/shortly after attending WKU. We are composed of Mike Farmer (vocals), myself (Rafe Heltsley–guitar), Matt Bitner (bass), David Prater (keys), and Josh Hines (drums).

I grew up in White Plains, KY and went to high school in Madisonville (Hopkins County Central High School). When Mat Pentecost was thinking about throwing the festival, he mentioned it to me. I thought it sounded like a great idea and wanted my band to play to show our support.

Music and art are very important outlets of expression. They also help gather people together, bonding over a shared favorite band or artist or meeting up at local shows.

The Fair-Weather Kings
(www.facebook.com/thefairweatherkings)

The Fair-Weather Kings started in Bowling Green KY and all of us still live here. Our members our Wesley Stone, Zach Barton, Jason Williams, Craig Brown, and Marcus Long

Zach and I (Wesley) grew up in Madisonville. Marcus is also from Hopkins County. So we have "roots" there, so to speak. Zach and Marcus' parents still live in Hopkins County. So, for us, getting involved with the festival was about the opportunity to be involved in an event that not only benefits the American Red Cross, but also brings art, in various forms, to a town that a few of us have called home.

Art and music are important because they are "tools" that have many uses; free to anyone that desires them.

The Artists and Vendors
QUESTIONS:
1.) What's your personal info (name, age, hometown, business name and overview, etc.)?
2.) Why is your art form or craft important to you personally?
3.) Why did you decide to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest? OR Why is the festival important to our community?

MCC Humanities Division
(www.madisonville.kctcs.edu/)

Myself (Brooke Archila) and perhaps a few others will be setting up a booth to represent the Humanities Division at Madisonville Community College. The Humanities Division is an eclectic group of instructors who teach classes in the fields of English, history, communications, foreign languages, music, reading, art, and women's studies. We support and promote anything related to these areas on campus and in the community. The study of humanities in various forms is essential to understanding ourselves and the world around us. Through these areas of study, we express our creativity and share in the creativity of others. In our representation of our department at the festival, we want to share the many cool things we have going on in the fall and encourage involvement and support!

Bad Apple Paintwerks
(www.facebook.com/BadApplePaintwerks)
My name is Patrick Harvey and I'm the owner of Bad Apple Paintwerks. I'm 38 and my hometown is Hopkins County. I create art directed towards the musically inclined.

Why is what I do important to me personally? A favorite quote of mine might sum that up: "Paint chips make me thirsty."

I decided to get involved with this festival because I live here and I want to help promote the arts in our community when I have the chance. 

HoldFast WoodCO.
(www.facebook.com/HoldfastWoodCo)
 
My name is Cody McDowell. I’m 24 years old and live in Madisonville, KY. I’m the owner of HoldFast WoodCO. I create simple custom furniture and home decor.

Woodworking is important to me because it’s becoming a lost art, yet it’s one of the basic trades that defines us as a country and as a civilization in general. I think that using reclaimed materials and old tools to do my work is also an important part of what I do because anyone can go to Lowe’s and buy a new 2x4, but if you go to a barn and pull off a 2x4, it has character, it’s had purpose, and it’s been reliable for years and years. Taking something like that and making it into a coffee table for someone means they have a piece of history that will outlive them; it’s something that they can pass to their kids. The Mad Flavor Fest is important to the Hopkins County region, as well as all the local artists and crafts people, because maybe for that one day that we are set up, someone will buy a CD from a band that actually needs the money, and instead of getting something out of a box at Wal-Mart, they will buy something handmade and invest just a little money back into their local economy.

Elite Tattoo Lounge
(www.facebook.com/EliteTattooLounge)

My name is Aaron “Chappy” Chapman. I’m originally from Denver, CO and I own and operate Elite Tattoo Lounge (530 E. Center St., Madisonville KY 42431). We are a full service tattoo and body mod studio, specializing in all styles of tattooing from black and grey, to new school, to photorealism.

The art of tattooing is important to me for many reasons. First, it’s how I make my living, and I make a very good living doing it. It’s really about doing something that you love, but when you can make a living doing it, it is priceless. This is not my job, it is my career and my work. It is what people will know of me when I die.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest because I believe in Madisonville. For so long there has been a lack of focus in this area toward the arts and culture, and people here have lacked a focal point to channel their artistic talents. This town is so full of talented people it is going to burst. That is what the Mad Flavor Fest is to me: the Madisonville arts community no longer being content to stay at home, no longer being contained!

Travis Shanks
(www.facebook.com/tshanks7720?fref=ts)
 
I’m Travis Shanks, 21, and my hometown is Slaughters, KY

Painting and drawing is important to me because it's a great way to express myself. At one point in my life, it helped me escape some hard times. Art gives a way for us to bring beauty into a world where beauty is rapidly thinning.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so I could share my art with more people. And, hopefully, to become known in some way as a reputable artist in the community. The Mad Flavor Fest is most definitely important to our community and what we, as artists, are trying to achieve. Hopefully, this festival will open the eyes of the community to the true value of art, which is so often forgotten in modern times. Also, it's going to be a great place to meet all the people in the local area that share your passions. I cannot wait!

Poppy & Clover (Gina Boyd & Riley Jo Dever)
(www.facebook.com/poppyandclover?fref=ts)

We are a mother/daughter team that loves to craft. We specialize in antiques, soy candles, soaps, pillows, and many other delightful offerings. We are hoping to actually open a store by summertime so that we may invite you down for a cup of tea and to browse around—or just to stop in and say hello.

We have always enjoyed art and crafting around with each other. We decided a couple of years ago to team up and begin to create things that appeal to us and hopefully to others. I love to decorate and it is fulfilling to adorn my home with things that I have created.

We decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so that we could offer some of our goods for the public to come by and see. As we work on opening our store, we are selling things out of our home. We have been asked my many people to see our things in-person, so here is an opportunity to do that. We hope many people come out and enjoy a day of music and art that is offered by local community members.

Big Biting Pig Productions
(www.bigbitingpigproductions.com/)

Steve Hudgins: I’m originally from Chicago, IL, but I currently live in Dawson Springs, KY.

Big Biting Pig Productions specializes in feature-length thrillers and horror films. I love telling stories, acting, directing others to get the most out of themselves and watching everything come together, so being a filmmaker is kind of a natural thing for my tastes.

I think it's great to have a festival that focuses on Madisonville and helps those in the community see what is out there that they may not be aware of.

