Displaying items by tag: lures

West Kentucky Wild: Bass at Night

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (8/15/13)—Problem: summertime doldrums. Extreme heat, lots of sun, water temperatures in the high 80s, and a lack of current caused by an absence of wind or very little water being pulled through the dam. Not to mention the big lakes that can accommodate all the summertime traffic of ski boats, jet skis, pontoons, etc. Throw in an occasional barge along with a slow bite and you’ve got a challenge on your hands. Maybe it’s time to start getting ready for deer season. 

Too hot to fish?
There is no such thing. You just have to adjust to either a few hours at dawn or a few hours at dusk. (I will admit that fishing all day in this summer heat should be one of the official stages of the Iron Man contest, though) Perhaps it’s time to take a serious look at nighttime fishing.  

There is no question that bass, as well as some giants, feed at night, especially during hot weather periods. Summer nighttime fishing for bass works as good on local lakes as it does on bigger waters like Kentucky Lake. It is especially effective on clear water lakes and strip pits.   

Moon vs. dark: Which is the best?
While the experts say couple of days before and couple of days after the full moon is best, experiment and come to your own conclusion. While it’s certainly easier to see and get around, many anglers still swear by the dark. Personally, I prefer nights with very little moon and plenty of stars.  

With the specialty night lights available now—a favorite of mine is the one with lights built into the bill of the cap, which frees up your hands for retying and netting—there is no reason to let the dark hold you back. If you desire more light, there are some really good black lights available too, which will help you see shorelines and obstacles in the water. An added bonus: fluorescent mono line is magnified by black light, so you can see movements and twitches clearly. 

Lures
While nighttime fishing has sold millions of black Jitterbugs (and rightfully so), there are nights where top-water lures are not the best option. Some conditions, such as excessive moss or grass, will limit the selections. Try spinnerbaits in dark colors. Plastic worms and jigs will work, too.  

Final Word
It’s a good idea to get on the water prior to dark. Remember that it’s going to be cooler, lots quieter, and the fish will bite. Be sure and take your life jacket and your mosquito repellent, watch out for the summertime storms, and be sure and take a net. That big bass just might let his guard down. 

Required Listening
Edgar Winter’s third studio album, They Only Come Out at Night, which was released in November, 1972. Listen to the album in its entirety by clicking the YouTube player below this article. 

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A former Kentucky State BASS Federation Champ and longtime outdoorsman, Nick Short has spent over five decades learning the ins and outs of the hunting and fishing world. From coon-hunting as a youth, to hanging with fishing pros as an adult, Nick knows a thing or two about how it’s done outdoors. Want to know his secrets? Check out his latest installment of “West Kentucky Wild.”

To read other “West Kentucky Wild” installments, visit Nick’s Sugg Street Post blog page by clicking the following link: http://www.suggstreetpost.com/index.php/outdoors-west-kentucky-wild 

Sugg Street Post
Written by Nick Short

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West Kentucky Wild: What’s My Line?

HOPKINS COUNTY, KY (2/9/13)—A former Kentucky State BASS Federation Champ and longtime outdoorsman, Nick Short has spent over five decades learning the ins and outs of the hunting and fishing world. From coon-hunting as a youth, to hanging with fishing pros as an adult, Nick knows a thing or two about how it’s done outdoors. Want to know his secrets? Check out his latest installment of “West Kentucky Wild.”

Confused by all the choices? Braid, monofilament, fluorocarbon, low-visibility, high-visibility, tensile strength—and what about pound test?

I just wanted to change the line that’s been on my reel since, well…forever.

Late winter and early spring is a great time to change your line before it lets you down. We could spend days just talking about lines and all the different applications, but this article will deal with the basics to help you figure it all out.

Monofilament

Monofilament is still, by and large, the cheapest and best overall choice for general applications. Always use the lightest pound test you can get away with. For spincasters, as well as spinning reels, use six to eight—and even up to ten—pound test. Any bigger and it begins to get cumbersome. Casting reels will handle larger lines and lures. Depending on snags, rocks, or heavy cover, lines from 12 up to 20lb mono will work very well. However, the stronger or “higher test” line will decrease casting distance and flexibility. Colors to use: clear blue and moss greens. Monofilament lines also have good knot strength and provide some stretch.

Braids

Braids are indestructible, last forever, and have zero stretch. To put this in perspective, 60lb test braided line is about the same diameter as 6lb mono. Braided line is excellent for use in heavy vegetation (lily pads, grass, etc.). It will cut through vegetation easily, whereas mono will hang. Braided line allows for long casting distances and quicker hook sets. The negatives: price, high-visibility, and noise. Also, when pressure is heavily applied to the spool, the line tends to tangle by cutting into itself. Braids can be enhanced by using a leader of monofilament or fluorocarbon. A good choice for a “Carolina rig” is a fluoro leader.

Fluorocarbon

Fluorocarbon is the most expensive line available. As a result, it’s generally only available at high-end tackle dealers, such as Winding Creek Bait & Tackle in Madisonville, or through mail-order outlets. Try the 150 yard spool if you can handle the $20 or so cost. Sunline’s “FC Sniper” or Seaguar are both good choices. Fluoro has very little stretch, is so clear it’s practically invisible, sinks quicker than mono or braid, and provides an excellent feel on jigs, worms, and shaky-head applications. It also works well with crankbaits and suspending jerk baits. Negatives: price (use a backing line so you can use only as much fluoro as you need) and some stiffness. A Palomar knot is the most commonly used, but experimentation may be required. Fluoro leaders work excellent with braided lines. Colors: clear.

FINAL TIP: Fresh line and a good drag will greatly increase the odds of landing that big fish.

Good luck!

Sugg Street Post
Written by Nick Short
Column logo/photo by Jeff Harp

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