PJ Woodside: I'm PJ Woodside, living in Madisonville, originally from Charleston, SC, married to Jude Roy of Louisiana Cajun heritage. I mostly collaborate with Steve Hudgins of Big Biting Pig Productions on movie projects, such as my latest movie which will be premiering this summer, Lucid. We also make book trailers, commercials, and music videos through PJ's Productions.

I've come to appreciate horror movies much more since we started making them several years ago. They help people release their everyday fears in a nonthreatening way. The one we're showing at the festival, Spirit Stalkers, is a combination of ghost hunter’s show and a classic haunted house movie. It will have you on the edge of your seat and jumping many times, but the characters are also interesting and believable. It's important to me to tell stories that matter to people and have some emotional resonance.

I got involved, well, because you asked me! But also, there are a lot of Madisonville locations and people in our movies, so we like to share them with the local community when possible! It's always good to see what is being made right here, right under our noses!

The Learn’d Housewife
(www.facebook.com/thelearndhousewife)

I’m Cassie Pendergraff from the wonderful metropolis of Madvegas. I’m a 2002 MNHHS graduate and owner of The Learn’d Housewife. I enjoy crafting and trying new things. I’ve always loved fabric; I come from a long generation of quilters, so finding new ways to work with fabric is always an adventure. I decided to start making fabric button earrings. For me, it’s a fun way to keep memories. I can take scraps from pretty much anything—a baby quilt, a dress I’ve worn, my daughter’s coming home outfits—and make a pair of earrings or a necklace.

I decided to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest because I love supporting local artisans. It’s a great opportunity to see what’s out there in the community and get connected with other people who have similar interests. There are so many unique and creative people hiding in our hometown and it is events like the Mad Flavor Fest that gives them a chance to crawl out of the woodwork.

* * * * * * *

For more on the Mad Flavor Fest, including directions to the Ballard Convention Center (605 E. Arch St., Madisonville), ticket sales, admission information, vendor sign-up sheets, a full list of current performers, artists, vendors, filmmakers, and much more, visit the recently launched Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival website at the following address: www.MadFlavorFest.com.

You can also find the Mad Flavor Festival’s official Facebook page by clicking here.

To read another Sugg Street Post article about the Mad Flavor Fest, which was written by Jessica Dockrey, click here. To learn more about the CINEMADIC Film Festival, click here.

All ticket sales and additional proceeds raised via the Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival will go to support the efforts of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red CrossTo learn more about the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, click here.

The Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival is sponsored by the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, the Sugg Street Post, and Art Interactions

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos courtesy of Jessi Smith, Jeff Harp, and Respective Mad Flavor Festival Participants

 

Read more...
  • Published in Art

MAD Flavor Fest - Through the Eyes of the Artists

MADISONVILLE, KY (5/28/13)—Madisonville’s first premier music, arts, and film festival, the Mad Flavor Fest, is coming up on Saturday, June 15th, 2013 at the Ballard Convention Center—and it’s no surprise that the inaugural event is garnering attention from communities across the tri-state region and beyond. With an ever-growing lineup of entertainment that currently includes performances by 13 local and out-of-state bands, over 15 art-based vendor booths, 11 US and internationally-produced independent films, a variety of family-friendly activities, food, refreshments such as beer and wine, and more, the festival is poised to be one of the tri-state area’s most entertaining summer events.

But what originally prompted a festival of this scale?

In the late spring of 2012, a powerful concept materialized before former Madisonville resident and The Late Circuit DJ, Mat Pentecost: to organize Madisonville’s first large-scale, collaboration-based arts and music festival that would showcase the wide swath of talent our region holds, while also supporting a positive cause (which, in this case, would become the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross).

As Pentecost explains, the idea came to him after revisiting music he had created with friends in Hopkins County. From there, he pondered upon the relatively unrecognized talent he was surrounded by throughout his youth, and he came to a realization that this underlying, albeit powerful, sense of synergy deserved a place in the public spotlight.

Soon after, Pentecost created a Facebook page that would help to gauge interest in such an event while also serving as a platform for regional collaboration among artists, musicians, filmmakers, and volunteers. The response was immediate and notable, leading Pentecost to take the first steps onto what would become a year-long path of planning, mediation, and overall event organization.

Today, just over a year later, Pentecost’s original vision is mere weeks away from becoming a tangible reality thanks to the support of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, a variety of volunteers and supporters, local artists, musicians, filmmakers, and many more helping hands.

And while the recently launched Mad Flavor Fest website—www.madflavorfest.com—contains information on performers, artists, ticket prices, vendor participation, films, and much more, the Sugg Street Post has reached out to many of the people involved with the festival over the past few weeks to get their take on why the upcoming event is so important to our community, as well as why they got involved. Their respective responses are as follows. 

The Organizers
QUESTIONS:
1.) Why did you decide to get involved with the festival as a volunteer?
2.) Why is a festival like this so important to our region?

Mat Pentecost
I incidentally started this thing because I was listening to a lot of old cassette tape recordings of StereoPop. I just wanted to goof off and hang out with my friends again. I was certain that I wasn't alone in that feeling. I feel that the festival is important because I don't want greater Hopkins County to lose the talent and forward-thinking visionaries that I know this region produces due to boredom and lack of positive stimuli. This happened with most of my generation. Most of us moved away. Why? What happened? Or more importantly, what didn't happen?

Seth Owen 
I decided to volunteer so I could help play a part in promoting the local art scene and businesses in the community where I grew up. Having multiple public outlets available throughout the year where artists can perform and display their talents are important, as is providing local businesses more opportunities to succeed. Growing up playing drums in a few different indie bands in Hopkins County and performing at different events was something I am grateful for having done—especially after living in a few different large metropolitan areas, I see how big of a role the arts have in our daily lives.

Whitney Drewe Wardrip 
I got involved because it is an honor that the festival benefits the Red Cross. We are thrilled to be a part of such an awesome event that is so desperately needed in our community!







Christopher Mcdonald

From as far back as I can remember, I've had a love for, and have felt a deep connection with, music and the arts. Living in this town, I've had the honor to grow up with and form friendships with some intensely talented artists and musicians. Unfortunately, as has been discussed, there are few venues and platforms in the area for these amazing minds to display their gifts. So when Mat shot this idea out, I jumped at the opportunity to help in anyway he needed me. The fact that this thing evolved into a charity event to benefit the Red Cross was the icing on the cake. I knew how huge this could be for the community both artistically and economically. I knew I didn't have nearly as much to offer as the majority of the group, and was humbled to be asked to be a part of what I see becoming the single greatest gathering of local talent seen here to date. This thing is like a dream come true.

Jessica Dockrey 
I got involved with the festival because I love collaboration on a massive scale. It's truly amazing to see what I would consider a piece of collage art, the festival, come to life. People need to appreciate the people that surround them. Being able to share your talents with your community is important to each individual as well as the area as a whole. Love where you live. It's easy if you involve yourself in what's going on around you and make yourself aware of all the reasons to appreciate all that deserves to be appreciated. Acknowledge the people that actively contribute in your life experience.


The Musicians

QUESTIONS:
1.) Where do you call home and who all is a part of your band?
2.) Why did you decide to get involved with this festival?
3.) Why is music and art important to both smaller communities and society at large?

Philosopher’s Stone
(http://pstonemusic.com/)
 
We create music in the hills of Boone County, KY. The four of us live in northern Kentucky just across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. The music makers in Philosopher’s Stone are Chris Laile (bass), John Carrico (drums), Jon '8k' Divita (keys/synthesis) and me, Brad Denham (guitar/vox).

We were invited to perform at the inaugural MAD Flavor Fest via Mat Pentencost, who we have played music with in Cincinnati. Matty P has performed at many of our shows over the years and usually ends up on stage with us for live jams.

Music is an integral part of society…it is essential to completeness. Music and song are basic human functions, like the beating heart or breathing. Like birds and crickets, we all have a song. A quick search of the internet yields an interesting fact: "there is no international law that requires a country to adopt an anthem, yet currently every country has realized that this is something that is needed as part of a national identity. An anthem is used to musically express what a country—or any other group of people—stand for and what unites them.” (www.nationalanthems.info) Music allows us to express our fears, our pain, our wants and desires; it enlightens, elates, and transcends. Above all else, it can express our deepest love. A song can speak for the things that are not easily said. Like a needle in the groove, music imprints itself on the human heart and brain capturing the experience and moment in time, and, upon listening again, those memories and feelings are triggered and can be relived again and again. There is nothing like a great song that can magically take you back to relive your childhood.

If I had to choose between losing my sight or losing my hearing, I would choose sight. The first thing you do when you hear something beautiful or when you experience pleasure is shut your eyes.

Pat Ballard
(http://www.reverbnation.com/patballard)

My home is Hopkins County. The guys I’ll be playing with at the festival are Jon Gilbert (guitar), Gary Madison (bass), Clint Combs (drums), and maybe Johnny Keyz (keyboard).

When I found out about Mat and what he was putting together, and his passion and drive to showcase the talent here and regionally, I just wanted to help in any way I could. Mat has worked really hard to bring so many people together for a great cause, which is not only a benefit for the Red Cross, but also a benefit to all of us by getting so many musicians from this area at one festival.

It’s hard to articulate an answer to the last one. The benefits of the arts to all communities are just so intangible. It really gives us artsy types a little more room to breathe.

Falter
(https://www.facebook.com/FalterMusic)

Home for Falter is right here in Hopkins County. With the exception of our drummer Bryan Thomas who resides in Hopkinsville, KY, all other members (Kevin Offutt, John Pierce, Brad Wilson, Adam O’Rear) were raised right here in Hopkins County.

We in Falter are big believers in giving back to our community, charities, and to society in general. Each year we set aside time and promotions for events such as the Mad Flavor Fest. We have done quite a few this year. Most recently, we played the Thumbs Up For What’s Wright Benefit in Nashville at the Tin Roof. We have had very much support from our fans, especially the fans right here in Hopkins County, so we were thrilled at the chance of being a part of this event for our hometown community and for the American Red Cross. It’s been some time now since we’ve been able to play a show right here at home due to scheduling issues, so being a part of this event is very exciting because allows a way to raise money for the American Red Cross while also bringing awareness to this community, which is a plentiful melting pot of talent. Whether it be musicianship or the arts, Hopkins County is rich with both.

There are so many points that I could address on the matter of music and art’s importance and role in raising of a cultured and great society. Music was a huge part of my life personally, and at no matter what point of my life, I have always acknowledged there has been an overwhelming yearning and calling in my life for music. I am following the calling now on a larger scale, but even if I wasn’t, music will always be a large part of me. To us, the biggest importance to a community and society is self expression and our rights and freedom. So many times I have heard stories of schools cutting the arts programs, and this saddens me because these programs give kids the avenue to find their true passions as artists.

JT Oglesby
(www.facebook.com/jtoglesby)

I am a gypsy-spirited vagabond that embarked on a spiritual journey exploring the musical and creative aspects of the world during my teens, which continues to this day. My band consists of rounders, misfits, and other miscreants I have encountered over the years that embrace a noncompliant societal and creative view. These roustabouts frequently change, making my band an ever-shifting work-in-progress. Each unique version explores a different path unknown to the incarnations before it.

I wanted to get involved with this festival because I am proud to be a Kentuckian and I am proud to be from this area. My family has lived and died in this area for so long that there is more of my DNA in this soil than dirt. I want to do whatever I can to help promote and preserve our heritage and culture. A lot of people say it, but few truly mean it: LLKM! Long Live Kentucky Music!

Hollywood Gutterats
(www.facebook.com/HollywoodGutterats)

Home is where the rock is! The Hollywood Gutterats are Slush (lead vox and guitar), Yngwie Springsteen (guitar), Micheal Anthony Hall (bass), and Tommy Lee Greenwood (drums).

Why did we get involved? Because Slush and Mat Pentacost both like Taco Bell Chalupas!

Music and art is important because it touches everyone in one way or another. And who doesn’t like to be touched?

Technology Versus Horse
(www.reverbnation.com/technologyvshorse)

Technology Versus Horse as a band is from Bowling Green, KY. We all met while/shortly after attending WKU. We are composed of Mike Farmer (vocals), myself (Rafe Heltsley–guitar), Matt Bitner (bass), David Prater (keys), and Josh Hines (drums).

I grew up in White Plains, KY and went to high school in Madisonville (Hopkins County Central High School). When Mat Pentecost was thinking about throwing the festival, he mentioned it to me. I thought it sounded like a great idea and wanted my band to play to show our support.

Music and art are very important outlets of expression. They also help gather people together, bonding over a shared favorite band or artist or meeting up at local shows.

The Fair-Weather Kings
(www.facebook.com/thefairweatherkings)

The Fair-Weather Kings started in Bowling Green KY and all of us still live here. Our members our Wesley Stone, Zach Barton, Jason Williams, Craig Brown, and Marcus Long

Zach and I (Wesley) grew up in Madisonville. Marcus is also from Hopkins County. So we have "roots" there, so to speak. Zach and Marcus' parents still live in Hopkins County. So, for us, getting involved with the festival was about the opportunity to be involved in an event that not only benefits the American Red Cross, but also brings art, in various forms, to a town that a few of us have called home.

Art and music are important because they are "tools" that have many uses; free to anyone that desires them.

The Artists and Vendors
QUESTIONS:
1.) What's your personal info (name, age, hometown, business name and overview, etc.)?
2.) Why is your art form or craft important to you personally?
3.) Why did you decide to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest? OR Why is the festival important to our community?

MCC Humanities Division
(www.madisonville.kctcs.edu/)

Myself (Brooke Archila) and perhaps a few others will be setting up a booth to represent the Humanities Division at Madisonville Community College. The Humanities Division is an eclectic group of instructors who teach classes in the fields of English, history, communications, foreign languages, music, reading, art, and women's studies. We support and promote anything related to these areas on campus and in the community. The study of humanities in various forms is essential to understanding ourselves and the world around us. Through these areas of study, we express our creativity and share in the creativity of others. In our representation of our department at the festival, we want to share the many cool things we have going on in the fall and encourage involvement and support!

Bad Apple Paintwerks
(www.facebook.com/BadApplePaintwerks)
My name is Patrick Harvey and I'm the owner of Bad Apple Paintwerks. I'm 38 and my hometown is Hopkins County. I create art directed towards the musically inclined.

Why is what I do important to me personally? A favorite quote of mine might sum that up: "Paint chips make me thirsty."

I decided to get involved with this festival because I live here and I want to help promote the arts in our community when I have the chance. 

HoldFast WoodCO.
(www.facebook.com/HoldfastWoodCo)
 
My name is Cody McDowell. I’m 24 years old and live in Madisonville, KY. I’m the owner of HoldFast WoodCO. I create simple custom furniture and home decor.

Woodworking is important to me because it’s becoming a lost art, yet it’s one of the basic trades that defines us as a country and as a civilization in general. I think that using reclaimed materials and old tools to do my work is also an important part of what I do because anyone can go to Lowe’s and buy a new 2x4, but if you go to a barn and pull off a 2x4, it has character, it’s had purpose, and it’s been reliable for years and years. Taking something like that and making it into a coffee table for someone means they have a piece of history that will outlive them; it’s something that they can pass to their kids. The Mad Flavor Fest is important to the Hopkins County region, as well as all the local artists and crafts people, because maybe for that one day that we are set up, someone will buy a CD from a band that actually needs the money, and instead of getting something out of a box at Wal-Mart, they will buy something handmade and invest just a little money back into their local economy.

Elite Tattoo Lounge
(www.facebook.com/EliteTattooLounge)

My name is Aaron “Chappy” Chapman. I’m originally from Denver, CO and I own and operate Elite Tattoo Lounge (530 E. Center St., Madisonville KY 42431). We are a full service tattoo and body mod studio, specializing in all styles of tattooing from black and grey, to new school, to photorealism.

The art of tattooing is important to me for many reasons. First, it’s how I make my living, and I make a very good living doing it. It’s really about doing something that you love, but when you can make a living doing it, it is priceless. This is not my job, it is my career and my work. It is what people will know of me when I die.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest because I believe in Madisonville. For so long there has been a lack of focus in this area toward the arts and culture, and people here have lacked a focal point to channel their artistic talents. This town is so full of talented people it is going to burst. That is what the Mad Flavor Fest is to me: the Madisonville arts community no longer being content to stay at home, no longer being contained!

Travis Shanks
(www.facebook.com/tshanks7720?fref=ts)
 
I’m Travis Shanks, 21, and my hometown is Slaughters, KY

Painting and drawing is important to me because it's a great way to express myself. At one point in my life, it helped me escape some hard times. Art gives a way for us to bring beauty into a world where beauty is rapidly thinning.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so I could share my art with more people. And, hopefully, to become known in some way as a reputable artist in the community. The Mad Flavor Fest is most definitely important to our community and what we, as artists, are trying to achieve. Hopefully, this festival will open the eyes of the community to the true value of art, which is so often forgotten in modern times. Also, it's going to be a great place to meet all the people in the local area that share your passions. I cannot wait!

Poppy & Clover (Gina Boyd & Riley Jo Dever)
(www.facebook.com/poppyandclover?fref=ts)

We are a mother/daughter team that loves to craft. We specialize in antiques, soy candles, soaps, pillows, and many other delightful offerings. We are hoping to actually open a store by summertime so that we may invite you down for a cup of tea and to browse around—or just to stop in and say hello.

We have always enjoyed art and crafting around with each other. We decided a couple of years ago to team up and begin to create things that appeal to us and hopefully to others. I love to decorate and it is fulfilling to adorn my home with things that I have created.

We decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so that we could offer some of our goods for the public to come by and see. As we work on opening our store, we are selling things out of our home. We have been asked my many people to see our things in-person, so here is an opportunity to do that. We hope many people come out and enjoy a day of music and art that is offered by local community members.

Big Biting Pig Productions
(www.bigbitingpigproductions.com/)

Steve Hudgins: I’m originally from Chicago, IL, but I currently live in Dawson Springs, KY.

Big Biting Pig Productions specializes in feature-length thrillers and horror films. I love telling stories, acting, directing others to get the most out of themselves and watching everything come together, so being a filmmaker is kind of a natural thing for my tastes.

I think it's great to have a festival that focuses on Madisonville and helps those in the community see what is out there that they may not be aware of.

PJ Woodside: I'm PJ Woodside, living in Madisonville, originally from Charleston, SC, married to Jude Roy of Louisiana Cajun heritage. I mostly collaborate with Steve Hudgins of Big Biting Pig Productions on movie projects, such as my latest movie which will be premiering this summer, Lucid. We also make book trailers, commercials, and music videos through PJ's Productions.

I've come to appreciate horror movies much more since we started making them several years ago. They help people release their everyday fears in a nonthreatening way. The one we're showing at the festival, Spirit Stalkers, is a combination of ghost hunter’s show and a classic haunted house movie. It will have you on the edge of your seat and jumping many times, but the characters are also interesting and believable. It's important to me to tell stories that matter to people and have some emotional resonance.

I got involved, well, because you asked me! But also, there are a lot of Madisonville locations and people in our movies, so we like to share them with the local community when possible! It's always good to see what is being made right here, right under our noses!

The Learn’d Housewife
(www.facebook.com/thelearndhousewife)

I’m Cassie Pendergraff from the wonderful metropolis of Madvegas. I’m a 2002 MNHHS graduate and owner of The Learn’d Housewife. I enjoy crafting and trying new things. I’ve always loved fabric; I come from a long generation of quilters, so finding new ways to work with fabric is always an adventure. I decided to start making fabric button earrings. For me, it’s a fun way to keep memories. I can take scraps from pretty much anything—a baby quilt, a dress I’ve worn, my daughter’s coming home outfits—and make a pair of earrings or a necklace.

I decided to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest because I love supporting local artisans. It’s a great opportunity to see what’s out there in the community and get connected with other people who have similar interests. There are so many unique and creative people hiding in our hometown and it is events like the Mad Flavor Fest that gives them a chance to crawl out of the woodwork.

* * * * * * *

For more on the Mad Flavor Fest, including directions to the Ballard Convention Center (605 E. Arch St., Madisonville), ticket sales, admission information, vendor sign-up sheets, a full list of current performers, artists, vendors, filmmakers, and much more, visit the recently launched Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival website at the following address: www.MadFlavorFest.com.

You can also find the Mad Flavor Festival’s official Facebook page by clicking here.

To read another Sugg Street Post article about the Mad Flavor Fest, which was written by Jessica Dockrey, click here. To learn more about the CINEMADIC Film Festival, click here.

All ticket sales and additional proceeds raised via the Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival will go to support the efforts of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red CrossTo learn more about the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, click here.

The Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival is sponsored by the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, the Sugg Street Post, and Art Interactions

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos courtesy of Jessi Smith, Jeff Harp, and Respective Mad Flavor Festival Participants

 

Read more...

MAD Flavor Fest - Through the Eyes of the Artists

MADISONVILLE, KY (5/28/13)—Madisonville’s first premier music, arts, and film festival, the Mad Flavor Fest, is coming up on Saturday, June 15th, 2013 at the Ballard Convention Center—and it’s no surprise that the inaugural event is garnering attention from communities across the tri-state region and beyond. With an ever-growing lineup of entertainment that currently includes performances by 13 local and out-of-state bands, over 15 art-based vendor booths, 11 US and internationally-produced independent films, a variety of family-friendly activities, food, refreshments such as beer and wine, and more, the festival is poised to be one of the tri-state area’s most entertaining summer events.

But what originally prompted a festival of this scale?

In the late spring of 2012, a powerful concept materialized before former Madisonville resident and The Late Circuit DJ, Mat Pentecost: to organize Madisonville’s first large-scale, collaboration-based arts and music festival that would showcase the wide swath of talent our region holds, while also supporting a positive cause (which, in this case, would become the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross).

As Pentecost explains, the idea came to him after revisiting music he had created with friends in Hopkins County. From there, he pondered upon the relatively unrecognized talent he was surrounded by throughout his youth, and he came to a realization that this underlying, albeit powerful, sense of synergy deserved a place in the public spotlight.

Soon after, Pentecost created a Facebook page that would help to gauge interest in such an event while also serving as a platform for regional collaboration among artists, musicians, filmmakers, and volunteers. The response was immediate and notable, leading Pentecost to take the first steps onto what would become a year-long path of planning, mediation, and overall event organization.

Today, just over a year later, Pentecost’s original vision is mere weeks away from becoming a tangible reality thanks to the support of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, a variety of volunteers and supporters, local artists, musicians, filmmakers, and many more helping hands.

And while the recently launched Mad Flavor Fest website—www.madflavorfest.com—contains information on performers, artists, ticket prices, vendor participation, films, and much more, the Sugg Street Post has reached out to many of the people involved with the festival over the past few weeks to get their take on why the upcoming event is so important to our community, as well as why they got involved. Their respective responses are as follows. 

The Organizers
QUESTIONS:
1.) Why did you decide to get involved with the festival as a volunteer?
2.) Why is a festival like this so important to our region?

Mat Pentecost
I incidentally started this thing because I was listening to a lot of old cassette tape recordings of StereoPop. I just wanted to goof off and hang out with my friends again. I was certain that I wasn't alone in that feeling. I feel that the festival is important because I don't want greater Hopkins County to lose the talent and forward-thinking visionaries that I know this region produces due to boredom and lack of positive stimuli. This happened with most of my generation. Most of us moved away. Why? What happened? Or more importantly, what didn't happen?

Seth Owen 
I decided to volunteer so I could help play a part in promoting the local art scene and businesses in the community where I grew up. Having multiple public outlets available throughout the year where artists can perform and display their talents are important, as is providing local businesses more opportunities to succeed. Growing up playing drums in a few different indie bands in Hopkins County and performing at different events was something I am grateful for having done—especially after living in a few different large metropolitan areas, I see how big of a role the arts have in our daily lives.

Whitney Drewe Wardrip 
I got involved because it is an honor that the festival benefits the Red Cross. We are thrilled to be a part of such an awesome event that is so desperately needed in our community!







Christopher Mcdonald

From as far back as I can remember, I've had a love for, and have felt a deep connection with, music and the arts. Living in this town, I've had the honor to grow up with and form friendships with some intensely talented artists and musicians. Unfortunately, as has been discussed, there are few venues and platforms in the area for these amazing minds to display their gifts. So when Mat shot this idea out, I jumped at the opportunity to help in anyway he needed me. The fact that this thing evolved into a charity event to benefit the Red Cross was the icing on the cake. I knew how huge this could be for the community both artistically and economically. I knew I didn't have nearly as much to offer as the majority of the group, and was humbled to be asked to be a part of what I see becoming the single greatest gathering of local talent seen here to date. This thing is like a dream come true.

Jessica Dockrey 
I got involved with the festival because I love collaboration on a massive scale. It's truly amazing to see what I would consider a piece of collage art, the festival, come to life. People need to appreciate the people that surround them. Being able to share your talents with your community is important to each individual as well as the area as a whole. Love where you live. It's easy if you involve yourself in what's going on around you and make yourself aware of all the reasons to appreciate all that deserves to be appreciated. Acknowledge the people that actively contribute in your life experience.


The Musicians

QUESTIONS:
1.) Where do you call home and who all is a part of your band?
2.) Why did you decide to get involved with this festival?
3.) Why is music and art important to both smaller communities and society at large?

Philosopher’s Stone
(http://pstonemusic.com/)
 
We create music in the hills of Boone County, KY. The four of us live in northern Kentucky just across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. The music makers in Philosopher’s Stone are Chris Laile (bass), John Carrico (drums), Jon '8k' Divita (keys/synthesis) and me, Brad Denham (guitar/vox).

We were invited to perform at the inaugural MAD Flavor Fest via Mat Pentencost, who we have played music with in Cincinnati. Matty P has performed at many of our shows over the years and usually ends up on stage with us for live jams.

Music is an integral part of society…it is essential to completeness. Music and song are basic human functions, like the beating heart or breathing. Like birds and crickets, we all have a song. A quick search of the internet yields an interesting fact: "there is no international law that requires a country to adopt an anthem, yet currently every country has realized that this is something that is needed as part of a national identity. An anthem is used to musically express what a country—or any other group of people—stand for and what unites them.” (www.nationalanthems.info) Music allows us to express our fears, our pain, our wants and desires; it enlightens, elates, and transcends. Above all else, it can express our deepest love. A song can speak for the things that are not easily said. Like a needle in the groove, music imprints itself on the human heart and brain capturing the experience and moment in time, and, upon listening again, those memories and feelings are triggered and can be relived again and again. There is nothing like a great song that can magically take you back to relive your childhood.

If I had to choose between losing my sight or losing my hearing, I would choose sight. The first thing you do when you hear something beautiful or when you experience pleasure is shut your eyes.

Pat Ballard
(http://www.reverbnation.com/patballard)

My home is Hopkins County. The guys I’ll be playing with at the festival are Jon Gilbert (guitar), Gary Madison (bass), Clint Combs (drums), and maybe Johnny Keyz (keyboard).

When I found out about Mat and what he was putting together, and his passion and drive to showcase the talent here and regionally, I just wanted to help in any way I could. Mat has worked really hard to bring so many people together for a great cause, which is not only a benefit for the Red Cross, but also a benefit to all of us by getting so many musicians from this area at one festival.

It’s hard to articulate an answer to the last one. The benefits of the arts to all communities are just so intangible. It really gives us artsy types a little more room to breathe.

Falter
(https://www.facebook.com/FalterMusic)

Home for Falter is right here in Hopkins County. With the exception of our drummer Bryan Thomas who resides in Hopkinsville, KY, all other members (Kevin Offutt, John Pierce, Brad Wilson, Adam O’Rear) were raised right here in Hopkins County.

We in Falter are big believers in giving back to our community, charities, and to society in general. Each year we set aside time and promotions for events such as the Mad Flavor Fest. We have done quite a few this year. Most recently, we played the Thumbs Up For What’s Wright Benefit in Nashville at the Tin Roof. We have had very much support from our fans, especially the fans right here in Hopkins County, so we were thrilled at the chance of being a part of this event for our hometown community and for the American Red Cross. It’s been some time now since we’ve been able to play a show right here at home due to scheduling issues, so being a part of this event is very exciting because allows a way to raise money for the American Red Cross while also bringing awareness to this community, which is a plentiful melting pot of talent. Whether it be musicianship or the arts, Hopkins County is rich with both.

There are so many points that I could address on the matter of music and art’s importance and role in raising of a cultured and great society. Music was a huge part of my life personally, and at no matter what point of my life, I have always acknowledged there has been an overwhelming yearning and calling in my life for music. I am following the calling now on a larger scale, but even if I wasn’t, music will always be a large part of me. To us, the biggest importance to a community and society is self expression and our rights and freedom. So many times I have heard stories of schools cutting the arts programs, and this saddens me because these programs give kids the avenue to find their true passions as artists.

JT Oglesby
(www.facebook.com/jtoglesby)

I am a gypsy-spirited vagabond that embarked on a spiritual journey exploring the musical and creative aspects of the world during my teens, which continues to this day. My band consists of rounders, misfits, and other miscreants I have encountered over the years that embrace a noncompliant societal and creative view. These roustabouts frequently change, making my band an ever-shifting work-in-progress. Each unique version explores a different path unknown to the incarnations before it.

I wanted to get involved with this festival because I am proud to be a Kentuckian and I am proud to be from this area. My family has lived and died in this area for so long that there is more of my DNA in this soil than dirt. I want to do whatever I can to help promote and preserve our heritage and culture. A lot of people say it, but few truly mean it: LLKM! Long Live Kentucky Music!

Hollywood Gutterats
(www.facebook.com/HollywoodGutterats)

Home is where the rock is! The Hollywood Gutterats are Slush (lead vox and guitar), Yngwie Springsteen (guitar), Micheal Anthony Hall (bass), and Tommy Lee Greenwood (drums).

Why did we get involved? Because Slush and Mat Pentacost both like Taco Bell Chalupas!

Music and art is important because it touches everyone in one way or another. And who doesn’t like to be touched?

Technology Versus Horse
(www.reverbnation.com/technologyvshorse)

Technology Versus Horse as a band is from Bowling Green, KY. We all met while/shortly after attending WKU. We are composed of Mike Farmer (vocals), myself (Rafe Heltsley–guitar), Matt Bitner (bass), David Prater (keys), and Josh Hines (drums).

I grew up in White Plains, KY and went to high school in Madisonville (Hopkins County Central High School). When Mat Pentecost was thinking about throwing the festival, he mentioned it to me. I thought it sounded like a great idea and wanted my band to play to show our support.

Music and art are very important outlets of expression. They also help gather people together, bonding over a shared favorite band or artist or meeting up at local shows.

The Fair-Weather Kings
(www.facebook.com/thefairweatherkings)

The Fair-Weather Kings started in Bowling Green KY and all of us still live here. Our members our Wesley Stone, Zach Barton, Jason Williams, Craig Brown, and Marcus Long

Zach and I (Wesley) grew up in Madisonville. Marcus is also from Hopkins County. So we have "roots" there, so to speak. Zach and Marcus' parents still live in Hopkins County. So, for us, getting involved with the festival was about the opportunity to be involved in an event that not only benefits the American Red Cross, but also brings art, in various forms, to a town that a few of us have called home.

Art and music are important because they are "tools" that have many uses; free to anyone that desires them.

The Artists and Vendors
QUESTIONS:
1.) What's your personal info (name, age, hometown, business name and overview, etc.)?
2.) Why is your art form or craft important to you personally?
3.) Why did you decide to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest? OR Why is the festival important to our community?

MCC Humanities Division
(www.madisonville.kctcs.edu/)

Myself (Brooke Archila) and perhaps a few others will be setting up a booth to represent the Humanities Division at Madisonville Community College. The Humanities Division is an eclectic group of instructors who teach classes in the fields of English, history, communications, foreign languages, music, reading, art, and women's studies. We support and promote anything related to these areas on campus and in the community. The study of humanities in various forms is essential to understanding ourselves and the world around us. Through these areas of study, we express our creativity and share in the creativity of others. In our representation of our department at the festival, we want to share the many cool things we have going on in the fall and encourage involvement and support!

Bad Apple Paintwerks
(www.facebook.com/BadApplePaintwerks)
My name is Patrick Harvey and I'm the owner of Bad Apple Paintwerks. I'm 38 and my hometown is Hopkins County. I create art directed towards the musically inclined.

Why is what I do important to me personally? A favorite quote of mine might sum that up: "Paint chips make me thirsty."

I decided to get involved with this festival because I live here and I want to help promote the arts in our community when I have the chance. 

HoldFast WoodCO.
(www.facebook.com/HoldfastWoodCo)
 
My name is Cody McDowell. I’m 24 years old and live in Madisonville, KY. I’m the owner of HoldFast WoodCO. I create simple custom furniture and home decor.

Woodworking is important to me because it’s becoming a lost art, yet it’s one of the basic trades that defines us as a country and as a civilization in general. I think that using reclaimed materials and old tools to do my work is also an important part of what I do because anyone can go to Lowe’s and buy a new 2x4, but if you go to a barn and pull off a 2x4, it has character, it’s had purpose, and it’s been reliable for years and years. Taking something like that and making it into a coffee table for someone means they have a piece of history that will outlive them; it’s something that they can pass to their kids. The Mad Flavor Fest is important to the Hopkins County region, as well as all the local artists and crafts people, because maybe for that one day that we are set up, someone will buy a CD from a band that actually needs the money, and instead of getting something out of a box at Wal-Mart, they will buy something handmade and invest just a little money back into their local economy.

Elite Tattoo Lounge
(www.facebook.com/EliteTattooLounge)

My name is Aaron “Chappy” Chapman. I’m originally from Denver, CO and I own and operate Elite Tattoo Lounge (530 E. Center St., Madisonville KY 42431). We are a full service tattoo and body mod studio, specializing in all styles of tattooing from black and grey, to new school, to photorealism.

The art of tattooing is important to me for many reasons. First, it’s how I make my living, and I make a very good living doing it. It’s really about doing something that you love, but when you can make a living doing it, it is priceless. This is not my job, it is my career and my work. It is what people will know of me when I die.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest because I believe in Madisonville. For so long there has been a lack of focus in this area toward the arts and culture, and people here have lacked a focal point to channel their artistic talents. This town is so full of talented people it is going to burst. That is what the Mad Flavor Fest is to me: the Madisonville arts community no longer being content to stay at home, no longer being contained!

Travis Shanks
(www.facebook.com/tshanks7720?fref=ts)
 
I’m Travis Shanks, 21, and my hometown is Slaughters, KY

Painting and drawing is important to me because it's a great way to express myself. At one point in my life, it helped me escape some hard times. Art gives a way for us to bring beauty into a world where beauty is rapidly thinning.

I decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so I could share my art with more people. And, hopefully, to become known in some way as a reputable artist in the community. The Mad Flavor Fest is most definitely important to our community and what we, as artists, are trying to achieve. Hopefully, this festival will open the eyes of the community to the true value of art, which is so often forgotten in modern times. Also, it's going to be a great place to meet all the people in the local area that share your passions. I cannot wait!

Poppy & Clover (Gina Boyd & Riley Jo Dever)
(www.facebook.com/poppyandclover?fref=ts)

We are a mother/daughter team that loves to craft. We specialize in antiques, soy candles, soaps, pillows, and many other delightful offerings. We are hoping to actually open a store by summertime so that we may invite you down for a cup of tea and to browse around—or just to stop in and say hello.

We have always enjoyed art and crafting around with each other. We decided a couple of years ago to team up and begin to create things that appeal to us and hopefully to others. I love to decorate and it is fulfilling to adorn my home with things that I have created.

We decided to get involved with the Mad Flavor Fest so that we could offer some of our goods for the public to come by and see. As we work on opening our store, we are selling things out of our home. We have been asked my many people to see our things in-person, so here is an opportunity to do that. We hope many people come out and enjoy a day of music and art that is offered by local community members.

Big Biting Pig Productions
(www.bigbitingpigproductions.com/)

Steve Hudgins: I’m originally from Chicago, IL, but I currently live in Dawson Springs, KY.

Big Biting Pig Productions specializes in feature-length thrillers and horror films. I love telling stories, acting, directing others to get the most out of themselves and watching everything come together, so being a filmmaker is kind of a natural thing for my tastes.

I think it's great to have a festival that focuses on Madisonville and helps those in the community see what is out there that they may not be aware of.

PJ Woodside: I'm PJ Woodside, living in Madisonville, originally from Charleston, SC, married to Jude Roy of Louisiana Cajun heritage. I mostly collaborate with Steve Hudgins of Big Biting Pig Productions on movie projects, such as my latest movie which will be premiering this summer, Lucid. We also make book trailers, commercials, and music videos through PJ's Productions.

I've come to appreciate horror movies much more since we started making them several years ago. They help people release their everyday fears in a nonthreatening way. The one we're showing at the festival, Spirit Stalkers, is a combination of ghost hunter’s show and a classic haunted house movie. It will have you on the edge of your seat and jumping many times, but the characters are also interesting and believable. It's important to me to tell stories that matter to people and have some emotional resonance.

I got involved, well, because you asked me! But also, there are a lot of Madisonville locations and people in our movies, so we like to share them with the local community when possible! It's always good to see what is being made right here, right under our noses!

The Learn’d Housewife
(www.facebook.com/thelearndhousewife)

I’m Cassie Pendergraff from the wonderful metropolis of Madvegas. I’m a 2002 MNHHS graduate and owner of The Learn’d Housewife. I enjoy crafting and trying new things. I’ve always loved fabric; I come from a long generation of quilters, so finding new ways to work with fabric is always an adventure. I decided to start making fabric button earrings. For me, it’s a fun way to keep memories. I can take scraps from pretty much anything—a baby quilt, a dress I’ve worn, my daughter’s coming home outfits—and make a pair of earrings or a necklace.

I decided to get involved with the MadFlavor Fest because I love supporting local artisans. It’s a great opportunity to see what’s out there in the community and get connected with other people who have similar interests. There are so many unique and creative people hiding in our hometown and it is events like the Mad Flavor Fest that gives them a chance to crawl out of the woodwork.

* * * * * * *

For more on the Mad Flavor Fest, including directions to the Ballard Convention Center (605 E. Arch St., Madisonville), ticket sales, admission information, vendor sign-up sheets, a full list of current performers, artists, vendors, filmmakers, and much more, visit the recently launched Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival website at the following address: www.MadFlavorFest.com.

You can also find the Mad Flavor Festival’s official Facebook page by clicking here.

To read another Sugg Street Post article about the Mad Flavor Fest, which was written by Jessica Dockrey, click here. To learn more about the CINEMADIC Film Festival, click here.

All ticket sales and additional proceeds raised via the Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival will go to support the efforts of the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red CrossTo learn more about the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, click here.

The Mad Flavor Arts & Music Festival is sponsored by the Mid-West Kentucky Chapter of the Red Cross, the Sugg Street Post, and Art Interactions

Sugg Street Post
Written by Luke Short
Photos courtesy of Jessi Smith, Jeff Harp, and Respective Mad Flavor Festival Participants

 

Read more...

Madisonville’s Historic District—Pate’s Drug Store

MADISONVILLE, KY (5/20/13)—The historical, research-based article found below was provided to the Sugg Street Post and written by Hopkins County Genealogical Society President, Jane Anne Jackson. Jackson's research was made possible by the Hopkins County Genealogical Society and Historical Society of Hopkins County. The image that accompanies this article was taken by area photographer, Tom Wortham. Additional installments regarding historic buildings in Madisonville's historic downtown district will be released on a weekly to bi-weekly basis via the Sugg Street Post's "Days of Yore" section, so check back often for updates.

In 1807, according to Major Gordon’s History of Hopkins County, Pressley Pritchett, the first settler in Madisonville, opened a tavern in the log cabin he had built on the Northwest corner of Main and Center Streets. Soon thereafter, he sold the tavern to William Noel and he (Pritchett) moved to Henderson, KY.

Mr. Noel, a shoemaker, occasional auctioneer, an intermittent keeper of the pound for stray animals, a jailer, and the person responsible for developing the Noel Addition (north of the downtown area), operated the tavern for a number of years.

Historical writings state that the tavern was considered a civic center and also a gathering place for the citizens on public days. Accommodations were available for man and beast, and alcoholic beverages were available. Breakfast was at daybreak, dinner at noon, and supper at six. There was always a wash stand (with basin), a bucket of spring water, and a homespun flax towel on the back porch awaiting the weary traveler who wanted to freshen up a bit.

It is not known how long Mr. Noel operated the tavern, but after his death, which was around 1844, his son George W. Noel, inherited the property. In September, 1867, George sold it to R.J. Littlepage for $500.00, after which the building on the lot was replaced by the current structure.

The deed from Noel to Littlepage recited that the property being conveyed was part of the “old tavern lot”.

At the April, 1808 meeting of the Hopkins County Court, the tavern rates within the county were fixed as follows:

Wine (per gallon): $4.00
Rum (per gallon): $2.66
Cider (per quart): $0.12
Lodging (per night): $0.12
Dinner: $0.25
Pasturage for 24 hours: $0.25
French Brandy (per gallon): $4.00
Whiskey (per half pint): $0.12
Peach or Apple Brandy (per half pint): $0.12
Breakfast or Supper (with coffee or tea): $0.25
For Horse & Hay: $0.12
Corn or Oats (per gallon): $0.12

In November 1872, Littlepage sold the property to W.C. Mitchell who, in turn, sold the property in December 1873 to William Rash, with the consideration being $1,135.00. William Rash died testate and by the terms of his Last Will & Testament, he devised the property to his widow, Lizzie Rash, and his son, John T. Rash. In 1897, Mrs. L.L. Grubbs (formerly Lizzie Rash) and son, John T. Rash, sold the property to attorney J.B. Earle for $3,500.00. J.B. Earle was the gentleman for whom Earlington, KY was named.

During Earle’s ownership of the building, it housed The Hustler newspaper office and the law office of John G.B. Hall, as well as Mr. Earle’s law office, both of which were on the 2nd floor. Additionally, the IOOF Lodge, as well as the Masonic Lodge, held meetings on the 3rd floor.

In the 1907/1908 Madisonville City Directory, a barbershop, Littlepage & Edwards, occupied the building, and sometime prior to 1927, it housed Pate’s Drug Store, which was owned and operated by Marvin E. Pate (wife, Anna).

In the 1932/1933 Madisonville City Directory, there are two Pate’s Drug Stores, one at this location (Northwest corner of North Main Street & West Center) and the other is listed at 111 West Center owned and operated by the same people.

In the 1940, 1946, and 1947 City Directories, the business was still under the same ownership. As mentioned above, J.B. Griffin became the owner of the property in 1960.

This corner is fondly remembered by many residents simply as “Pate’s Corner”. The drug store, as well as the steps of the adjoining building, was very popular with the teenagers, especially the young men, over the years. No girls were allowed on the steps.

This writer is not aware of the date of the closing of the drugstore; however, J.B. Griffin and wife, Willie Mae, conveyed the property in 1987 to Mike and Maureen Tomblinson and Allen and Pam Rudd.

In 2003, the property was sold to William A. Nisbet, IV. It served as his law office until being sold at the courthouse door in 2011 to Dean Sheets by the Master Commissioner of Hopkins County.

Sugg Street Post
Written by Hopkins County Genealogical Society President, Jane Ann Jackson
Main photo by Tom Wortham
Additional images courtesy of Jane Jackson

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Visit www.betroll.co.uk the best bookies

© 2013 Sugg Street Post LLC:
All Rights Reserved
Based in Madisonville, Ky 42431
info@suggstreetpost.com | 270-871-2147

Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram